No Crashes - What Specs for Computer?

G

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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Now that I've made the move from dial-up to high speed (DSL) I'm ready
to ditch my five year old Compaq very soon.

The main problem I have with this computer is that it has always crashed
a lot and seems to crash more and more.

It's running Windows ME, 850MHz Pentium III, 128MB ram.

Now that I'm on a modern high speed connection I want a computer that I
can keep on for weeks at a time. I want a computer that will not crash when
I'm listening to steaming audio while surfing three or four different web
pages at the same time, while downloading content.

What do I need in a computer to accomplish this? Is the solution to
just move up to Windows XP? How much ram do I need? Is 500MB enough for my
needs or should I move up to 1GB?

I don't play games on my computer (I have an XBox for that) except for
online chess, poker, and backgammon. So, I don't need a maxed out system.

I do play a lot of music on my computer and store a lot of pictures from
my digi-cam.

So, what would the minimum requirements be for a computer?

The most important thing I want is a stable system.

Thanks
 
G

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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

My needs sound much like yours. I don't do gaming, digital
photography/digital darkroom is my main hobby on the computer. Don't listen
a whole to music but when I do I want it to sound GREAT. I'm still on
dialup. Should be getting wireless in my area in the next month or two :)
Multitasking: Listening to live talk radio via the computer, surfing and
doing digital darkroom work. Even with my 44kbps connection, I can do this.
Yes the streaming audio cuts out some while download other pages so I try
not to do that much.
After consulting this newsgroup, I chose the following: 8400 3.2Ghz with
4xx(?) mhz, 2MB L2 cache, 1GB RAM, 160GB hard drive (have an additional 40GB
drive), 16x DVD dual layer burner, Soundblaster Audigy sound card with Dolby
and the 5.1 surround sound speakers w/subwoofer. The monitor I chose was
the Dell UltraSharp 20" Flat Panel Widescreen...movies on this baby are
awesome :) I've held out for soooo long switching from a CRT to LCD monitor
because LCD just wasn't there yet with photography. Well maybe it WASN'T
but it is now with this monitor! OMGoodness! Awesome color, clarity and
sharpness. Crisp, clear text.
Monica
"Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:XiKje.658$oT1.591@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>
> Now that I've made the move from dial-up to high speed (DSL) I'm ready
> to ditch my five year old Compaq very soon.

>
>
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

No Crashes is like a perfect world. Never gonna happen, Macs and :Linux do
crash too

XP would cause problems with 128MB.

any computer with at least 512MB Ram as 512 is the recommend for XP. Go for
a gig if you can afford it and a big hard drive would be fine.


"Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:XiKje.658$oT1.591@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>
> Now that I've made the move from dial-up to high speed (DSL) I'm ready
> to ditch my five year old Compaq very soon.
>
> The main problem I have with this computer is that it has always
> crashed
> a lot and seems to crash more and more.
>
> It's running Windows ME, 850MHz Pentium III, 128MB ram.
>
> Now that I'm on a modern high speed connection I want a computer that I
> can keep on for weeks at a time. I want a computer that will not crash
> when
> I'm listening to steaming audio while surfing three or four different web
> pages at the same time, while downloading content.
>
> What do I need in a computer to accomplish this? Is the solution to
> just move up to Windows XP? How much ram do I need? Is 500MB enough for
> my
> needs or should I move up to 1GB?
>
> I don't play games on my computer (I have an XBox for that) except for
> online chess, poker, and backgammon. So, I don't need a maxed out system.
>
> I do play a lot of music on my computer and store a lot of pictures
> from
> my digi-cam.
>
> So, what would the minimum requirements be for a computer?
>
> The most important thing I want is a stable system.
>
> Thanks
>
>
>
>
>
>
 

GTS

Distinguished
Aug 24, 2003
520
0
18,980
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

