[SOLVED] No display after BIOS change

greensean123

Reputable
Aug 27, 2018
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I was changing a setting in my BIOS, restarted my computer, and now I have no display. I unplugged the computer, took out the CMOS battery, jumped my clear cmos pins, pressed the power button for a while, plugged it back in and it turned on, turned itself off, then turned on again and no display. Everything gets power, including my monitor cable, but just no display. Should I just leave the CMOS battery out overnight?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What are your full hardware specifications?


Try disconnecting the power cable from the back of the PSU (Or flipping the switch to the "0" position on the back of the PSU) then removing the graphics card completely (Or installing a different graphics card entirely), THEN removing the CMOS battery for five minutes. During that five minutes press the power button on the case continuously for 30 seconds to deplete any residual charge that might remain. After 30 seconds you can stop pressing the power button and wait for the remainder of the five minutes then reinstall the CMOS battery being sure to put it back in with the correct side facing up. Reconnect the power cable to the PSU or flip the switch back to the "I" position. Then power on the system and let it do whatever it wants to do for a minute or two. If it cycles, so be it. If it powers on and shuts down immediately, so be it. After a couple of minutes, power it off, flip the PSU switch off again or disconnect the cable and reinstall your graphics card.

Once the card is reinstalled, plug the cable back on and see if the system will power up and has a display signal.

If you have another graphics card you can probably avoid all that by simply powering off, unplugging the PSU from the wall, installing the different graphics card, plug back in and power on. Often the change in card will trigger the display to begin working again and then you can just reverse the procedure to go back to your original card. No idea why this happens on some systems, but it does. Can also try just using a different TYPE of display output, as in, switch to HDMI from DP or whatever.

Out of curiosity and because it might matter, WHAT setting in the BIOS did you change?
 

greensean123

Reputable
Aug 27, 2018
17
0
4,520
0
What are your full hardware specifications?


Try disconnecting the power cable from the back of the PSU (Or flipping the switch to the "0" position on the back of the PSU) then removing the graphics card completely (Or installing a different graphics card entirely), THEN removing the CMOS battery for five minutes. During that five minutes press the power button on the case continuously for 30 seconds to deplete any residual charge that might remain. After 30 seconds you can stop pressing the power button and wait for the remainder of the five minutes then reinstall the CMOS battery being sure to put it back in with the correct side facing up. Reconnect the power cable to the PSU or flip the switch back to the "I" position. Then power on the system and let it do whatever it wants to do for a minute or two. If it cycles, so be it. If it powers on and shuts down immediately, so be it. After a couple of minutes, power it off, flip the PSU switch off again or disconnect the cable and reinstall your graphics card.

Once the card is reinstalled, plug the cable back on and see if the system will power up and has a display signal.

If you have another graphics card you can probably avoid all that by simply powering off, unplugging the PSU from the wall, installing the different graphics card, plug back in and power on. Often the change in card will trigger the display to begin working again and then you can just reverse the procedure to go back to your original card. No idea why this happens on some systems, but it does. Can also try just using a different TYPE of display output, as in, switch to HDMI from DP or whatever.

Out of curiosity and because it might matter, WHAT setting in the BIOS did you change?
I don’t remember exactly what setting it was. I think I accidentally changed something related to “license” and from windows 10 mode to something like “windows 10 DHQL” or something. The motherboard is a B560 DS3H-AC. RTX 3060, i5-11400F, 16GB RAM. Im going to try what you said to do now.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I think you are talking about the OS version settings for fast boot/UEFI configurations. That shouldn't have caused the problem you are currently having. What is your exact power supply model and how old is it?
 

greensean123

Reputable
Aug 27, 2018
17
0
4,520
0
I think you are talking about the OS version settings for fast boot/UEFI configurations. That shouldn't have caused the problem you are currently having. What is your exact power supply model and how old is it?
The computer is a prebuilt and I just got it. I’m not sure of the exact power supply but it’s an EVGA 600w GD (80+ Gold) (Non-Modular) from what I’ve read online. Everything gets power, including the GPU and my monitor recognizes that it’s getting power when I plug it into the GPU and/or motherboard.
 

greensean123

Reputable
Aug 27, 2018
17
0
4,520
0
What are your full hardware specifications?


Try disconnecting the power cable from the back of the PSU (Or flipping the switch to the "0" position on the back of the PSU) then removing the graphics card completely (Or installing a different graphics card entirely), THEN removing the CMOS battery for five minutes. During that five minutes press the power button on the case continuously for 30 seconds to deplete any residual charge that might remain. After 30 seconds you can stop pressing the power button and wait for the remainder of the five minutes then reinstall the CMOS battery being sure to put it back in with the correct side facing up. Reconnect the power cable to the PSU or flip the switch back to the "I" position. Then power on the system and let it do whatever it wants to do for a minute or two. If it cycles, so be it. If it powers on and shuts down immediately, so be it. After a couple of minutes, power it off, flip the PSU switch off again or disconnect the cable and reinstall your graphics card.

Once the card is reinstalled, plug the cable back on and see if the system will power up and has a display signal.

If you have another graphics card you can probably avoid all that by simply powering off, unplugging the PSU from the wall, installing the different graphics card, plug back in and power on. Often the change in card will trigger the display to begin working again and then you can just reverse the procedure to go back to your original card. No idea why this happens on some systems, but it does. Can also try just using a different TYPE of display output, as in, switch to HDMI from DP or whatever.

Out of curiosity and because it might matter, WHAT setting in the BIOS did you change?
I tried doing the GPU thing and still nothing.
 

greensean123

Reputable
Aug 27, 2018
17
0
4,520
0
I figured out what the issue was. I had to end up clicking the reset button my case all the way down and it reset the motherboard and let me boot into the BIOS. It's always something simple!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So the reset button was stuck between it's positions. Well, glad it was relatively easy anyhow. I generally recommend NOT using the reset button on systems. If you need to restart, CHOOSE to do so using the menu options in Windows or the BIOS. If you need to shut down I recommend doing the same if in Windows. If in BIOS and you need to shut down, then exit via the menu on the exit tab and once it begins to restart THEN press the power button continuously until the system powers off.

These reset buttons are known for getting stuck since they are usually pretty cheap switches, although I haven't seen one do this for a while. Probably because a lot of cases simply do not have reset buttons on them anymore, and now you know why.
 

greensean123

Reputable
Aug 27, 2018
17
0
4,520
0
So the reset button was stuck between it's positions. Well, glad it was relatively easy anyhow. I generally recommend NOT using the reset button on systems. If you need to restart, CHOOSE to do so using the menu options in Windows or the BIOS. If you need to shut down I recommend doing the same if in Windows. If in BIOS and you need to shut down, then exit via the menu on the exit tab and once it begins to restart THEN press the power button continuously until the system powers off.

These reset buttons are known for getting stuck since they are usually pretty cheap switches, although I haven't seen one do this for a while. Probably because a lot of cases simply do not have reset buttons on them anymore, and now you know why.
I don’t think I pressed the reset button that caused it. Maybe it did. I just pressed it with a screwdriver since it’s a small hole. When the BIOS came up, it said “Secure Boot violation. Invalid signature detection. Check secure boot policy in setup.” But I was able to get into the bios and start it up.
 

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