Question One stick from a new kit of 4 won't work

Jan 14, 2020
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I have bought a brand new 64GB kit (4x16) G.Skill Ripjaws V DDR4 3200MHz F4-3200C16Q-64GVK.
Config that I use is: ASUS Prime X370 Pro with Ryzen 1700X


As my CPU and old RAM (Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000 16GB (2x8)) were overclocked I reset BIOS to defaults, even updated BIOS later, but the problem is still the same.


By trying different combinations of stick one at the time, 2 at the time 3 and 4 at the time even putting them in different sockets I came to the conclusion that one stick is not working.

When I plug fault stick alone in any socket I get the "Black Screen" and MB beeps "No memory installed".
When I plug fault stick with 1,2 or 3 other memory sticks I get an only black screen and no sound.

When I plug don't use that fault stick and plug 1,2 or 3 stick alone or together everything works fine.
I have tried to OC with automatic XMP to 3200 MHz 3 sticks together - that didn't work :), but I think that could definitely OC it manually.

I need to mention that BIOS is on default and no XMP or any other RAM or CPU OC is applied.

Before I ordered RAM I checked compatibility on official MB and RAM manufacturers and also on different forums. I came to the conclusion that it will definitely work with my MB and CPU. I even asked if the seller can get me Ripjaws V DDR4 3200MHz 128GB (4x32) kit because I saw a post confirms that it works with ASUS Prime X370 Pro and Ryzen 7 1700X.

Now I'm having a hard time convincing a seller that problem is with RAM not with my MB or BIOS version.
This is not the first time I upgraded my PC, I have experience as a builder so I didn't damage the RAM by not installing it correctly.
The seller told me that he will try a memory kit on his MB X570 and B450 before he contacts his supplier and demands a new kit.

Does something similar happen to someone? Any advice on what to do?
 
Let's put it this way. The FIRST thing I suspect when I get a system that's not behaving properly (BSODs, crashes, hangs, etc) is the RAM. The second thing is the PSU. After that, unless user error is involved, most other components are an order of magnitude less likely to be faulty.
 
Jan 14, 2020
4
0
10
0
Let's put it this way. The FIRST thing I suspect when I get a system that's not behaving properly (BSODs, crashes, hangs, etc) is the RAM. The second thing is the PSU. After that, unless user error is involved, most other components are an order of magnitude less likely to be faulty.
I put back by old ram and everything is good as it was.
With 3 new stick everything is working fine, too.
Just that one is no good.
 

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