XP is substantially more stable. It does not have the resource limitation
problem of 9X which is likely the cause of many of your crashes (since you
mention significant multitasking). Your computer could run XP, though it
sounds like you're about due for a new one. Should you choose to upgrade
you it would be highly advisable to at least double the RAM and check first
re. availability of XP drivers for all your hardware. Given the cost of the
RAM and XP itself, replacing it makes more sense unless you're on tight
budget..
--

"Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:XiKje.658$oT1.591@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>
> Now that I've made the move from dial-up to high speed (DSL) I'm ready
> to ditch my five year old Compaq very soon.
>
> The main problem I have with this computer is that it has always
> crashed
> a lot and seems to crash more and more.
>
> It's running Windows ME, 850MHz Pentium III, 128MB ram.
>
> Now that I'm on a modern high speed connection I want a computer that I
> can keep on for weeks at a time. I want a computer that will not crash
> when
> I'm listening to steaming audio while surfing three or four different web
> pages at the same time, while downloading content.
>
> What do I need in a computer to accomplish this? Is the solution to
> just move up to Windows XP? How much ram do I need? Is 500MB enough for
> my
> needs or should I move up to 1GB?
>
> I don't play games on my computer (I have an XBox for that) except for
> online chess, poker, and backgammon. So, I don't need a maxed out system.
>
> I do play a lot of music on my computer and store a lot of pictures
> from
> my digi-cam.
>
> So, what would the minimum requirements be for a computer?
>
> The most important thing I want is a stable system.
>
> Thanks
>
>
>
>
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"GTS" <x@y.com> wrote in message news:drLje.5$nb.1@trndny03...
> XP is substantially more stable. It does not have the resource limitation
> problem of 9X which is likely the cause of many of your crashes (since you
> mention significant multitasking). Your computer could run XP, though it
> sounds like you're about due for a new one. Should you choose to upgrade
> you it would be highly advisable to at least double the RAM and check
first
> re. availability of XP drivers for all your hardware. Given the cost of
the
> RAM and XP itself, replacing it makes more sense unless you're on tight
> budget..



I've noticed one place where I could save a little money is on extended
warranties. When I bought my first computer (the one I'm using now -
Compaq) at Circuit City I bought a three year extended warranty that added
(if I remember correctly) around $150.00 I've never had a major problem
tho so I really did not get use out of the extended warranty.

So, what's the word on warranties and computers? Is it worth buying
extended warranties? Do I need at least a one year warranty? What about
two years?
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

I don't trust anything anymore :( I bought the 3 year extended warranty and
at the time was upgraded to 4 years for free.
"Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:NMLje.4099$X92.1596@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...

> I've noticed one place where I could save a little money is on extended
> warranties. When I bought my first computer (the one I'm using now -
> Compaq) at Circuit City I bought a three year extended warranty that added
> (if I remember correctly) around $150.00 I've never had a major problem
> tho so I really did not get use out of the extended warranty.
 
G

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Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Von Fourche wrote:

> "GTS" <x@y.com> wrote in message news:drLje.5$nb.1@trndny03...
>
>>XP is substantially more stable. It does not have the resource limitation
>>problem of 9X which is likely the cause of many of your crashes (since you
>>mention significant multitasking). Your computer could run XP, though it
>>sounds like you're about due for a new one. Should you choose to upgrade
>>you it would be highly advisable to at least double the RAM and check
>
> first
>
>>re. availability of XP drivers for all your hardware. Given the cost of
>
> the
>
>>RAM and XP itself, replacing it makes more sense unless you're on tight
>>budget..
>
> I've noticed one place where I could save a little money is on extended
> warranties. When I bought my first computer (the one I'm using now -
> Compaq) at Circuit City I bought a three year extended warranty that added
> (if I remember correctly) around $150.00 I've never had a major problem
> tho so I really did not get use out of the extended warranty.
>
> So, what's the word on warranties and computers? Is it worth buying
> extended warranties?

Opinions vary, I have never bought one for any computer (inc. laptops)
and have never regretted it. As always, YMMV.

> Do I need at least a one year warranty?

Yes, Dells come with a one year warranty at no additional charge.

> What about two years?

