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Question NVidia GTX geforce 1050Ti

Jul 8, 2020
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Helo there,
I own a MSi GF63 thin 9RCX which has an Nvidia geforce gtx 1050ti. My problem dues to the fact that my laptop doesnt have either DVI or DisplayPort outputs,, but when i searched my graphics card, i noticed that it had both. I also purchased a Benq Zowie Xl2411 p (144hz), but the HDMI limits it to 60hz. Id like to listen any suggestion as regards this problem, whether it is buying a hdmi/Dp converter or opening the laptop and look what outputs my graphics card actually has.
Thanks, Thomas.
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Ambassador
dedicated graphics cards in a PC are different than in a laptop.
The GPU itself is just a processor like the CPU, and it's slapped onto a circuit board with power VRMs and RAM for it just like the PC.

But in a laptop, they take the GPU and add it into the laptop and make it share RAM with the laptop a lot of times.

Since it's integrated onto the motherboard in the laptop and not it's own card, it of course doesn't have it's own dedicated display output ports.

You have to use the HDMI on the laptop, and the laptop will passthrough graphics that are rendered on the GPU.

The GPU will only be used for rendering when the application being run calls for it to be used.
The laptop will switch between using the GPU and the one on the CPU depending on the graphical load (such as playing a video game)

And the HDMI output is only capable of whatever the laptop manufacturer has made it capable of.
In most cases it's 60Hz.
But it depends as well on the monitor and if it's capable of high refresh rates over HDMI.
Check monitor OSD settings for setting a refresh rate, and check nvidia control panel for setting refresh rate on the monitor.
It's different with the screen built in, since that is connected and wired directly to the graphics in the system and will run at whatever refresh rate it's designed for (i.e. if it's a high refresh rate monitor built into the laptop)
 
Jun 4, 2020
10
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10
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dedicated graphics cards in a PC are different than in a laptop.
The GPU itself is just a processor like the CPU, and it's slapped onto a circuit board with power VRMs and RAM for it just like the PC.

But in a laptop, they take the GPU and add it into the laptop and make it share RAM with the laptop a lot of times.

Since it's integrated onto the motherboard in the laptop and not it's own card, it of course doesn't have it's own dedicated display output ports.

You have to use the HDMI on the laptop, and the laptop will passthrough graphics that are rendered on the GPU.

The GPU will only be used for rendering when the application being run calls for it to be used.
The laptop will switch between using the GPU and the one on the CPU depending on the graphical load (such as playing a video game)

And the HDMI output is only capable of whatever the laptop manufacturer has made it capable of.
In most cases it's 60Hz.
But it depends as well on the monitor and if it's capable of high refresh rates over HDMI.
Check monitor OSD settings for setting a refresh rate, and check nvidia control panel for setting refresh rate on the monitor.
It's different with the screen built in, since that is connected and wired directly to the graphics in the system and will run at whatever refresh rate it's designed for (i.e. if it's a high refresh rate monitor built into the laptop)
but, how can he do it?
 

QwerkyPengwen

Dignified
Ambassador
I spelled it out pretty clearly.
you have the the 1050 Ti GPU, but you don't have the rest of the stuff that comes with an actual graphics card (key word "card")
It's possible your laptop can support higher refresh rates over HDMI, but you have to make sure your monitor supports higher refresh rates over HDMI, and check that you don't have to enable higher refresh rates in the monitor settings, and double check settings under the resolution section in the Nvidia control panel.

Worst case scenario your laptop doesn't support higher refresh rates over HDMI and/or the monitor doesn't support higher refresh rates over HDMI.

But you should double check any monitor and nvidia control panel settings.

Using an adapter doesn't do you any good when trying to get higher refresh rates 90% of the time.
Especially if you want to use adaptive sync (FreeSync or G-Sync) since those need direct cable connections and using an adapter makes it not work.
 

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