[SOLVED] Overclocking i7 3770k

toniplavna

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Dec 4, 2016
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Hello,
I read a lot of threads these days about OC of this processor. My rig now is i7 3770k, gigabyte z77mx-d3h and 1600mhz ddr3 huper fury.

Yesterday I was playing a bit in BIOS and done some test in cpu-z bench and geekbench.

I was changing only multiplier, that main one not the turbos. I left turbo on. I set x40 so I got 4000mhz at peak, also left everything on default and auto. I know its no the best way but I just wanted to see if there is improvement. And there is ofc, better score in the tests.

Problem is that I have trash stock cooler so I don't know should I go to x42 and stay at 4200 till I get better cooler or to stay at x40? Temps are fine, not that much difference since turbo is x39.

I didn't stress tested much cuz Im not a big fan of that cuz sometimes they are unrealistic. Like intel burn test , stressing just too much, like its some heatsink melting tester lol. In the reality I want that my pc be stable for playing games, rendering in premiere pro and adobe after effect. And pass cpu benchmarks. Thats all.

Also, if I let my voltage on auto, will the motherboard give more voltage than cpu needs in some situations? Thats what I heard. If I set to manual, will it still drop down sometimes on idle to save power if I let c1 etc enabled? Problem is also if I set manual , then I will probably need to stress test to see if that voltage is enough, but letting it on auto I guess it will give cpu enough power on this low OC that Im trying to achieve.

Any other tips for this cpu and motherboard? What about FSB should I let it stay at 100mhz and change only multiplier for my 4.0-4.2 oc?
 
Your next step is to play with the "CPU/vCore voltage offset" and lower it until the system is unstable to find the minimum voltage your CPU can take at that frequency. "Undervolting" is a loose term for this. More like manual voltage adjustment.

Generally speaking, your CPU consumes the same amount of power at the same voltage no matter what frequency that is (Volts * Amps = Watts). Therefore, lowering your voltage from Auto, may allow you to achieve higher frequencies at the same amount of power draw as your current 4.0GH/Auto.

Generally you don't stress test with AVX enabled. If you have the latest version of Prime95, you'll see the option to disable AVX at the bottom of the stress test window.
 
Aug 12, 2019
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i would really suggest getting an aftermarket cooler.... and aida 64 is not a cpu killer but it shows good results when it comes to thermal throttling... speaking of which... while running a stress test whats your cpu temperature on that xxxxxx cooler?

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Your next step is to play with the "CPU/vCore voltage offset" and lower it until the system is unstable to find the minimum voltage your CPU can take at that frequency. "Undervolting" is a loose term for this. More like manual voltage adjustment.

Generally speaking, your CPU consumes the same amount of power at the same voltage no matter what frequency that is (Volts * Amps = Watts). Therefore, lowering your voltage from Auto, may allow you to achieve higher frequencies at the same amount of power draw as your current 4.0GH/Auto.

Generally you don't stress test with AVX enabled. If you have the latest version of Prime95, you'll see the option to disable AVX at the bottom of the stress test window.
 

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