As above, I wouldn't, but YMMV

The only thing for which I have ever purchased an extended warranty is
for the Sony 32" LCD TV I bought in 02/2005. If something conks out on
that after 2 1/2 years (the way it did on my previous TV), I do not want
to be looking at another $3,000 out of pocket or a big repair bill.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Von Fourche wrote:

> I've noticed one place where I could save a little money is on extended
> warranties. When I bought my first computer (the one I'm using now -
> Compaq) at Circuit City I bought a three year extended warranty that added
> (if I remember correctly) around $150.00 I've never had a major problem
> tho so I really did not get use out of the extended warranty.
>
> So, what's the word on warranties and computers? Is it worth buying
> extended warranties? Do I need at least a one year warranty? What about
> two years?
>
>
A good rule of thumb is to only buy a warranty when it's cost is less
than the cost of the parts it covers times the probability of the parts
failing: warranty < Cost(parts)*Prob(failure).

Personally I only buy extended warranties for high end laptops (only the
mail-in on failure kind, not accident insurrance ones). In the case of
a laptop, there are parts that can fail which cost nearly the price of
the laptop (namely the LCD, although the mobo failing would be expensive
too). Personally, I always build my own desktops, so warranties aren't
a consideration. As to warranty duration, on a $2000 laptop I'd go at
least 3 years. Also I only buy warranties from the OEM -- never from
third parties like Circuit City, Best Buy, Fry's, etc. There are too
many horror stories about 3rd party warranties (check out bestbuysux.org
for examples), and no one knows the computer better than the people who
acutally designed it.

Even if I were to buy a desktop, I doubt I'd consider a warranty. The
only part that could fail which would be tough to replace is the
motherboard (and this is only because third party mobo's don't fit in
Dell cases). Even if my mobo failed, I'd probably just buy a new mobo &
case, strip the working parts from my Dell, and put them on the new
machine. The cost of a new motherboard and a good case is less than the
cost of a Dell Warranty and it's arguably the most expensive part that
has a relatively high likelihood of failure (assuming normal use, not
overclocking).

Now if I didn't know how to build a computer, where to get parts for
cheap, etc. I'd consider a warranty. Also if I needed an extremely high
uptime, eg. if this was a business machine, I'd consider an on-site
warranty.
 
G

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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Von Fourche wrote:

> Now that I've made the move from dial-up to high speed (DSL) I'm
> ready to ditch my five year old Compaq very soon.

> The main problem I have with this computer is that it has always
> crashed a lot and seems to crash more and more.

> It's running Windows ME, 850MHz Pentium III, 128MB ram.

The Pentium III is capable of doing all that you describe below. But you're
short on RAM, HD space and Windows ME has probably been the #1 factor in
your problems. Before upgrading, look at new, and see if that works for you.

> Now that I'm on a modern high speed connection I want a computer
> that I can keep on for weeks at a time. I want a computer that will
> not crash when I'm listening to steaming audio while surfing three or
> four different web pages at the same time, while downloading content.

Set a budget, and compare a few manufacturers.

> What do I need in a computer to accomplish this? Is the solution
> to just move up to Windows XP? How much ram do I need? Is 500MB
> enough for my needs or should I move up to 1GB?

> I don't play games on my computer (I have an XBox for that)
> except for online chess, poker, and backgammon. So, I don't need a
> maxed out system.

> I do play a lot of music on my computer and store a lot of
> pictures from my digi-cam.

> So, what would the minimum requirements be for a computer?

Look at a Dimension 4700. Just noticed an offer with 19" LCD. You would have
to add more memory for 512MB. Get a 160GB drive, for the music and digital
pictures you are storing.

See if this goes beyond your budget.

