[SOLVED] No picture after trying to tweak RAM, fried motherboard?

Aug 31, 2019
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Hi, I am new to the forums and new to PC gaming, sorry if I am posting on the wrong section. Today I tried to tweak my RAM using a safe configuration from the RYZEN DRAM Calculator. After changing the settings in BIOS, my PC would not show any picture o power my keyboard and mouse after rebooting but all components and fans fired up. I tried clearing the CMOS by removing the battery, swapping the RAM to different slots and booting with only one RAM stick. I was able to successfully boot the PC to windows after swapping the CPU to a Ryzen 2200 and one memory stick. After ensuring all BIOS settings were back to default I swapped the CPU back to a Ryzen 3600, booted with the one stick that worked and I was back to square one, no signal and no power to my USB peripherals but all components run, and all lights and fans turn on. Is it possible that I damaged my mobo or my Ryzen 5 3600 CPU? Any help would be appreciated as I am stuck and in panic mode. These are my relevant specs:

CPU: Ryzen 5 3600
GPU: RTX 2070 Super ROG Strix
MOBO: Asus B450 Prime
RAM: 2x 8GB T-Force DDR4 Night Hawk 3000MHz
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Were these sticks part of the same kit, or were they purchased separately?

Have you updated your BIOS to the VERY latest release version?

Have you tried swapping the sticks into the opposite slot, in other words, the stick from A2 (Second slot over from CPU) into the B2 slot and B2 stick into the A2 slot?

You may be right about the other stick, if the system refuses to work with that stick installed. It might however be worth checking to see if that stick works by itself in ANY of the four slots. Also, check the "teeth" on the memory module to see if there is any signs of corrosion or debris on them. If there is, try cleaning them with isopropyl alcohol or rubbing them clean with a clean dry pencil eraser.

Most memory has a lifetime warranty, so as long as you have some form of proof of purchase you should be able to RMA that kit back to the manufacturer but be warned, do NOT allow them to try and replace ONLY one stick. Memory is purchased in matched sets for a reason. Make them replace it as a complete kit, with both sticks new, if they try to do otherwise. An unmatched replacement may not work any better with an existing stick than a completely different memory module would. It can, but it just as easily might not as well. For example:

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/g-skill-trident-z-f4-4133-19-cas-2x8gb-xmp-profile-problems.3462507/post-20934173
 
Reactions: ShinkeiDEI

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Unlikely. Put the Zen2 CPU back in. Make sure your memory modules are installed in the A2 and B2 slots, ONLY, which are the second and fourth slots to the right of the CPU socket.

Next, do a HARD reset as follows.

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.
 
Reactions: ShinkeiDEI
Aug 31, 2019
3
0
10
0
Unlikely. Put the Zen2 CPU back in. Make sure your memory modules are installed in the A2 and B2 slots, ONLY, which are the second and fourth slots to the right of the CPU socket.

Next, do a HARD reset as follows.

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.
Thanks a lot, I have made progess, I am able to boot to windows with one stick of memory and the Zen 2 CPU, I feel the other stick is dead as I cannot get to windows or bios when I put it
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Were these sticks part of the same kit, or were they purchased separately?

Have you updated your BIOS to the VERY latest release version?

Have you tried swapping the sticks into the opposite slot, in other words, the stick from A2 (Second slot over from CPU) into the B2 slot and B2 stick into the A2 slot?

You may be right about the other stick, if the system refuses to work with that stick installed. It might however be worth checking to see if that stick works by itself in ANY of the four slots. Also, check the "teeth" on the memory module to see if there is any signs of corrosion or debris on them. If there is, try cleaning them with isopropyl alcohol or rubbing them clean with a clean dry pencil eraser.

Most memory has a lifetime warranty, so as long as you have some form of proof of purchase you should be able to RMA that kit back to the manufacturer but be warned, do NOT allow them to try and replace ONLY one stick. Memory is purchased in matched sets for a reason. Make them replace it as a complete kit, with both sticks new, if they try to do otherwise. An unmatched replacement may not work any better with an existing stick than a completely different memory module would. It can, but it just as easily might not as well. For example:

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/g-skill-trident-z-f4-4133-19-cas-2x8gb-xmp-profile-problems.3462507/post-20934173
 
Reactions: ShinkeiDEI
Aug 31, 2019
3
0
10
0
Were these sticks part of the same kit, or were they purchased separately?

Have you updated your BIOS to the VERY latest release version?

Have you tried swapping the sticks into the opposite slot, in other words, the stick from A2 (Second slot over from CPU) into the B2 slot and B2 stick into the A2 slot?

You may be right about the other stick, if the system refuses to work with that stick installed. It might however be worth checking to see if that stick works by itself in ANY of the four slots. Also, check the "teeth" on the memory module to see if there is any signs of corrosion or debris on them. If there is, try cleaning them with isopropyl alcohol or rubbing them clean with a clean dry pencil eraser.

Most memory has a lifetime warranty, so as long as you have some form of proof of purchase you should be able to RMA that kit back to the manufacturer but be warned, do NOT allow them to try and replace ONLY one stick. Memory is purchased in matched sets for a reason. Make them replace it as a complete kit, with both sticks new, if they try to do otherwise. An unmatched replacement may not work any better with an existing stick than a completely different memory module would. It can, but it just as easily might not as well. For example:

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/g-skill-trident-z-f4-4133-19-cas-2x8gb-xmp-profile-problems.3462507/post-20934173
Thanks for the attention man, I did try the other stick in different slots to no avail.
Were these sticks part of the same kit, or were they purchased separately?

Have you updated your BIOS to the VERY latest release version?

Have you tried swapping the sticks into the opposite slot, in other words, the stick from A2 (Second slot over from CPU) into the B2 slot and B2 stick into the A2 slot?

You may be right about the other stick, if the system refuses to work with that stick installed. It might however be worth checking to see if that stick works by itself in ANY of the four slots. Also, check the "teeth" on the memory module to see if there is any signs of corrosion or debris on them. If there is, try cleaning them with isopropyl alcohol or rubbing them clean with a clean dry pencil eraser.

Most memory has a lifetime warranty, so as long as you have some form of proof of purchase you should be able to RMA that kit back to the manufacturer but be warned, do NOT allow them to try and replace ONLY one stick. Memory is purchased in matched sets for a reason. Make them replace it as a complete kit, with both sticks new, if they try to do otherwise. An unmatched replacement may not work any better with an existing stick than a completely different memory module would. It can, but it just as easily might not as well. For example:

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/g-skill-trident-z-f4-4133-19-cas-2x8gb-xmp-profile-problems.3462507/post-20934173
Yeah, sadly the other stick is a no go, the PC won't work with it. Thankfully I built this PC a month ago so getting a warranty replacement shouldn't be an issue. Weirdly enough, I am getting 20FPS more playing Control for some reason xD.

Thanks a lot boss for the patience and for helping this humble noob.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
It's no problem. That's what we do here, is try to get people the help they need when we can.

I already said it, but I'll emphasize the importance of making them replace it as a set, not just the one bad stick. I've seen no less than three instances this year, just here on Tom's, myself, where users found one stick was dead and got it replaced only to find it would not play nice with the other stick that was from the original kit. I'll show you why.

From production run to production run, there can be MAJOR differences in exactly how a specific model number is assembled, configured and what parts are USED to built the module. For example, three sticks, all with the same part number and all with completely different configurations. None of them would work with the others.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/amd-ram-compatibility.3210050/#post-19785792
 
Reactions: ShinkeiDEI

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