[SOLVED] NVMe4: SSD or Mobo heatsink

Tritous

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Apr 3, 2013
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I am starting a build of a PC for the first time in a few years and it's an interesting time. It will be built around a Ryzen 3800X, 2x1TB of NVMe4, likely an RX5700X (aftermarket), and of of the impossible to choose between X570 motherboards

Usage will be a mix of gaming and some software development plus general utility. I usually overspec my build, go heavy on the (air) cooling, and try to keep everything running cool and under capacity to keep it durable and long lasting (Arrhenius' Law). I usually do a build every 4-7 years so I really want things to last

One of the big questions for me is cooling for NVMe. While i'm not chosen on a mobo, most of the mid and high end mobos have heatsinks for the NVMe that builds into the mobo armour. What isn't obvious for me is how does this fit with the NVMe which usually seems to come with heatsinks, or at least heat spreaders, built into the card. Does anyone have any advice on to resolve this clash: do we prefer the heatsink of the card (which may have better design for the card) or the heatsink of the mobo (which may fit better into a global airflow). Its also not clear to me how to fit anything other than a mobo heatsink under a large graphics card, although I'm looking at how to fit the graphics card to not be directly blowing hot air at the NVMe (or the inlet for the chipset fan for that matter!)
 
I am starting a build of a PC for the first time in a few years and it's an interesting time. It will be built around a Ryzen 3800X, 2x1TB of NVMe4, likely an RX5700X (aftermarket), and of of the impossible to choose between X570 motherboards

Usage will be a mix of gaming and some software development plus general utility. I usually overspec my build, go heavy on the (air) cooling, and try to keep everything running cool and under capacity to keep it durable and long lasting (Arrhenius' Law). I usually do a build every 4-7 years so I really want things to last

One of the big questions for me is cooling for NVMe. While i'm not chosen on a mobo, most of the mid and high end mobos have heatsinks for the NVMe that builds into the mobo armour. What isn't obvious for me is how does this fit with the NVMe which usually seems to come with heatsinks, or at least heat spreaders, built into the card. Does anyone have any advice on to resolve this clash: do we prefer the heatsink of the card (which may have better design for the card) or the heatsink of the mobo (which may fit better into a global airflow). Its also not clear to me how to fit anything other than a mobo heatsink under a large graphics card, although I'm looking at how to fit the graphics card to not be directly blowing hot air at the NVMe (or the inlet for the chipset fan for that matter!)
Built in heat sink in my Asus Prime x470 pro keeps my Samsung 960 evo cool enough. If I had an M.2 drive with own heat sink, I would use that.
 
Reactions: Tritous
I am starting a build of a PC for the first time in a few years and it's an interesting time. It will be built around a Ryzen 3800X, 2x1TB of NVMe4, likely an RX5700X (aftermarket), and of of the impossible to choose between X570 motherboards

Usage will be a mix of gaming and some software development plus general utility. I usually overspec my build, go heavy on the (air) cooling, and try to keep everything running cool and under capacity to keep it durable and long lasting (Arrhenius' Law). I usually do a build every 4-7 years so I really want things to last

One of the big questions for me is cooling for NVMe. While i'm not chosen on a mobo, most of the mid and high end mobos have heatsinks for the NVMe that builds into the mobo armour. What isn't obvious for me is how does this fit with the NVMe which usually seems to come with heatsinks, or at least heat spreaders, built into the card. Does anyone have any advice on to resolve this clash: do we prefer the heatsink of the card (which may have better design for the card) or the heatsink of the mobo (which may fit better into a global airflow). Its also not clear to me how to fit anything other than a mobo heatsink under a large graphics card, although I'm looking at how to fit the graphics card to not be directly blowing hot air at the NVMe (or the inlet for the chipset fan for that matter!)
Built in heat sink in my Asus Prime x470 pro keeps my Samsung 960 evo cool enough. If I had an M.2 drive with own heat sink, I would use that.
 
Reactions: Tritous

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