Ed
 
G

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Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

"Ed Wurster" <glass_net@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:AaKdnbw5IfH7OA3fRVn-gQ@comcast.com...
> Von Fourche wrote:
>
> > Now that I've made the move from dial-up to high speed (DSL) I'm
> > ready to ditch my five year old Compaq very soon.
>
> > The main problem I have with this computer is that it has always
> > crashed a lot and seems to crash more and more.
>
> > It's running Windows ME, 850MHz Pentium III, 128MB ram.
>
> The Pentium III is capable of doing all that you describe below. But
you're
> short on RAM, HD space and Windows ME has probably been the #1 factor in
> your problems. Before upgrading, look at new, and see if that works for
you.
>
> > Now that I'm on a modern high speed connection I want a computer
> > that I can keep on for weeks at a time. I want a computer that will
> > not crash when I'm listening to steaming audio while surfing three or
> > four different web pages at the same time, while downloading content.
>
> Set a budget, and compare a few manufacturers.
>
> > What do I need in a computer to accomplish this? Is the solution
> > to just move up to Windows XP? How much ram do I need? Is 500MB
> > enough for my needs or should I move up to 1GB?
>
> > I don't play games on my computer (I have an XBox for that)
> > except for online chess, poker, and backgammon. So, I don't need a
> > maxed out system.
>
> > I do play a lot of music on my computer and store a lot of
> > pictures from my digi-cam.
>
> > So, what would the minimum requirements be for a computer?
>
> Look at a Dimension 4700. Just noticed an offer with 19" LCD. You would
have
> to add more memory for 512MB. Get a 160GB drive, for the music and digital
> pictures you are storing.



Whenever I got thru web sites I always add 1GB ram. Is 1GB overkill for
basic home computer use? I don't edit home videos or anything like that.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Von Fourche wrote:

> Whenever I got thru web sites I always add 1GB ram. Is 1GB
> overkill for basic home computer use? I don't edit home videos or
> anything like that.

I went to 512MB because you have to do that with XP.

I looked at 1GB, but decided to save some money (about $100) and put some of
that savings into a 160GB drive.

In the future you will want it. If you can get it now, then spend the money.

Ed
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.dell (More info?)

Von Fourche wrote:

> "Ed Wurster" <glass_net@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:AaKdnbw5IfH7OA3fRVn-gQ@comcast.com...
>
>>Von Fourche wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Now that I've made the move from dial-up to high speed (DSL) I'm
>>>ready to ditch my five year old Compaq very soon.
>>
>>> The main problem I have with this computer is that it has always
>>>crashed a lot and seems to crash more and more.
>>
>>> It's running Windows ME, 850MHz Pentium III, 128MB ram.
>>
>>The Pentium III is capable of doing all that you describe below. But
>
> you're
>
>>short on RAM, HD space and Windows ME has probably been the #1 factor in
>>your problems. Before upgrading, look at new, and see if that works for
>
> you.
>
>>> Now that I'm on a modern high speed connection I want a computer
>>>that I can keep on for weeks at a time. I want a computer that will
>>>not crash when I'm listening to steaming audio while surfing three or
>>>four different web pages at the same time, while downloading content.
>>
>>Set a budget, and compare a few manufacturers.
>>
>>
>>> What do I need in a computer to accomplish this? Is the solution
>>>to just move up to Windows XP? How much ram do I need? Is 500MB
>>>enough for my needs or should I move up to 1GB?
>>
>>> I don't play games on my computer (I have an XBox for that)
>>>except for online chess, poker, and backgammon. So, I don't need a
>>>maxed out system.
>>
>>> I do play a lot of music on my computer and store a lot of
>>>pictures from my digi-cam.
>>
>>> So, what would the minimum requirements be for a computer?
>>
>>Look at a Dimension 4700. Just noticed an offer with 19" LCD. You would
>
> have
>
>>to add more memory for 512MB. Get a 160GB drive, for the music and digital
>>pictures you are storing.
>
>
>
>
> Whenever I got thru web sites I always add 1GB ram. Is 1GB overkill for
> basic home computer use? I don't edit home videos or anything like that.
>
>
512MB ought to be enough for 95% of your uses (and chances are you'll be
fine that remaining 5%). If it's a laptop, I recommend going only 1
DIMM so that you'll have the option to expand to a gig in the future
(for a desktop with 4 slots, it's less of an issue).
 

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