Question NVME reliability - Kingston DC1000B 480GB vs Gigabyte AORUS 500GB

adriantnt

Distinguished
Apr 4, 2012
7
0
18,510
0
I am looking at these two NVME SSD:

Kingston DC1000B 480GB PCI Express 3.0 x4 M.2 2280
part: SEDC1000BM8/480G

and

Gigabyte AORUS 500GB, NVMe Gen4
part: GP-ASM2NE6500GTTD

Which one would be more reliable in terms of keeping it's performance after many writes ?

I want to use them in computers that will be on all the time, running MySQL databases.
Database is around 20 GB and would be written many times, maybe 10 GB of new writes/updates a day.

Kingston says this nvme is made for enterprise environment so that is a plus, Gigabyte on the other hand says it has wear leveling and other technologies that might help with reliability in my case.
Performance specs are better for the Gigabyte, but I assume the Kingston slower write has to do with being optimize for stability over time. 500MB/s should be still OK for me.
If it matters, I plan to use them with ASUS PRIME B550M-K motherboards with Ryzen CPUs, one is Ryzen™ 7 3700X, another is Ryzen 5 3600. And 64GB DDR 4 memory.

It is not critical if they fail and I lose all the data, but I don't want them to be wrong for this setup and constantly fail every 1-2 months.
I have some SATA Kingstons that show they are at "10%" lifespan left, different use (not database), but still, I want to avoid that.

Both cost around 120-130 USD here. Which one to chose ? If there is a more solid choice, I am considering looking at others.

EDIT: Kingston also seems to have ram cache chips (from what I can tell), and I see the same PHISON chip/controller.

Kingston: img1 img2
 
Last edited:

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
The Gigabyte has a TBW of 850 while the Kingston has half that. If you're looking at only writes, then Gigabyte. If you're looking at a drive failure over time, which would be MTBF, then Kingston gets the vote, then again Kingston tend to advertise a lot of things on their stuff and come up short most times.
 
Reactions: adriantnt

Maxxify

Distinguished
Two completely different drives. If you need steady state performance, enterprise will be better. Enterprise/DC also has power loss protection (PLP) so will generally have better reliability. The lack of caching can increase endurance also along with higher OP, but again this is an enterprise feature.
 
Reactions: adriantnt

lvt

Prominent
Apr 19, 2021
981
156
590
14
I have both Kingston and Gigabyte SSD so both brands appears equally good to me.

But in this case the Gigabyte is clearly superior in terms of cooling and caching memory (if it's your main boot drive then having DRAM cache is a huge plus).
 
Reactions: adriantnt

adriantnt

Distinguished
Apr 4, 2012
7
0
18,510
0
[...] The lack of caching can increase endurance also along with higher OP, but again this is an enterprise feature.
I don't understand what you and @lvt mentioned about caching, one SSD has RAM caching on it and one doesn't ? If so, I don't know which one does. I didn't find much info about this. (Gigabyte site is offline for me now thou).

Edit: I think they both have ram cache and use that Phison chip/controller.
Kingston: img1 img2
 
Last edited:

Maxxify

Distinguished
I don't understand what you and @lvt mentioned about caching, one SSD has RAM caching on it and one doesn't ? If so, I don't know which one does. I didn't find much info about this. (Gigabyte site is offline for me now thou).

Edit: I think they both have ram cache and use that Phison chip/controller.
Kingston: img1 img2
SLC caching. SLC is a write cache, DRAM is not; it's used for metadata instead. SLC caching is faster than native flash but you're trading capacity for it, as 1 bit of SLC takes up an entire 3-bit TLC cell for example. So your drive has to empty the SLC then convert it to TLC (or back to SLC) when you're doing sustained writes. This actually increases wear and reduces performance. Enterprise/DC drives have no SLC cache specifically to improve steady state (sustained) performance and endurance.
 
Reactions: adriantnt

adriantnt

Distinguished
Apr 4, 2012
7
0
18,510
0
I already had 2 Kingston ordered, I will probably get 2 Gigabyte too (because I need 4) and see how they perform over time.

If anyone is interested, this is how the Kingston performs on PCIe 3.0 x4 and PCIe 4.0 x4. Two motherboards, I wrote them on the window.



 

lvt

Prominent
Apr 19, 2021
981
156
590
14
I don't understand what you and @lvt mentioned about caching, one SSD has RAM caching on it and one doesn't ? If so, I don't know which one does. I didn't find much info about this. (Gigabyte site is offline for me now thou).

Edit: I think they both have ram cache and use that Phison chip/controller.
Kingston: img1 img2
Dram cache is not mandatory, Dramless SSD can use a portion of the available space for caching (that's why you should never use more than 80% of the total SSD space). But as Dram is 100x faster than SSD (some sources say 1000x), having a dedicated cache memory is a technical advantage.
 

lvt

Prominent
Apr 19, 2021
981
156
590
14
Moreover, using the SSD's own space for caching might affect the TBW as well, unless it's a hidden partition, sort of firmware managed space that doesn't count in the SSD's user available space.
 

Maxxify

Distinguished
That sequential write speed is horrible.
Well it has no SLC cache, it's writing directly to TLC. That's typical and desirable for enterprise/DC drives.

This speed is as expected giving interleaving. Looking at review samples it's using a Phison E12 (w/DRAM) and FB12808UCN1-42 flash: 128GiB packages, 8-bit flash. Notably there's power loss protection circuitry and 1GB of DRAM (D2516 = 256M16 = 512GBx2) as well - that's double the typical DRAM amount. Flash is stated to be 64L 3D TLC but specifically what, who knows, although if we're talking industrial BiCS then we would expect around 569 MB/s (Kingston's site lists 565 MB/s) given the slow tPROG on that (900µs). All this combined - strong controller, extra DRAM, high-endurance flash, plus a bit more OP - we'd expect it to have very high endurance. The benefit is, of course, that you could write at that speed forever; compare an older 480GB SM2262 drive for example. You see that once it hits steady state (outside SLC, then exceeding direct-to-TLC) it falls to 300 MB/s at best.
 

Maxxify

Distinguished
You can do better than 565 MB/s, though. I mean grab a 1TB SN750 and do 1.4 GB/s all day. But if you need PLP and high endurance I suppose the DC1000B isn't a bad choice.

To be fair, OP did not state 100% data reliability as a requirement, so no PLP is necessary. There are consumer E12-based drives that would be very similar therefore. Also, doesn't look like OP is doing enough writes for it to matter. Within that price range there are bigger (1TB) drives that'll do everything OP wants and more. OP also states a low bandwidth requirement, so...a cheap OEM enterprise drive isn't a bad idea actually.

That being said, a 500GB E16-based drive is a terrible choice; large, dynamic SLC cache with an inflated TBW, basically an entry-level Gen4 controller frankenstein'd from an E12, not nearly enough capacity to make use of it anyway.
 

adriantnt

Distinguished
Apr 4, 2012
7
0
18,510
0
The Gigabyte arrived too, I attached a test if anyone is interested.
I will have more computers configured, so will use more SSD models in parallel and see how they perform over time (performance, reliability).
Maybe besides the Kingston and this Gigabyte, I am thinking to use a Samsung PRO too. Need to look more into which one exactly.

 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS