Question No Fan Spin / No POST

garak0410

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Dec 20, 2013
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I searched previous articles on here about NO POST for new Motherboards but I cannot seem to find the problem.

I am building a system for my daughter...first time in over 10 years that I built one because I just got burned out of it and now I see why.

I have a ASUS TUF GAMING Z590-PLUS LGA 1200 Intel Z590 SATA 6Gb/s ATX Intel Motherboard and as far as I can see, all connectors and power is connected. When I plug it in, I don't get the initial fan spin on the CPU fan or system fans...just lights on motherboard...power button doesn't work. I've followed the directions for the motherboard and everything seems right.

Is there an updated NO POST article (not that a lot has changed since 2009) or any other suggestions?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
FULL hardware specifications please, including CPU model, the exact model of your memory kit, the EXACT model of your power supply, graphics card model, drive model(s), etc.?

This is the only relevant no-POST thread that matters here as it covers all of the most common no POST problems.

 

garak0410

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Dec 20, 2013
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FULL hardware specifications please, including CPU model, the exact model of your memory kit, the EXACT model of your power supply, graphics card model, drive model(s), etc.?

This is the only relevant no-POST thread that matters here as it covers all of the most common no POST problems.

Memory: G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 288-Pin PC RAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory Model F4-3200C16D-16GVKB

CPU: G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 288-Pin PC RAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory Model F4-3200C16D-16GVKB

GPU: G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 288-Pin PC RAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory Model F4-3200C16D-16GVKB

PSU: PS 12V 80 Plus Power Supply - Black 600w

SSD: Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB 2.5 Inch SATA III Internal SSD
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, you put your memory model for memory, CPU and graphics card. And didn't list anything specific for your power supply other than it's 600w, the rest, tells us nothing. You're not going to get much (if any) help if you can't follow through on providing this very simple information.

The CPU model matters. The GPU model, matters. The power supply model, matters, and is listed on the label ON the power supply. Without these things, nobody is going to bother trying to help you.
 

garak0410

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Dec 20, 2013
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I bad a bad copy/paste moment...

Memory: G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 288-Pin PC RAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory Model F4-3200C16D-16GVKB

CPU: Intel Core i5-11400F - Core i5 11th Gen Rocket Lake 6-Core 2.6 GHz LGA 1200 65W Desktop Processor

GPU: MSI - GeForce GTX 1650 Gaming X 4GB GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 Graphics Card

PSU: EVGA - W1 Series 600W ATX 12V/EPS 12V 80 Plus Power Supply

SSD: Samsung SSD 860 EVO 1TB 2.5 Inch SATA III Internal SSD
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yep, that's a lot better. Thanks.

So, to start with, if you can, return that PSU. It's 100% complete garbage. Not kidding, completely serious. Not even a question. The N1 and W1 series power supplies are some of the worst ones ever sold by any otherwise well known and respected PSU brand name company. Probably worse even or at least as bad as the old Corsair CX series, especially the CX600 units. Sure, they are probably "ok" for a business machine or mom and pop internet browsing machine, but they are not ok for systems that utilize a discreet graphics card meant for gaming.

For recommendations on what you SHOULD be targeting, you want something GOOD in the 450-550w range for that build. If you plan to upgrade the graphics card in the next few years, might be better to target a GOOD model in the 550-650w range, but for what you have 450-550w is plenty for your current hardware IF the unit is halfway decent. What you have, is not. I'm not saying that your PSU "IS" your problem entirely, but it might be, and no matter what it isn't helping things and assuredly WILL cause you problems sooner rather than later. These are the kind of units also known to occasionally take other hardware out with them when their protections fail too.

Look to these links for recommendations on good PSU models. Don't skimp. The PSU is more important than ANY other component in the system, because NONE of the other hardware works properly if the PSU doesn't work properly and there are a lot more considerations to "works properly" than just "has power". Power good signal, inrush current, capacitor selection, ripple and noise levels, voltage regulation, how the protections are implemented and a variety of other considerations are all at play here and ARE important. Unlike many people wrongly believe, it's NOT simply a matter of "well, it has power so it must be ok". Doesn't work that way.

First thing I'd recommend you do is make sure you are connecting your monitor to the outputs on the graphics card, not on the motherboard. As well, make sure that if your graphics card requires supplemental auxiliary power to be plugged into the card itself, that it is and that the card is fully seated so that the lock is engaged in the end of the PCIe slot to the cutout on the bottom of the graphics card.


Then, I'd unplug ALL of the connections coming from the power switch and front panel, and try jumping the pwr pins on the motherboard using a small flat screwdriver because it's possible they are not plugged in correctly.

In fact, it's probably a really good idea to take the WHOLE THING back out of the case and build it on top of the motherboard box in order to bench test it as I have outlined at the following link.

 

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