No signal after resetting CMOS battery

Feb 7, 2019
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So, I changed some things in BIOS, I don’t remember what, but that’s ok. All I remember is changing AMD Cool and Quite off. And something little in the “CPU cell” section.
I then click “save and restart.”
It restarts, but no signal on monitor.
So, I take the RAM, and CMOS battery off then put it back on. I try it, it doesn’t work.
So, I assumed it’s my graphics card or anything else. It’s not.
I check more articles, and I saw it talked a lot about the jumper.
I see the pins, but there is only 2 and I don’t even have the “cap” for it. So that’s a no.
Also, if anyone can help, I can use the power button to turn it on, but not off.
And I tried with the “onboard” graphics, but that didn’t work either.
I’m also not an expert,so please don’t use big words I might not understand


GPU: GTX 1050
CPU: AMD FX 4300 (or something very close to that number)
Motherboard: 760GMA-P34 (FX)
 
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Dragon155

Commendable
Nov 9, 2016
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Well first off make sure the switch on the back of your power supply is on (I’ve fallen victim to that here and there). Also while you were taking that battery out, did you unplug your power supply, or was it plugged in the entire time. Third, when you turn the PC on do any fans spin or is everything just still in the case.
 
Feb 7, 2019
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Well first off make sure the switch on the back of your power supply is on (I’ve fallen victim to that here and there). Also while you were taking that battery out, did you unplug your power supply, or was it plugged in the entire time. Third, when you turn the PC on do any fans spin or is everything just still in the case.
  1. I will keep that in mind, but I think I’m good!
  2. Yes, but only once, and a different time I unplugged everything, took the battery out, replugged everything, turned computer on, then put battery in. But only once.
  3. All the fans work properly, including the GPU ones.
(Sorry I haven’t replied for a long time, I couldn’t get to this thread for a while 😅)
 
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QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
try bread boarding your system.
 
Feb 7, 2019
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try bread boarding your system.
I did exactly what it said, and there were no beeps, and the cpu fan sounds like it’s gonna explode my house, that’s how loud it is
What can I do next?
 
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QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
ONLY ONCE doesn't somehow NOT screw something up.
All it takes is "only once" for something to break, get fried, etc.

Also, now you say you messed with you GPU at some point and you heard static sounds and then the PC shut off?

That's not good either.

If you're lucky, all you need is a new motherboard.

If you're unlucky, something else alongside the motherboard is also damaged.

Could also potentially be the power supply.

Or any combination of those things.
 
Feb 7, 2019
27
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ONLY ONCE doesn't somehow NOT screw something up.
All it takes is "only once" for something to break, get fried, etc.

Also, now you say you messed with you GPU at some point and you heard static sounds and then the PC shut off?

That's not good either.

If you're lucky, all you need is a new motherboard.

If you're unlucky, something else alongside the motherboard is also damaged.

Could also potentially be the power supply.

Or any combination of those things.
Uh oh
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
yep, always power down your system and unplug it, then press and hold the power button for 10 seconds to drain the residual electricity before ever doing anything with the hardware inside of the PC.

lessons learned I guess.

I know, it's not always a thing that's made clear to new PC builders and those who teach how to build PC's and how to do stuff inside of them always seem to skip explaining that part, and I can only assume it's because they think it's common sense to not have electricity flowing through components when you go moving them around, but in reality, a lot of people don't understand how electricity works and don't really think about it at all so they end up getting caught in a moment where they do something when there's power running through the system and they pay a price for it.

Unfortunately for you, you had to learn this the hard way.

But at least now you'll always take the extra second to unplug the system and drain it before messing with anything so that it won't happen again, and that'll help you in the future.
 
Feb 7, 2019
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yep, always power down your system and unplug it, then press and hold the power button for 10 seconds to drain the residual electricity before ever doing anything with the hardware inside of the PC.

lessons learned I guess.

I know, it's not always a thing that's made clear to new PC builders and those who teach how to build PC's and how to do stuff inside of them always seem to skip explaining that part, and I can only assume it's because they think it's common sense to not have electricity flowing through components when you go moving them around, but in reality, a lot of people don't understand how electricity works and don't really think about it at all so they end up getting caught in a moment where they do something when there's power running through the system and they pay a price for it.

Unfortunately for you, you had to learn this the hard way.

But at least now you'll always take the extra second to unplug the system and drain it before messing with anything so that it won't happen again, and that'll help you in the future.
yep, always power down your system and unplug it, then press and hold the power button for 10 seconds to drain the residual electricity before ever doing anything with the hardware inside of the PC.

lessons learned I guess.

I know, it's not always a thing that's made clear to new PC builders and those who teach how to build PC's and how to do stuff inside of them always seem to skip explaining that part, and I can only assume it's because they think it's common sense to not have electricity flowing through components when you go moving them around, but in reality, a lot of people don't understand how electricity works and don't really think about it at all so they end up getting caught in a moment where they do something when there's power running through the system and they pay a price for it.

Unfortunately for you, you had to learn this the hard way.

But at least now you'll always take the extra second to unplug the system and drain it before messing with anything so that it won't happen again, and that'll help you in the future.
😭😭
So should I look for a newer version of my motherboard, in other words, what should I be looking for. I’m thinking just a newer version, or at least an MSI motherboard??
Also, I have a god knows how old motherboard downstairs, should I even attempt???
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Herald
Unless the old motherboard you have is made for that CPU that you have, then no do not attempt. Motherboard are made for the CPU itself, or more specifically the generation of CPU. Because CPUs are different across each generation built differently and using different number of pins or pads and with a different layout one CPU cannot be used on any motherboard, the motherboard are made for the CPUs as they come out. Motherboard sockets where the CPU goes into are designed around the CPU, so unless that old motherboard you have is made for your generation of CPU then no it will not work, and getting a newer version of your motherboard doesn't make any sense, there is no such thing as a newer version of whatever motherboard you have. There may be different brands that made their own version of a motherboard chipset or socket for that generation of CPU but you cannot use a newer motherboard that is made for a newer generation of CPU with your CPU oh, that's not how it works.

So if you wanted to replace the motherboard, it needs to have an AM3+ socket
 
Feb 7, 2019
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Unless the old motherboard you have is made for that CPU that you have, then no do not attempt. Motherboard are made for the CPU itself, or more specifically the generation of CPU. Because CPUs are different across each generation built differently and using different number of pins or pads and with a different layout one CPU cannot be used on any motherboard, the motherboard are made for the CPUs as they come out. Motherboard sockets where the CPU goes into are designed around the CPU, so unless that old motherboard you have is made for your generation of CPU then no it will not work, and getting a newer version of your motherboard doesn't make any sense, there is no such thing as a newer version of whatever motherboard you have. There may be different brands that made their own version of a motherboard chipset or socket for that generation of CPU but you cannot use a newer motherboard that is made for a newer generation of CPU with your CPU oh, that's not how it works.

So if you wanted to replace the motherboard, it needs to have an AM3+ socket
👍👍👍
Thank you
 

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