Question Old stock Antec fan

Dec 7, 2021
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I'm trying to add 2 fans in 1 header using a splitter, the Cool master fan is 16 amp but the Antec says nothing but it's brand name and logos around it. Is it safe to go with it or should I replace it? Both of the fan were reused from my old cases from when I was in elementary, now I'm in college
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Can you parse images to the fans you're working with? It'd help us two fold if you could mention where you spruced the fans from. That would give us some indication of what their specs could be after locating their origins. As for the motherboard you want to tether the fans to, mind sharing the make and model of said motherboard? Why not have the fans run off the PSU or a fan controller? Another suggestion is to just use concurrent spec'd fans with PWM functionality and a PWM fan splitter to tidy things up.
 
Dec 7, 2021
8
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10
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Can you parse images to the fans you're working with? It'd help us two fold if you could mention where you spruced the fans from. That would give us some indication of what their specs could be after locating their origins. As for the motherboard you want to tether the fans to, mind sharing the make and model of said motherboard? Why not have the fans run off the PSU or a fan controller? Another suggestion is to just use concurrent spec'd fans with PWM functionality and a PWM fan splitter to tidy things up.
The fan was a back exhaust fan when taken out, the motherboard is a ASRock b450m ac, I did used it with the psu but it gets too loud when recording a video
 
Dec 7, 2021
8
0
10
0
Can you parse images to the fans you're working with? It'd help us two fold if you could mention where you spruced the fans from. That would give us some indication of what their specs could be after locating their origins. As for the motherboard you want to tether the fans to, mind sharing the make and model of said motherboard? Why not have the fans run off the PSU or a fan controller? Another suggestion is to just use concurrent spec'd fans with PWM functionality and a PWM fan splitter to tidy things up.
This is how it looks like with no numbers in the back, mine is similar to it https://www.ebay.com/itm/274925750778?hash=item4002da09fa:g:qIcAAOSwJsdhK-Ba
 

Paperdoc

Polypheme
Ambassador
First point: that Antec fan is a 3-pin design, so the ONLY way to control its speed is for the mobo header to use the older Voltage Control Mode. Your mobo has ONE of its CHA_FAN headers as 3-pin (the one near front bottom edge) so it MAY do that type of fan control. (SOME mobos have a 3-pin header with NO speed control capability.) You have not told us exactly which CoolerMaster fan you have. Look closely at its female connector on the end of its wires. If it has THREE wires and holes, it is the same older type, and you CAN connect both of them to a single mobo header with a simple Splitter so that both have their speeds controlled. BUT if the CoolerMaster unit has FOUR wires and holes, it is a 4-pin PWM style that requires a different type on control signals. For that, you should connect it to the only 4-pin mobo CHA_FAN header near rear mid-board. The manual says that
header will automatically detect the fan type connected and control it properly.

If the Antec 3-pin fan IS speed controlled by the CHA_FAN2 3-pin header, then leave it there. If not - if it always runs full speed - post back here for a different arrangement.
 
Dec 7, 2021
8
0
10
0
First point: that Antec fan is a 3-pin design, so the ONLY way to control its speed is for the mobo header to use the older Voltage Control Mode. Your mobo has ONE of its CHA_FAN headers as 3-pin (the one near front bottom edge) so it MAY do that type of fan control. (SOME mobos have a 3-pin header with NO speed control capability.) You have not told us exactly which CoolerMaster fan you have. Look closely at its female connector on the end of its wires. If it has THREE wires and holes, it is the same older type, and you CAN connect both of them to a single mobo header with a simple Splitter so that both have their speeds controlled. BUT if the CoolerMaster unit has FOUR wires and holes, it is a 4-pin PWM style that requires a different type on control signals. For that, you should connect it to the only 4-pin mobo CHA_FAN header near rear mid-board. The manual says that
header will automatically detect the fan type connected and control it properly.

