[SOLVED] Non XMP Overclocking

Aug 8, 2021
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I'm still don't understand about ram overclocking
Just straight to the point

For example
  • Ryzen 3 4100
  • Asus A320M-K
(Both of them support up to 3200Mhz)

What if i'm using a Value Ram that rated speed at 2666Mhz and it doesn't have XMP Support? Can i overclock it over 2666Mhz?

) Does any ram can be overclock if the motherboard and processor support it?
) Should i go XMP or non XMP Memory?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You can't do anything past 3200mhz anyhow so the best option would be to simply buy a memory kit, preferably with two DIMMs in a matched set, not two separate DIMMs of the same part number, since that is what that board supports with that CPU. Yes, you want memory that is either listed as compatible for that board on the memory manufacturers compatibility list or on the motherboard manufacturer's QVL list. Generally any worthwhile memory these days will have XMP or A-XMP profiles and I'd avoid any memory that doesn't have a suitable profile. If it's on one of the compatibility lists, like the G.Skill memory configurator or Corsair memory finder, or the QVL, then it should both be compatible and have a suitable profile.

No, you do not want to try overclocking that Value RAM past it's rated speed. It's a bad idea and very unlikely to offer any benefits.
 
Reactions: CountMike

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
You can't do anything past 3200mhz anyhow so the best option would be to simply buy a memory kit, preferably with two DIMMs in a matched set, not two separate DIMMs of the same part number, since that is what that board supports with that CPU. Yes, you want memory that is either listed as compatible for that board on the memory manufacturers compatibility list or on the motherboard manufacturer's QVL list. Generally any worthwhile memory these days will have XMP or A-XMP profiles and I'd avoid any memory that doesn't have a suitable profile. If it's on one of the compatibility lists, like the G.Skill memory configurator or Corsair memory finder, or the QVL, then it should both be compatible and have a suitable profile.

No, you do not want to try overclocking that Value RAM past it's rated speed. It's a bad idea and very unlikely to offer any benefits.
 
Reactions: CountMike

egda23

Estimable
Nobody is going to say "sure you can".
There is absolutely no guarantee that overclocking will work. It might but if it does not you simply waste money.
Heck, it is even sometimes difficult to reach published max speed for RAM sticks !
If these memory modules could reach higher speeds, they would likely have been binned for higher speed RAM sticks
 
Reactions: CountMike

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Overclocking of memory should be reserved for memory that is of a higher grade, such as enthusiast models like G.Skill Ripjaws or Trident Z, or Corsair Dominator Platinum and some of the Vengeance models, or really any higher end memory module with heatsinks. Any memory that lacks heatsinks should absolutely NOT be considered to be a good option for overclocking. And, if you have ANY intention of overclocking the memory it would be a very good idea to read the last few paragraphs at least, and preferably the entire article, at the following link, specifically the sections on stability testing. And then, maybe also do a little more investigation into it as well, because it's not a great idea to "overclock" memory if you do not 100% absolutely know what you are doing. Doing so can result in eventual catastrophic file errors if you have used the system for any amount of time while the memory configuration was not suitably stable. Stability is the the primary concern here.

Please read the following guide and then you might make further determinations based on your findings.

 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
There's 2 ways to make 2666MHz ram. The first is to take new silicon chips, test it to see if it's stable at 2666MHz, put a sticker on it and add it to the batch that was demanded by the buyer. The second is to take silicon from a batch that failed a higher speed demand, like 3200MHz, and test it to see if it'll pass 2666MHz instead.

With the first batch, the top end is unknown, it might OC to 4000 for all anyone knows, it's never been tested for maximums. With the second batch, the top end is known, somewhat, as it failed a higher speed at least once. None but the factory have any clue what that might be, it might have been 2800MHz, so any OC applied to those sticks will be doomed to failure.

Heatsinks. Value ram does not have any. Simply meaning that an xmp (eXtreme Memory Profile) that will change a 1.2v ram to 1.35v ram, is going to create higher heat loads when used. Without the ability to dissipate that heat, the ram cooks, and there's no temp sensors on it. So value ram won't have an XMP profile. It'll use standard jadec tables and run the best speeds allowed by the processor, like 2133/2400 or 2666MHz.

You can try to overclock it manually, you can try to tighten timings, but with value ram runs a much higher than normal chance of failure, errors, damage if OC is implemented.

All due to excessive heat, excessive voltages, lousy binned silicon or even substandard silicon. It's one of situations where 'Yes you can', but conventional wisdom says 'You really shouldn't'.
 

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