Question Old laptop with legacy BIOS: controller IDE to AHCI?

Sep 13, 2019
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Hi all,
I would like to upgrade an old laptop Compaq Presario CQ60 with a new SSD (replacing the hdd).
I know the controller AHCI will be better than an IDE.
The problem is my laptop has got a legacy BIOS (not UEFI) so I can't swith from IDE to AHCI via BIOS (I'm aware of a way to change the IDE to AHCI via the Windows registry and the BIOS but, as stated, I have a legacy BIOS so I can't change this SATA setting).

Anybody knows how to change an IDE to AHCI with a legacy BIOS?

I'm trying to change the controller IDE to AHCI in a Compaq Presario CQ60 with Windows 10. The SSD in question is a Kingston V300 Now (SATA III).

I'm happy to change the controller with a new fresh Windows 10 installation or also with the OS already installed, either is fine for me.

Thank you :)
 
CQ60 came in both AMD and Intel powered variants, so we can have no idea what you have. The Intel ones in particular may well have been equipped with ICH7 which does not support AHCI at all.

AHCI came out in 2004, some 7 years before UEFI became common, so not sure why you would think that could be a requirement.

While SSDs are faster with AHCI enabled, TRIM works fine without it.
 
Sep 13, 2019
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Thank you for your answer.
The processor in question is an AMD Mobile Sempron SI-42


The only way I know to change the controller IDE to AHCI is via a UEFI BIOS:

  1. Right-click the Windows Start Menu. Choose Command Prompt (Admin).
    1. If you don’t see Command Prompt listed, it’s because you have already been updated to a later version of Windows. If so, use this method instead to get to the Command Prompt:
      1. Click the Start Button and type cmd
      2. Right-click the result and select Run as administrator
  2. Type this command and press ENTER: bcdedit /set {current} safeboot minimal
    1. If this command does not work for you, try bcdedit /set safeboot minimal
  3. Restart the computer and enter BIOS Setup (the key to press varies between systems).
  4. Change the SATA Operation mode to AHCI from either IDE or RAID (again, the language varies).
  5. Save changes and exit Setup and Windows will automatically boot to Safe Mode.
  6. Right-click the Windows Start Menu once more. Choose Command Prompt (Admin).
  7. Type this command and press ENTER: bcdedit /deletevalue {current} safeboot
    1. If you had to try the alternate command above, you will likely need to do so here also: bcdedit /deletevalue safeboot
  8. Reboot once more and Windows will automatically start with AHCI drivers enabled.
At the point 3 and 4 of this procedure I need the setting to be changed in the BIOS and a legacy BIOS doesn't permit it, I know it is possible to change this setting (IDE to AHCI) ina UEFI BIOS.

So I hope there is another way to switch from IDE to AHCI without the requirement of the BIOS setting.

Thanks again
 
At the point 3 and 4 of this procedure I need the setting to be changed in the BIOS and a legacy BIOS doesn't permit it
Not true.
If there is sata controller AHCI option in BIOS, then there's no reason, why BIOS would not allow changing the setting.

Edit: May be only if bios options are locked from modification by admin password. Then yes - you can not change it without the password.
 
Not true.
If there is sata controller AHCI option in BIOS, then there's no reason, why BIOS would not allow changing the setting.

Edit: May be only if bios options are locked from modification by admin password. Then yes - you can not change it without the password.
Since it is a prebuilt machines bios, there are always a lot of options that the user cannot get to. I have always hatted working on prebuilt machines bios' for that reason.
 
Sep 13, 2019
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Unfortunately in my BIOS I don't have a option related to the SATA controller AHCI.
I suppose at this point I can't change the controller IDE :(
 
Mar 16, 2019
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I have (3) AMD 10 year old Gigabyte 785G boards (2 US2H and 1 UD3H) and all have the choice of (Native) IDE or AHCI for SATA HDD settings. Have you looked for the option of setting a Supervisor password?

I guess you've already checked to see if HP issued a BIOS update to enable compatibility with that SSD?
 
Last edited:
Go ahead and install a ssd in whatever mode you can.

It will be some 4x faster in sequential and 40x faster in random I/O.
It will absolutely transform the performance of your laptop.
The value of trim is both a performance benefit in writing and longer ssd endurance from reduced writing.
Endurance used to be an issue with the original 40gb ssd devices.
But, with today's devices in the 200gb and higher capacity, endurance is no longer an issue.
 

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