On Electron At A Time: Scientists Close In On Quantum Computing

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cah027

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Actually I find that it barely entertaining its so infantile. Why. I have two Quantum Computers built by me in my lab down in the basement of my home. Yes.... you see... I finally had to tell someone !!!! Moooaahahahaaaaa (evil laugh) ......
 

Evolution2001

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[citation][nom]Torment[/nom]They can't actually be in both observable states at once. That's not how QM works.[/citation]Might have something to do with quantum entanglement, as such that knowing the state of one bit, you can 'observe' the known state of the other.

...or not...
 

V3NOM

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[citation][nom]Evolution2001[/nom]Might have something to do with quantum entanglement, as such that knowing the state of one bit, you can 'observe' the known state of the other....or not...[/citation]
um yes...mhm... anyone here speak english?
 
G

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In QM everything is a probability, so until the spin of the electron is measured it has equal, 50-50 probability of being in both spin states. But I agree it should have said the electron has an equal chance of having either spin and not "A quantum bit, or qubit, can be both at the same time."
 
G

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in short, you can never be 100% sure in quantum mechanics. refer to the uncertaintny principle.

Nature itself doesnt know for sure.

Looking at an electron changes its behavior. Refer to the double slit experiment.

In quantum mechanics, an electron or any particle can be in multiple places at the same time and can even to some extent move backwards in time to change its current state. Also multiple places at the same time doesnt mean the same info is stored on it. Thus yes they could be observable in both states, however, following the quantum uncertainty principle. we can never be sure.

Its fun stuff. Not too hard, just needs worded simple.

And about entanglement... well once two particles are entangled and share their quantum state, both show opposite behaviors. Eg, one rotates clockwise, the other will rotate counterclockwise. That said. If the entangled particles form a system, then yes you have one example of both states at once. Until you look at it.. xD
 
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