[SOLVED] No questions

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Appears to be a homework question and per Forum rules we do not answer such questions.

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Present your work and answers to the questions you are asking.

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Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Appears to be a homework question and per Forum rules we do not answer such questions.

May or may not be the case but we have no way to really know.

Present your work and answers to the questions you are asking.

Explain as necessary.
 
Aug 1, 2020
23
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Appears to be a homework question and per Forum rules we do not answer such questions.

May or may not be the case but we have no way to really know.

Present your work and answers to the questions you are asking.

Explain as necessary.
I am not even in school Lol. i am in college now
 
First of all, let me explain some terms.
"Base clock" is a clock provide by pch to keep everything synchronise.
"Cpu frequency" denotes how many clock cycles a cpu can complete in one second.
Base clock * multiplier = cpu frequency
Lets keep the mutiplier 1,
100mhz* 1= Cpu frequency
Soo, cpu will complete 100 million clock cycles in one second.
My question is how base clock and clock multiplier affect the cpu frequency, as i have said that cpu frequency denotes how much clock cycle it can complete in one second, and clock cycles are generated in cpu by transistor, so what's the role of base clock in this case because base clock only works as a timing, it tells computer parts when to become active. Soooo is there some sort of thing like "transistor in cpu becomes active on rising and falling edge"? and i also have a question, does the cpu frequency tells how much clock cycles a single transistor can complete or something else? Pls answer my questions.
Base clock FSB/BCLK is external link to CPU commanding IMC, PCI/PCIe, memory and other clocks. Each one can have own divider from internal core clock so they stay in sync. Ideally it would be 1:1:1 or if not divisible by even number.
Internal also depends on number of cores/threads of course and is counted between cores/threads and Cache.
 
PII as in ... Pentium II/III, ...from 1997-1998 or so? :)

Those were the good ole days, when one could simply up the base clock in mainboards from 100 to 133 MHz (or even 150 MHz in some 440BX boards!), resulting in a 33-50% OC...! (Most of those stellar OC's came with the PIII-600A (Coppermine core), which many folks ran effectively as a PIII/800EB with a few keystrokes in the BIOS, (If I recall, my temps on a P3-600A went from 72F to 83F at idle with those changes)
 
Aug 1, 2020
23
0
10
0
PII as in ... Pentium II/III, ...from 1997-1998 or so? :)

Those were the good ole days, when one could simply up the base clock in mainboards from 100 to 133 MHz (or even 150 MHz in some 440BX boards!), resulting in a 33-50% OC...! (Most of those stellar OC's came with the PIII-600A (Coppermine core), which many folks ran effectively as a PIII/800EB with a few keystrokes in the BIOS, (If I recall, my temps on a P3-600A went from 72F to 83F at idle with those changes)
Yeah those good old days. I really miss them.
 

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