Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang Emails Thanks to Employees

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tipoo

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[citation][nom]alterecho[/nom]The question is, why AMD is not reducing the prices of the 7970??[/citation]

Give it a bit more than a single day.
 

raidenfox123

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Price reduction's will come. Also for the people that will argue that when overclocked they perform similarly, remember. Not everyone is willing to OC there video cards. Also wait till EGVA debuts there Classified with the 14 Phase PWM, and it OC's like a beast! :D Can't wait.
 

hfitch

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[citation][nom]theconsolegamer[/nom]"GeForce GTX 680 is now the fastest single-GPU graphics card, and not by a margin that leaves room to hem or haw" This is BS. Chris Angelini's a beast but like almost any other reviewer out there he let the Radeon at stock while the GTX 680 autoclocks itself. The 7970 and the GTX 680 are equally fast, they trade blows across the board and none can be called faster, period. Misleading review is misleading.[/citation] He was talking power consumption to bits per second ratio. There isnt any other card out there that gives this amount of power per watt.
 

ern88

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[citation][nom]hfitch[/nom]He was talking power consumption to bits per second ratio. There isnt any other card out there that gives this amount of power per watt.[/citation]
Plus it's cheaper then the HD 7970 as well!!!!
 
[citation][nom]theconsolegamer[/nom]"GeForce GTX 680 is now the fastest single-GPU graphics card, and not by a margin that leaves room to hem or haw" This is BS. Chris Angelini's a beast but like almost any other reviewer out there he let the Radeon at stock while the GTX 680 autoclocks itself. The 7970 and the GTX 680 are equally fast, they trade blows across the board and none can be called faster, period. Misleading review is misleading.[/citation]
There is consensus across reviews on many reputable sites (tomshardware, anandtech, hardocp, overclockersclub, etc...) exhibiting the performance advantage of the 680 over the 7970. This is not only on a single display, but also across 3-display configurations.

At one time, you could say you'd get near Nvidia performance at a lower price if you went with AMD. Now there is no advantage to owning a 7970 other than you can tell people you spent $50-100 more for lower performance. Maybe AMD is going for the Apple angle with this generation of GPUs?
 

JackFrost860

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"Today the GTX680 is on the shelf around the world". Today you can't buy one for love nor money, would have been a more correct statement.
 

raidenfox123

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[citation][nom]theconsolegamer[/nom]"GeForce GTX 680 is now the fastest single-GPU graphics card, and not by a margin that leaves room to hem or haw" This is BS. Chris Angelini's a beast but like almost any other reviewer out there he let the Radeon at stock while the GTX 680 autoclocks itself. The 7970 and the GTX 680 are equally fast, they trade blows across the board and none can be called faster, period. Misleading review is misleading.[/citation]

Trading blows? That would suggest that the 7970 out performed the GTX 680 in multiple game benchmarks, when in fact it did not. It beat it in 1/3 of 1 test! And as stated this is a "Gaming" Card, not a compute card so it would be pointless to take into factor results that are not game benchmarks. And there is more to come, I'm sure that more power can be pushed out of these cards. The TDP is running around 175w? With 2 6pins, wait till company's like MSI and EVGA start putting a larger PWM and thermal design into these things. I'm sure you'll see that marge go UP very fast. Right now were looking at a 13% increase in performance average over the 7970, wait a few months till the non reference boards come out and we will see where that increase is.
 

omnimodis78

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This is a very disingenuous "thank you" letter. It reads more (entirely) like an advertising campaign. I am pro-nvidia, and find the technology that Kepler represents very intriguing, but from a strictly business management perspective, such 'thank you' internal memos are inappropriate and condescending. It shows that management, or in this case the CEO, doesn't really feel much gratitude or appreciation at all, but is merely pushing the advertising machine. A sincere thank you letter focuses on the effort of the employees, not the product.
 

bourgeoisdude

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[citation][nom]hfitch[/nom]He was talking power consumption to bits per second ratio. There isnt any other card out there that gives this amount of power per watt.[/citation]

No he wasn't. The GTX680 is faster than the 7970 in nearly every gaming performance test. It's not even close.
 

The_King

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What Nvidia promised the GTX 680 to be and what they gave the public is two different things (GTX 670 Ti) cause the 7970 is not fast has Nvidia expected it to be. I will still stick with my 5970
 

CaedenV

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[citation][nom]alterecho[/nom]The question is, why AMD is not reducing the prices of the 7970??[/citation]
1) as stated above: it takes more than one day for a large company to react to changes in the market. Partly because they are big, slow, and cumbersome, and partly because if they were trading blows on a day-by-day basis you would never know when to jump in and make a purchase. Consistent expectations with the occasional sale/rebate sell more cards than a paranoid market.

2) They may not be able to: 7970 is much like the 580 was. It is a compute card with a gaming driver. My 570 is the same way, and I would not have purchased an nVidia last time around except that I use software that requires a 570 for accelerated rendering. If AMD plays their cards right (lol) then they will be able to steal a TON of business from the workstation GPU market which is completely and entirely owned by nVidia at the moment (because nVidia has better support for software developers, something AMD has yet to learn) in spite of the higher markups. Add to that all of the production issues (remember the 7970 was supposed to be out in November but due to bad batches, which are expensive, they pushed it back to Feb), the normal development/advertising cost, and the fact that it is a bigger (more expensive) GPU than the 680, they may be stuck at the price they are at for a little while.

