Question No Sound coming from Front or Back Headphone ports (Only static)

Apr 6, 2020
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Today I took out a WiFi PCIE card from my PC. It was powered off when doing this and was very simple and I had no problems. Once I powered on my PC my headphones were making an odd sound, almost like a dirty old record sound effect. They are no longer being detected by my PC on both ports. (Front and back) I have verified that my headphones and the cord are working properly by testing on my monitors built in jack, and sound works fine. I already tried updating the drivers as well but with no success. I also checked if there were any apparent loose or unplugged wires. Only one I can see that is unplugged is a 4 pin plug that says "16W17" There are two of those on the bottom of my case that are unplugged. I really appropriate the help!
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
It is not clear whether the sounds worked as you expect before you made your change. But let's get to another item.

You have both video and audio at your monitor. How is that done? Is the video cable (HDMI, I assume) coming from the back panel of your MOBO, or from an output on a VIDEO card in a PCIe slot? Do you have any additional cables from your computer to the monitor, like some audio lines from the mobo back panel to the monitor?

Here is why I ask. There is no standard way for the audio output from a chip on your mobo to be routed to an added video card in a PCIe slot. But so many systems now use such an added card and an HDMI cable to connect from the card to the monitor, so the dilemma is how to get sound to the monitor, too? Video card makers have an easy solution on virtually all new cards. The include their own audio output chip on the video card and create the sound there so it can be on the HDMI cable.

Now add this factor. Windows can use only ONE sound output device at a time, no matter how many devices you have in your system. So if you have a video card, when its video drivers first were installed, the Install procees VERY probaly also installed that card' s audio device driver AND changed the Windows configuration to use that chip as its default sound output device. So all sound is coming from the HDMI cable on the video card, and any audio chip on your mobo is NOT being used to send signals out of the mobo's rear panel jacks OR the front panel jacks.

You can undo this common arrangement and have audio sent out by the mobo chip if you choose. To do that, you must first connect audio signal cables from your mobo's rear panel jack to inputs on your monitor so the signal can get there. Do you have that already? If so, THEN you must change Windows' Default Sound Playback Device. Go into Start ... Sounds and find where that device is shown, There is a drop-down mini-window that likely shows it is using the video card's system. Click on that and change it to your mobo's system, likely by Realtek, then back out. Check that your monitor is set to use its RCA audio input jacks for its sound source, rather than relying on an HDMI signal source. This should get you sounds at both front panel and rear speaker jacks AND sounds at your Monitor.

Now, IF you do not have the stuff to do that and need to keep sound going to the moonitor via the HDMI cable, simply plug your headphones into the audio output jack on the MONITOR. You already know that works. Additional item, though: the headset may include a microphoine with its own separate plug that goes into the Mic input jack on the mobo's rear panel. There is NO way to make that connection through the monitor. Within those same Windows configuration windows there is another for its Default Sound Source, and you should ensure that it is set to use the mobo audio system for that fucntion.
 
Reactions: MrManVan
Apr 6, 2020
4
0
10
0
It is not clear whether the sounds worked as you expect before you made your change. But let's get to another item.

You have both video and audio at your monitor. How is that done? Is the video cable (HDMI, I assume) coming from the back panel of your MOBO, or from an output on a VIDEO card in a PCIe slot? Do you have any additional cables from your computer to the monitor, like some audio lines from the mobo back panel to the monitor?

Here is why I ask. There is no standard way for the audio output from a chip on your mobo to be routed to an added video card in a PCIe slot. But so many systems now use such an added card and an HDMI cable to connect from the card to the monitor, so the dilemma is how to get sound to the monitor, too? Video card makers have an easy solution on virtually all new cards. The include their own audio output chip on the video card and create the sound there so it can be on the HDMI cable.

