Question One unexpected shutdown after new PSU install but fine after that ?

Ucchi

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Apr 4, 2019
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After I was finished installing my PSU I turned the PC on and let it run for a few minutes. Everything seemed normal, but after a few minutes it just shut down. I didn't have it connected to a monitor sadly so I'm pretty in the dark at what the issue could have been, but looking at event viewer it was unexpected (41 and 6008). The only out of the ordinary thing I did was boot by jumping the mobo and disconnecting one fan because I need a new molex to 3-pin. I've done CPU and GPU stress tests as well as played games and my PSU seems to be holding up, but I'm still worried.

Another odd thing is my mobo was only registering one stick of RAM. Stupidly I only noticed a bit ago so I'm not sure if it is related to the shutdown, but after reinstalling both RAM sticks they work fine now. I did have an XMP on in the bios before changing my PSU, but it was off afterwards which I thought was a bit strange. I wasn't messing with overclocking or anything, I just turned it on, but then found out it doesn't even need to be on to go to the 2666mhz limit of my MB, so now it's off. I'm going to run memtest later to see if I get any errors.

I have no clue what could be going on, but I'm pretty paranoid and stressed because of that random shutdown. I don't want to RMA the PSU since honestly I'm leaning towards the shutdown being me messing up the jumping process (if that's even possible) or something stupid and stress tests seem fine. Any help is appreciated, I'll post my specs below.

Motherboard: MSI H310M PRO-VDH (MS-7B29)
CPU: Intel Core i5-9400F
GPU: Zotac RTX 3060 Ti LHR
PSU: Corsair RM Series RM750 Fully Modular Ultra-Low Noise ATX
RAM: Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 32GB (2 x 16GB) 288-Pin PC RAM DDR4 3200 (PC4 25600) Desktop Memory Model TLZGD432G3200HC16FDC01
HDD: Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500 GB
 

Ralston18

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Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer.

Either one or both may have captured some error code, warning, or even an informational event when the PC shutdown.

Start with Reliability History: the time line format is very likely to show what happened.
 

Ucchi

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Apr 4, 2019
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Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer.

Either one or both may have captured some error code, warning, or even an informational event when the PC shutdown.

Start with Reliability History: the time line format is very likely to show what happened.
This is the only thing that comes up, it doesn't seem like it was a BSOD or anything.

When I booted up my PC just now it was pretty slow too, so I ran sfc and it repaired some corruption. I'm not sure if that's related to anything but maybe it's because of the RAM issue? Either way what do you think is going on? Should I be worried about my PSU? I'm pretty lost.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Unexpected shutdowns can and do corrupt files.

A normal shutdown via the Windows Power icon allows Windows to do some "housecleaning" and otherwise get prepared for the next boot.

Whatever the original cause (could have been some sort of one-time fluke) my thought is that files were corrupted.

Running "sfc /scannow" and/or "dism" identified and fixed the corrupted files as the tools are designed and expected to do.

I would not worry about the PSU.

Simply continue to monitor Reliability History and Event Viewer. Start with Reliability History. Very likely that there may always be a few red and yellow icons indicating some problem.

If so you can investigate further as necessary.

Event Viewer is not as user friendly and takes more time and effort.,

FYI from this Forum:

http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-3128616/windows-event-viewer.html

Watch for any trends that show varying types of errors and increasing numbers of errors. That is a pattern can indicate a PSU problem.

However, the problem, may actually be power: something as simple as loose cable....

Most important is that you continuously ensure that all important data is backed up at least 2 x to other locations away from the host computer. Verify that the backups are both recoverable and readable.

Some problems may not provide any warnings.....
 

Ucchi

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Apr 4, 2019
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Like you said I'm pointing towards some other issue besides PSU, but it's hard not to be worried when something like that happens after a PSU change. I'll try my best not to worry about it, since I don't want to deal with RMAing. Plus that power supply is rated pretty high if I'm right, so I doubt I'll have to worry about something exploding (I hope).

I'll keep an eye on things and be thankful everything seems fine now.
 
Like you said I'm pointing towards some other issue besides PSU, but it's hard not to be worried when something like that happens after a PSU change. I'll try my best not to worry about it, since I don't want to deal with RMAing. Plus that power supply is rated pretty high if I'm right, so I doubt I'll have to worry about something exploding (I hope).

I'll keep an eye on things and be thankful everything seems fine now.
Did you reuse any cables from old PSU?
 

Ucchi

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Apr 4, 2019
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Did you reuse any cables from old PSU?
Nope, my old one wasn't modular.
Ran memtest for 8 passes and the RAM seems fine, haven't had any anomalies out of the PC either. Since one stick was just not working out of nowhere I have to imagine I did SOMETHING wrong which caused a crash related to RAM, just annoying that it was a shutdown with no log files or anything.
 
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