3) You cannot get a 680, and there are not cheaper cards out yet, so if there is no available competition then why lower the price?: As with all fresh releases, all of the 680s are sold out, and will be hard to come by for a little while. Sure, diehard nVidia fans, and performance benchmarkers are going to wait for it to be available, but the average Joe is going to note that after an OC both cards are of similar performance and either figure that $50 isn't worth loosing sleep over, or simply buy the 7950 which is cheaper, but still no slouch. The point being; If you wanted to buy a card yesterday, then you got the 680. If you have to buy a card today (either because it is for work, or because you are a child who lacks patients) then you have no choice but to buy the AMD option. In a month when cards are radially available price drops will become more of an option. Also once the full product line of 600 cards is released over the next few months and nVidia is killing AMD in more price brackets THEN we will see prices drop a little.
 

CaedenV

Splendid

This is dumb. These product launches are planned out WAY in advance, and nVidia decided to remove the compute support of the 680 long before they knew what the benchmarks would be for the 7970. Remember, these things were in the fab process for 6-12 months now trying to get 28nm to work properly, which means the die has been set for most of that time. It is far more likely that nVidia simply looked at the profit margins of their Quadro and Tesla cards, and then looked at their 500 lineup and realized that there are plenty of power users like me who were more than happy with the 570's CUDA support for Adobe CS5, but who don't really game all that much. If it was not for the 570 for $300 (Paid $275 for mine after sale and rebate :) ) then I would have had to purchase a $600 Quadro card to do the same workload (granted, a faster driver, and ecc is thrown in there, but still not worth 2x the price for what I do when there is a cheaper option), and nVidia would have gotten an extra few hundred $$ out of me had the 570 been a game-only card. So in short, that is why the compute performance sucks, because they are trying to differentiate their game cards from their professional cards. Plus by making it more purpose built they can save on die space, keep profits higher, temps cooler, etc. I know everyone is waiting for the 'real' performance king with the wider busses and the higher compute rate to come out, but I think this time around that is going to be reserved for the much more expensive professional cards, and for gaming it will not perform much better than the 680 they just released.

If you think about it, it was a brilliant move. Have a multipurpose GPU to get the entry-level professionals like myself hooked on hardware acceleration, get all of the software support from the big production software companies, and then take away the cheap option a few years later when we are all ready to upgrade again. It worked so well that AMD is now taking the same route. Previously AMD has SUCKED for professional use (with the exception of excellent multi-monitor support that could only be rivaled by Matrox... who is a tiny little company, and not really much of a competitor) not so much because their GPUs were bad, but because the could not get community support. But the new 7000 series is absolutely mindblowing for production work which will attract the entry-level "prosumers", and if they can get the support of places like Adobe, Maya, and other big multimedia companies to push their cards then it could be a huge upset for nVidia who has traditionally dominated that market.

I think that this shows a general direction that AMD is headed as a whole; Gamers (well... most gamers) do not have money, and it is very expensive to be 'the best' in that market, and there is not much profit in being the !/$ king. So now we saw Bulldozer, which while a flawed product, has a great vision of architecture for media and many-thread applications... but not really a gaming monster. If they figure themselves out on the next go-around then they could easily win me over from Intel for production work as they would be much cheaper than the SB-E/IB-E series while still providing a high thread count... again, not games. Now we see the GPU side following suit; The 7970 is no slouch for gaming, but to say that games are the focus of the card design is silly. The big focus was on the pro market and making a good production card. If they pull it off then they could find an excellent new niche to save them from ever better integrated graphics on the low end, and companies that do not have a CPU division bleeding money on the high end. And, lets face it, while PC gaming is not going to disappear any time soon, the mass market is in consoles, and it will only get worse when the next gen is released and can really do 1080p gaming right on a TV, which will pull a lot of budget gamers away from the more expensive PC gaming market. So that knocks out GPU sales on the low end, and GPU sales in the middle. What is left is the high end gaming market which has stiff competition with nVidia, and the pro market which they have largely neglected in the past. But with the other 2 traditional cash cows under major threat of drying up, I think AMD graphics is trying to break into the only market that they have left to explore.

In short; No nVidia gave us exactly what they promised: a kick-ass gaming card that yields higher profits while still offering a lower price to consumers and keeping with the 20-30% performance increase we expect over the previous gen high-end chip. This will also fuel the sales of their higher end product lines when the new quadro cards arrive. If nVidia is successful at this model (which AMD has tried for years without success) then it means they get higher profits to sit on for more R&D and patent purchasing power, but now that AMD is following nVidia's old way of doing business there could be much stiffer competition across the board, which will make things much more interesting for the next set of cards to come in 1.5-2 years.

Lastly, the 680 is a refresh of the 560 not the 570 (570 is a dumbed down 580, but still based on the 580), AND this is a firmi refresh/die shrink, not an entirely new architecture. So look at the benchmarks of the 560 vs the 680 to do your comparisons... this is quite simply the largest increase in horsepower between generations EVER. Period. Without exception. End of story. It is absolutely amazing what they managed to do, and while I still stand by my earlier statement of the GK114 potentially not being that much better for games than the GK104 is, I think that it will hold something truly special for the pro markets that just might make all of the executives at AMD cry, and make their engineers bow down in worship. Sure, I could be wrong on this one, but after seeing what they did with the 560, I could only imagine what they manage to do with the GK114 which is based off of the 580/GF114. Not to mention the rumors of AMD and nVidia both getting ready to release duel GPU setups within the next few months.
I am personally quite happy with my little 570 and will not be upgrading for a long time (typically 4 years), but it is really exciting and fun to watch all this new tech come down the pipe.
 
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