Now add this factor. Windows can use only ONE sound output device at a time, no matter how many devices you have in your system. So if you have a video card, when its video drivers first were installed, the Install procees VERY probaly also installed that card' s audio device driver AND changed the Windows configuration to use that chip as its default sound output device. So all sound is coming from the HDMI cable on the video card, and any audio chip on your mobo is NOT being used to send signals out of the mobo's rear panel jacks OR the front panel jacks.

You can undo this common arrangement and have audio sent out by the mobo chip if you choose. To do that, you must first connect audio signal cables from your mobo's rear panel jack to inputs on your monitor so the signal can get there. Do you have that already? If so, THEN you must change Windows' Default Sound Playback Device. Go into Start ... Sounds and find where that device is shown, There is a drop-down mini-window that likely shows it is using the video card's system. Click on that and change it to your mobo's system, likely by Realtek, then back out. Check that your monitor is set to use its RCA audio input jacks for its sound source, rather than relying on an HDMI signal source. This should get you sounds at both front panel and rear speaker jacks AND sounds at your Monitor.

Now, IF you do not have the stuff to do that and need to keep sound going to the moonitor via the HDMI cable, simply plug your headphones into the audio output jack on the MONITOR. You already know that works. Additional item, though: the headset may include a microphoine with its own separate plug that goes into the Mic input jack on the mobo's rear panel. There is NO way to make that connection through the monitor. Within those same Windows configuration windows there is another for its Default Sound Source, and you should ensure that it is set to use the mobo audio system for that fucntion.
Thank you for your reply. To answer your first questions. My monitor is plugged in to my Geforce card Via Display-Port. There are no other audio cables running from the back of my monitor into my PC other than the one Display-Port cord. I'm not sure if the issue is coming of correctly. I don't want the audio to be routed from my mother board to my monitor. I just used my monitor as the example that my headphones are working correctly. Although this could be me being thick witted. The problem is connecting my headphones into the audio jack and not receiving any audio, or even showing up as a device in windows. When I unplug the "Front panel Audio Connector (10-1 pin AAFP) the static stops since the front Aux port is disconnected. I'm just worried there is some kind of electrical interference or a motherboard malfunction going on. When my headphones are connected to the rear Aux panel I can't set it as default since it shows up as discontented.
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
So I conclude that you do want sound to come out of the front panel jacks for your headset. Further, any other sound (like, a speaker set) should come out of the rear panel jacks from your mobo, and you do NOT want sound sent to your monitor in either fashion.

So that's easy. You simply need to re-connect the front jacks to the mobo "Front panel Audio Connector" (10-1 pin AAFP) so the signals from the mobo audio chip can be fed out the front jacks. THEN you must change Windows' Default Sound Playback Device. Go into Start ... Sounds and find where that device is shown, There is a drop-down mini-window that likely shows it is using the video card's system. Click on that and change it to your mobo's system, likely by Realtek, then back out.