If the Antec 3-pin fan IS speed controlled by the CHA_FAN2 3-pin header, then leave it there. If not - if it always runs full speed - post back here for a different arrangement.
The Antec doesn't go at full speed when connected to the motherboard but it's not detected for speeds in bios, the Cool master is also a 3 pin yes
 
Dec 7, 2021
8
0
10
0
First point: that Antec fan is a 3-pin design, so the ONLY way to control its speed is for the mobo header to use the older Voltage Control Mode. Your mobo has ONE of its CHA_FAN headers as 3-pin (the one near front bottom edge) so it MAY do that type of fan control. (SOME mobos have a 3-pin header with NO speed control capability.) You have not told us exactly which CoolerMaster fan you have. Look closely at its female connector on the end of its wires. If it has THREE wires and holes, it is the same older type, and you CAN connect both of them to a single mobo header with a simple Splitter so that both have their speeds controlled. BUT if the CoolerMaster unit has FOUR wires and holes, it is a 4-pin PWM style that requires a different type on control signals. For that, you should connect it to the only 4-pin mobo CHA_FAN header near rear mid-board. The manual says that
header will automatically detect the fan type connected and control it properly.

If the Antec 3-pin fan IS speed controlled by the CHA_FAN2 3-pin header, then leave it there. If not - if it always runs full speed - post back here for a different arrangement.
So I plan to make it easier since it's on sale, you think I should just go with these fans since that only take 0.3 A instead? To fill in the top exuast with 3 using the 3 pin header on the mobo? CORSAIR iCUE SP120 RGB PRO 120mm System Cabinet Fan Kit with RGB Lighting Black/White CO-9050094-WW - Best Buy
 

Paperdoc

Polypheme
Ambassador
If you go for the Corsair SP120 3-pack kit on sale and do NOT use your two old fans, there will be a few differences you need to watch for. But they WILL work well.

  1. These fans are 3-pin style, and the kit include Corsair's latest controller box, the Lighting Node Pro. The fans include lights of the ARGB type, and the Node Pro unit powers and controls those. It is NOT clear to me whether that unit also powers and controls the fan MOTORS, or whether the fans each have a second separate cable for the motor. To use the Lighting Node Pro, you download and use the free Corsair utility iCUE. The Node Pro requires two connections (other than the fans) - one connection to a PSU SATA power output for power, and another to an unused mobo USB 2 header so iCUE can communicate with the Node Pro. Then all lighting is controlled by iCUE, and you do not need any mobo lighting header.
  2. IF the fans have separate fan motor cables, they will need to be connected to a mobo fan header using a simple Splitter, and NOT a HUB because they are 3-pin. A SPLITTER has one cable ending in a female connector with (typically) 4 holes that plugs into a mobo header. That header can be either 3-pin or 4-pin. Then it has two or more (you need at least three) male outputs to plug in fans. It has NO other connectors. A HUB, on the other hand, has those PLUS a third cable type that must plug into a power outputs from the PSU. This device can control the speed of ONLY 4-pin PWM fans, so you do NOT want that. An example of a Splitter (actually, a 2-pack) that looks like a collection of cable "arms"
  3. https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-2-Pack-Way-Splitter/dp/B07PXLHNZ6/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=fan+splitter&qid=1638983414&sr=8-4
  4. Whether or not the fans have separate motor cables that connect via Splitter to a mobo CHA_FAN header, iCUE will probably be the way you control their speeds. It can work by taking over control of the mobo headers you use.
  5. Where to connect those fans IF they have those separate cables? Any header that does work in the older 3-pin fan's Voltage Control Mode. Your single 3-pin header (CHA_FAN2) may be the ideal place - such a header can only use that control Mode. But from the mobo manual it is not clear whether that header actually does speed control. IF you already have a 3-pin fan connected ther3 and it DOES change that fan;s speed as your workload changes, then that is the one to use. If that does not work, then your other choice is the 4-pin header CHA_FAN1. The manual says it will automatically detect the type of fan connected there and set itself to the correct Mode. That will work IF you use only 3-pin fans on the Splitter, AMD ensure that one fan IS plugged into the only Splitter output with all 4 of its pins. (You CAN plug a 3-pin fan into a 4-pin output - it just will not use Pin #4.)
 
