Question OC Ryzen 7 5800x SSD no longer recognized

Deodedros

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Jul 1, 2015
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So I've encountered this weird error. When I try to overclock my ryzen 7 5800x above 4.2 GHz, the SSD that windows boots to is not recognized. Has anyone ever encountered this? The second I lower the speed or reset to defaults it gets recognized with out any issue.

Here are my Specs:

Ryzen 7 5800x
Gigabyte B550M Aorus Pro-P
-Bios Vers F13
Corsair Vengenance 32GB 3200MHz
RTX 3070
EVGA 600w
Samsung 870 1TB
Transcend 128 GB
WD Blue 1TB
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What model is that 600w EVGA? Is an N1, B1 or W1?

I'd just about guarantee you are not able to supply full power to everything with one of those old crappy units.

Which model is it and how old is it, as in, how long has it been in service?

How many DIMMs (Memory modules) are installed to make up that 32GB of RAM?
 
So I've encountered this weird error. When I try to overclock my ryzen 7 5800x above 4.2 GHz, the SSD that windows boots to is not recognized. Has anyone ever encountered this? The second I lower the speed or reset to defaults it gets recognized with out any issue.

Here are my Specs:

Ryzen 7 5800x
Gigabyte B550M Aorus Pro-P
-Bios Vers F13
Corsair Vengenance 32GB 3200MHz
RTX 3070
EVGA 600w
Samsung 870 1TB
Transcend 128 GB
WD Blue 1TB
Which way are you "overclocking" , by FSB/BCLK ?
 
So I've encountered this weird error. When I try to overclock my ryzen 7 5800x above 4.2 GHz, the SSD that windows boots to is not recognized. Has anyone ever encountered this? The second I lower the speed or reset to defaults it gets recognized with out any issue.
...
Is the boot SSD an NVME? If so, it's probably attached directly to the CPU. And yes, when I was experimenting with all-core OC's on my 3700X I found it pretty easy to get to a point the CPU wouldn't recognize the boot NVME.

Although, I do think 4.2Ghz is a bit low for a simple multiplier overclock, but using bus clock to overclock it can be very easy.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Why would anybody overclock using FSB/BCLK on Ryzen CPUs that have unlocked multipliers? If somebody IS doing that, they need to not be overclocking anymore until they understand what they are doing well enough to not make that kind of foolish mistake.
 
Why would anybody overclock using FSB/BCLK on Ryzen CPUs that have unlocked multipliers? If somebody IS doing that, they need to not be overclocking anymore until they understand what they are doing well enough to not make that kind of foolish mistake.
Indeed. But as you are well aware, there's a lot of misinformation out there. Add to that the fact that toothpicks have instructions on them.

And when I bought a goldfish bowl for my little brother, there was a note on the box that read "NB, does not include fish".

So it really isn't inconceivable that someone believed the first misinformed person who 'helped' them :LOL:
 

Deodedros

Distinguished
Jul 1, 2015
39
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18,530
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What model is that 600w EVGA? Is an N1, B1 or W1?

I'd just about guarantee you are not able to supply full power to everything with one of those old crappy units.

Which model is it and how old is it, as in, how long has it been in service?

How many DIMMs (Memory modules) are installed to make up that 32GB of RAM?
I'm not too sure on the specific module, I'll have to get back to you on that and double check. I think I bought it in like 2017 or 2018?

I've got 2x16
 
At first I was changing the BCLK but immediately ran into issues so I reset the defaults and only starting make changes to the multiplier
That's why I asked, FSB/BCLK also change RAM, PCIe and SATA and they are sensitive to even small changes. Unless you have option to keep them at defaults they will cause stability problems.
N
Besides, 4.2 is no overclock, 4.8/4.9+ would be-
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I'm not too sure on the specific module, I'll have to get back to you on that and double check. I think I bought it in like 2017 or 2018?

I've got 2x16
If you bought the memory in 2016, and clearly the board and CPU are much newer, then (And this possibility exists even if you bought the memory at the same time) it's very possible that the memory is not compatible with your motherboard model. And by "compatible" I don't mean "not the right type". I mean, doesn't play nice with that board, or, doesn't play AT ALL with that board. This is why there is a motherboard QVL list and why G.Skill, Corsair, Crucial and Kingston all have their own compatibility lists or memory qualifying utilities on their websites. So it might simply be that the memory you have is not compatible with your motherboard, even though it is the right "type" of memory. Not being on the QVL or validation list doesn't automatically mean it can't work on any given board, especially if you're willing to do a lot of work with fiddling with primary, secondary and tertiary memory timings, not to mention voltage and frequency/speed, but it does potentially increase the probability that they are not going to play nice together.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 

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