That will set your system to create sounds using the mobo audio chip and send them out your front panel jacks and the mobo rear panel sound jacks. BUT you could still have a problem of no sound there anyway, especially at the rear jacks. This can happen because of a feature of Realtek audio systems (the most common on mobos) called Port Re-assignment. Sometimes disconnecting and re-connecting speakers at the jacks leaves the Realtek system completely unable to send out sounds. IF you do have sounds OK from the jacks, ignore the rest of this. But IF you still have no sounds coming out of rear jacks, follow this sequence I posted in another thread.
  1. Most Realtek systems have a useful feature called Port Re-assignment that allows you to change which sound signal is sent out of which rear panel port. But it can cause you trouble in this situation because it demands that you give it answers, or it cuts off your sound! So we'll use that to get the rear panels audio jacks to what you need. Some of the details depends on exactly what your sound playback system is - how many speakers, for example. I have a 5.1 Surround Sound system consisting of two front stereo speakers, one front centre speaker and one subWoofer, and two rear stereo speakers, and these require using three of the output jacks, plus a jack for microphone input. I also use an earphone / microphone headset plugged into my front panel jacks.
  2. Arrange your system so that you can reach the rear panel and the cables / plugs to your speakers PLUS see your screen and use your keyboard and mouse. On your screen at bottom right there should be an icon for access to your Realtek sound configuration utility that allows you to set many options and run a sound test. Use that and, if possible, set it to the speaker system you have - 2-channel stereo, 2.1 sound, 5.1 Surround Sound, 7.1, whatever. Also enable the front earphone and microphone jacks if you plan to use them. You MAY not be able to set all this if your actual speakers etc are not plugged in and working yet - we'll come back to them later. Back out of the Realtek tool.
  3. Unplug everything from your mobo audio output jacks - the two on the front, and all the AUDIO items plugged into your mobo back panel. Reboot your machine, and it will recognize that you have nothing plugged in for sound output.
  4. From here on we'll be repeating a simple sequence that means you need to respond to messages on your screen, ONE item at a time. Start with the plug for your two front (left / right) stereo speakers. Plug that into the correct rear panel jack (usually light green) and watch the screen. You should see a little window pop up saying it detected that an item was plugged into that jack, and suggesting what that might be. It is probably correct, but you can NOT just ignore that and let it be. If you do not answer, it will NOT assume its correct guess, and it will NOT send out any sound there. You must answer by confirming that guess or changing it, and the window will disappear.
  5. On to the next thing to plug in - perhaps the plug for a front centre and subWoofer in the orange jack. Same process - watch for the window and confirm the correct speaker type you just plugged in there.
  6. IF you have more, as I do, repeat. When you have all your speaker items plugged in, do the microphone jack, too. Or you may be doing that on your front panel.
  7. When you have ALL your speakers etc. re-connected this way, go back into the Realtek configuration utility. Check and adjust the choice of speaker system you are using, and any settings for headphones. Now find the sound test tool and run that to be sure all your speakers are doing as planned. If necessary, you can adjust things like balance and volume settings. When you're done, exit the Realtek utility.
That should get your sound back to the way it was.
 
Reactions: MrManVan and Sk8ter
Apr 6, 2020
4
0
10
0
So I conclude that you do want sound to come out of the front panel jacks for your headset. Further, any other sound (like, a speaker set) should come out of the rear panel jacks from your mobo, and you do NOT want sound sent to your monitor in either fashion.

So that's easy. You simply need to re-connect the front jacks to the mobo "Front panel Audio Connector" (10-1 pin AAFP) so the signals from the mobo audio chip can be fed out the front jacks. THEN you must change Windows' Default Sound Playback Device. Go into Start ... Sounds and find where that device is shown, There is a drop-down mini-window that likely shows it is using the video card's system. Click on that and change it to your mobo's system, likely by Realtek, then back out.