Last edited:
Dec 7, 2021
8
0
10
0
If you go for the Corsair SP120 3-pack kit on sale and do NOT use your two old fans, there will be a few differences you need to watch for. But they WILL work well.

  1. These fans are 3-pin style, and the kit include Corsair's latest controller box, the Lighting Node Pro. The fans include lights of the ARGB type, and the Node Pro unit powers and controls those. It is NOT clear to me whether that unit also powers and controls the fan MOTORS, or whether the fans each have a second separate cable for the motor. To use the Lighting Node Pro, you download and use the free Corsair utility iCUE. The Node Pro requires two connections (other than the fans) - one connection to a PSU SATA power output for power, and another to an unused mobo USB 2 header so iCUE can communicate with the Node Pro. Then all lighting is controlled by iCUE, and you do not need any mobo lighting header.
  2. IF the fans have separate fan motor cables, they will need to be connected to a mobo fan header using a simple Splitter, and NOT a HUB because they are 3-pin. A SPLITTER has one cable ending in a female connector with (typically) 4 holes that plugs into a mobo header. That header can be either 3-pin or 4-pin. Then it has two or more (you need at least three) male outputs to plug in fans. It has NO other connectors. A HUB, on the other hand, has those PLUS a third cable type that must plug into a power outputs from the PSU. This device can control the speed of ONLY 4-pin PWM fans, so you do NOT want that. An example of a Splitter (actually, a 2-pack) that looks like a collection of cable "arms"
  3. https://www.amazon.com/Cable-Matters-2-Pack-Way-Splitter/dp/B07PXLHNZ6/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=fan+splitter&qid=1638983414&sr=8-4
  4. Whether or not the fans have separate motor cables that connect via Splitter to a mobo CHA_FAN header, iCUE will probably be the way you control their speeds. It can work by taking over control of the mobo headers you use.
  5. Where to connect those fans IF they have those separate cables? Any header that does work in the older 3-pin fan's Voltage Control Mode. Your single 3-pin header (CHA_FAN2) may be the ideal place - such a header can only use that control Mode. But from the mobo manual it is not clear whether that header actually does speed control. IF you already have a 3-pin fan connected ther3 and it DOES change that fan;s speed as your workload changes, then that is the one to use. If that does not work, then your other choice is the 4-pin header CHA_FAN1. The manual says it will automatically detect the type of fan connected there and set itself to the correct Mode. That will work IF you use only 3-pin fans on the Splitter, AMD ensure that one fan IS plugged into the only Splitter output with all 4 of its pins. (You CAN plug a 3-pin fan into a 4-pin output - it just will not use Pin #4.)
Can I use a splitter connected to another splitter to have 3 slots for the 3 fan for 1 header?
 

Paperdoc

Polypheme
Ambassador
Yes, you can "stack" splitters (plug the input of one into an output from another. The limit is the maximum AMPS that can be supplied by the mobo header that "stack" is plugged into. Most often that is 1.0 A. You note that the specs for those Corsair SP120 fans say max 0.3 A per fan, or 0.9 A total for the trio. You can NOT add another fan to that without exceeding the limit of one header. You would have to power the second group from the other header. How many fans) not including the CPU cooler) do you plan?
 
Reactions: Arisu
Dec 7, 2021
8
0
10
0
Yes, you can "stack" splitters (plug the input of one into an output from another. The limit is the maximum AMPS that can be supplied by the mobo header that "stack" is plugged into. Most often that is 1.0 A. You note that the specs for those Corsair SP120 fans say max 0.3 A per fan, or 0.9 A total for the trio. You can NOT add another fan to that without exceeding the limit of one header. You would have to power the second group from the other header. How many fans) not including the CPU cooler) do you plan?
I decided to use the commander core xt for the fans instead, but idk if I can control the speeds, but other than that problems are solved. Thanks to you and everyone else that help
 

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