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No SMART information when using HD Tune?

jr61

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Jan 5, 2012
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I recently built a computer and I was going to use HD Tune to look at the hard drive. I did an error scan and there were no "damaged blocks" found. However there is not SMART information listed in the health section.

I am pretty new to building computers but is anything wrong with the hard drive? Do I need to change something in the BIOS?

Thanks!
 

jr61

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I checked the BIOS and it looks like it is turned on.

I downloaded SeaTools for windows (I have a samsung drive but I guess seagate bought the samsung drives). It has a very basic SMART test and when I ran it, it just said "Passed." So maybe HD tune just doesn't work with my drive? Maybe I don't have anything to worry about...
 
I found this on WIKIpedia.com:


Lack of common interpretation

Many motherboards display a warning message when a disk drive is approaching failure. Although an industry standard exists among most major hard drive manufacturers,[3] there are some remaining issues and much proprietary "secret knowledge" held by individual manufacturers as to their specific approach. As a result, S.M.A.R.T. is not always implemented correctly on many computer platforms, due to the absence of industry-wide software and hardware standards for S.M.A.R.T. data interchange.[citation needed]

From a legal perspective, the term "S.M.A.R.T." refers only to a signaling method between internal disk drive electromechanical sensors and the host computer. Hence, a drive may be claimed by its manufacturers to implement S.M.A.R.T. even if it does not include, say, a temperature sensor, which the customer might reasonably expect to be present. Moreover, in the most extreme case, a disk manufacturer could, in theory, produce a drive which includes a sensor for just one physical attribute, and then legally advertise the product as "S.M.A.R.T. compatible".
 

jr61

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This is interesting, thanks. I thought it was some type of standard...
 

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