That will set your system to create sounds using the mobo audio chip and send them out your front panel jacks and the mobo rear panel sound jacks. BUT you could still have a problem of no sound there anyway, especially at the rear jacks. This can happen because of a feature of Realtek audio systems (the most common on mobos) called Port Re-assignment. Sometimes disconnecting and re-connecting speakers at the jacks leaves the Realtek system completely unable to send out sounds. IF you do have sounds OK from the jacks, ignore the rest of this. But IF you still have no sounds coming out of rear jacks, follow this sequence I posted in another thread.
  1. Most Realtek systems have a useful feature called Port Re-assignment that allows you to change which sound signal is sent out of which rear panel port. But it can cause you trouble in this situation because it demands that you give it answers, or it cuts off your sound! So we'll use that to get the rear panels audio jacks to what you need. Some of the details depends on exactly what your sound playback system is - how many speakers, for example. I have a 5.1 Surround Sound system consisting of two front stereo speakers, one front centre speaker and one subWoofer, and two rear stereo speakers, and these require using three of the output jacks, plus a jack for microphone input. I also use an earphone / microphone headset plugged into my front panel jacks.
  2. Arrange your system so that you can reach the rear panel and the cables / plugs to your speakers PLUS see your screen and use your keyboard and mouse. On your screen at bottom right there should be an icon for access to your Realtek sound configuration utility that allows you to set many options and run a sound test. Use that and, if possible, set it to the speaker system you have - 2-channel stereo, 2.1 sound, 5.1 Surround Sound, 7.1, whatever. Also enable the front earphone and microphone jacks if you plan to use them. You MAY not be able to set all this if your actual speakers etc are not plugged in and working yet - we'll come back to them later. Back out of the Realtek tool.
  3. Unplug everything from your mobo audio output jacks - the two on the front, and all the AUDIO items plugged into your mobo back panel. Reboot your machine, and it will recognize that you have nothing plugged in for sound output.
  4. From here on we'll be repeating a simple sequence that means you need to respond to messages on your screen, ONE item at a time. Start with the plug for your two front (left / right) stereo speakers. Plug that into the correct rear panel jack (usually light green) and watch the screen. You should see a little window pop up saying it detected that an item was plugged into that jack, and suggesting what that might be. It is probably correct, but you can NOT just ignore that and let it be. If you do not answer, it will NOT assume its correct guess, and it will NOT send out any sound there. You must answer by confirming that guess or changing it, and the window will disappear.
  5. On to the next thing to plug in - perhaps the plug for a front centre and subWoofer in the orange jack. Same process - watch for the window and confirm the correct speaker type you just plugged in there.
  6. IF you have more, as I do, repeat. When you have all your speaker items plugged in, do the microphone jack, too. Or you may be doing that on your front panel.
  7. When you have ALL your speakers etc. re-connected this way, go back into the Realtek configuration utility. Check and adjust the choice of speaker system you are using, and any settings for headphones. Now find the sound test tool and run that to be sure all your speakers are doing as planned. If necessary, you can adjust things like balance and volume settings. When you're done, exit the Realtek utility.
That should get your sound back to the way it was.
Thank you so much for your easy to follow instructions. I followed each step until after the restart when you said to plug in my headphones and wait for it to detect them. I plugged them into the green port on the back of my PC and it immediately detected. I clicked that I was headphones and then the static started again. After that, I kept getting the notification spamming me on my screen that I had connected and disconnected my device repeatedly until I unplug the headphones. I'm starting to think something is just glitching out.
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
You are right. What you describe sounds like the connections in the headphone set are intermittent. That MIGHT be in the headphone set - in the plug on the cable end, or in the wiring, or inside the earpieces. If that were the case, you should have similar noisy static no matter where you plug in that headset. But the problem also could be the jack on the back panel you plugged into. In that case, the problem likely would happen only at that jack.
 
Apr 6, 2020
4
0
10
0
You are right. What you describe sounds like the connections in the headphone set are intermittent. That MIGHT be in the headphone set - in the plug on the cable end, or in the wiring, or inside the earpieces. If that were the case, you should have similar noisy static no matter where you plug in that headset. But the problem also could be the jack on the back panel you plugged into. In that case, the problem likely would happen only at that jack.
My headphones work fine when plugged into anything else. Sadly it doesn't work even on the remote mounted front panel. Just static and not even any detection when I follow your steps. Does that sound like a Warranty problem with the Motherboard?
 

Paperdoc

Glorious
Ambassador
Yes, it does. Having one bad jack (socket) on either the rear light green (front stereo speaker output) or the front light green (earphones) position is conceivable, although still a defect. (I note the front panel jacks are not part of the mobo, but the Front Panel header is.) But having BOTH show exactly the same problem indicates a failure elsewhere on the mobo that feeds all outputs. Just as a further confirmation, I suggest you get a different earphone set and plug it into each of those output jacks to verify that it is NOT a problem with the headset itself. If that says no headset or earphone problem, then I agree you should contact Tech Support for your mobo about a warranty replacement.
 
Reactions: MrManVan

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