News Odroid N2L Takes Aim at Raspberry Pi 4

domih

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"Odroid N2L Takes Aim at Raspberry Pi 4" ?

No it does not. Hardkernel could not care less about Raspberry, they made the Odroid N2L for their B2B customers.
 
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eye4bear

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Even when you add in the additional WiFI/Bluetooth, it is half the price; as well as much faster than any Raspberry Pi4 you can currently buy.
 
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WebBeachBoy

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FWIW, I've been pleased with my N2+ that I got about 1.5 years ago. That said, 4 GB of RAM is a little tight and I'm eager to see if ODROID will offer a RK3588 board, or similar.
Hi, Are you still happy with this ?
What OS are you using with it ? I'd like to run LXLE on an N2+ as I like the functionality of the OS
 

bit_user

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Hi, Are you still happy with this ? What OS are you using with it ?
Yes, but I don't have occasion to use it very often. For me, the main downside has been the lack of proper 3D acceleration in the vendor-supported Ubuntu image. If I really cared about it, I'd probly try installing Armbian. What a lot of people seem to do is just install a custom kernel.

Another popular distro, which focuses on things like 3D and video acceleration, seems to be CoreElec. I can't say how useful it would be for general usage, however.

I'd like to run LXLE on an N2+ as I like the functionality of the OS
Sorry, but I don't know anything about it. You'll have to research it yourself, if you're sufficiently interested. Here's the forum for running other OS's on it (i.e. besides Android and Ubuntu):



Depending on what you want it for, you should really consider a RK3588S board. I don't know of any that are particularly well-supported, but I know Orange Pi 5 is pretty cheap and has Armbian support. Although it's somewhat more expensive than the N2+, you can get it with 8 GB of RAM (or more?) and it's about twice as fast. However, it still has a Mali GPU, so proprietary drivers will still be needed for 3D and video acceleration.
 
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WebBeachBoy

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Yes, but I don't have occasion to use it very often. For me, the main downside has been the lack of proper 3D acceleration in the vendor-supported Ubuntu image. If I really cared about it, I'd probly try installing Armbian. What a lot of people seem to do is just install a custom kernel.

Another popular distro, which focuses on things like 3D and video acceleration, seems to be CoreElec. I can't say how useful it would be for general usage, however.


Sorry, but I don't know anything about it. You'll have to research it yourself, if you're sufficiently interested. Here's the forum for running other OS's on it (i.e. besides Android and Ubuntu):



Depending on what you want it for, you should really consider a RK3588S board. I don't know of any that are particularly well-supported, but I know Orange Pi 5 is pretty cheap and has Armbian support. Although it's somewhat more expensive than the N2+, you can get it with 8 GB of RAM (or more?) and it's about twice as fast. However, it still has a Mali GPU, so proprietary drivers will still be needed for 3D and video acceleration.
Thanks for all the info. I will check out the forum you mention.
We wouldn't need to have heavy graphics support. The machine would just be used to run millions of data enquiries online 24 hours per day - so could run happily by itself.
Yes 4GB Ram is not much even for simple tasks. I would prefer 8GB but cost is also a facto of course. We looked at getting ex lease Dell Optiplex machines to use but we don't have the space for all of them. We want a 'bank' of small units that can be housed on a shelf with a hardware software KVM switch.
 

bit_user

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The machine would just be used to run millions of data enquiries online 24 hours per day - so could run happily by itself.
I guess you've ruled out using a cloud service? That would be best, because new instances can spin up to meet demand, and they also use reliable server-grade hardware with various data protection features.

In any case, good luck!
 

WebBeachBoy

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I guess you've ruled out using a cloud service? That would be best, because new instances can spin up to meet demand, and they also use reliable server-grade hardware with various data protection features.

In any case, good luck!
Thanks :)
No we don't want to use a cloud service as the data is very sensitive.....
 

bit_user

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Thanks :)
No we don't want to use a cloud service as the data is very sensitive.....
Fair enough.

If possible, I'd use PCs with ECC memory, at least. For a filesystem, I'd use something like ZFS or BTRFS that has checksums. BTRFS has been in Linux for more than a decade, while some might still consider OpenZFS to be fairly experimental.

All of this depends a lot on how much you care about data integrity. If not, then something like these Amlogic or RK3588-based boards would be fine. Even if you use those, you can still use BTRFS for at least the volume(s) holding your data.
 

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