Question omputer starts up, shuts down after 1-2 second, then boots up fine?

Jan 5, 2020
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Specs:

Intel core i9-9900k
ASUS Rog Strix GeForce RTX 2080Ti OC Edition
ASUS ROG STRIX Z390-F GAMING
Corsair 32GB DDR4 RAM @3600Mhz
2x 1TB Kingston mvme m.2 ssd
NZXT Kraken x72, 360mm Radiator.
Corsair RM850x PSU

Im not sure, but i think the problem came after i overclocked my cpu. The pc also works completly fine when it boots up. the only thing i find wierd is that it turns of before booting. exactly the same way a pc often start when u boot up for the first time after building it.

Is this normal, or does it damage the computer? is it something i just could ignore?
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
You will see this with pretty much a lot of the boards that need to have their power delivery to get charged up prior to a bootup/overclocked setting. You forgot to mention the make and model of your PSU.

You might want to also check and see that you're on the latest BIOS update for your motherboard. Edit - I see it now after you edited it in.

850W from that Corsair is plenty for the entire system. Keep an eye if the system shuts down abruptly when taxed.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
You will see this with pretty much a lot of the boards that need to have their power delivery to get charged up prior to a bootup/overclocked setting.
Nope, the PSU won't be signaling PW_GOOD line until all output rails are within tolerances and this won't happen until power delivery is "charged up" so that ain't a valid reason. Also, PCs boot-loop like this, the PSU turns off between attempts, no "charging the power delivery" happening there either.

Since the problem appeared after OP tried to OC, first thing to try would be a CMOS clear and see if the issue persists.

What the boot-looping does do though is get components to warm up a bit and the thermal expansion might be just enough to get a bad solder joint or other microscopic defect to come together and allow the PC to boot. Could also be cold components passing more current than warm ones, so the cold boot trips an over-current limit somewhere and triggers a restart which is then successful thanks to the problematic component(s) being ever so slightly warmer.
 

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