[SOLVED] Overclocking without the right amound of voltage core.

Jul 21, 2019
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So lets say you add 1.2V of voltage core and it survives like 2 hours of stress test but after 4H it crashes. you would call it unstable right and should add more volt. (As far as i know)

But what are the downside of a so called unstable system since it does help with cooling and i dont think it harms the cpu if you only use the pc for like 1/2 hours a day max.

So to summarize does giving not sufficient Voltage core damage the cpu even if you dont experience (In your effective usage time) blue screens (But lets say 2/3 hours later the effective usage time) it does give blue screen

(But in theory you dont experience the blue screen because you only max max use it for 2 hours the span it doesnt give a blue screen)
 

CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
When posting questions of this nature, always provide complete system specs.

Although the CPU will survive, every Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD) has the potential to corrupt software, as it all to often does, so it's absolutely critical to have at least 2 total system backups at all times. Not just for stability testing, but at all times.

This means when a blue screen crashes Windows, it can corrupt the Operating System (OS) so it won't boot, where even a repair operation will fail to make it boot. Blue screen crashes can also corrupt any software you were running at that time, as well as dozens of other installed softwares that are always running in the background. This includes not just software running from drive "C", but potentially other drives as well.

Knowingly allowing your rig to routinely run with recurring BSODs amounts to digital Russian Roulette. I strongly urge you to immediately back up your system, then get it running stable. If you're concerned about cooling, then configure your overclock to accommodate proper Core temperatures.

CT :sol:
 
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ConanLock

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The crash might've been due to inadequate cooling, incorrect voltage or just overclocking too far. For any one of these, even if it never crashes for you, is bad for the CPU, as it won't be running correctly. One day, the CPU might simply fail, and you will be left with the hard job of finding what went wrong, and then have to pay for a replacement.
 
Jul 21, 2019
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The crash might've been due to inadequate cooling, incorrect voltage or just overclocking too far. For any one of these, even if it never crashes for you, is bad for the CPU, as it won't be running correctly. One day, the CPU might simply fail, and you will be left with the hard job of finding what went wrong, and then have to pay for a replacement.
When posting questions of this nature, always provide complete system specs.

Although the CPU will survive, every Blue Screen Of Death (BSOD) has the potential to corrupt software, as it all to often does, so it's absolutely critical to have at least 2 total system backups at all times. Not just for stability testing, but at all times.

This means when a blue screen crashes Windows, it can corrupt the Operating System (OS) so it won't boot, where even a repair operation will fail to make it boot. Blue screen crashes can also corrupt any software you were running at that time, as well as dozens of other installed softwares that are always running in the background. This includes not just software running from drive "C", but potentially other drives as well.

Knowingly allowing your rig to routinely run with recurring BSODs amounts to digital Russian Roulette. I strongly urge you to immediately back up your system, then get it running stable. If you're concerned about cooling, then configure your overclock to accommodate proper Core temperatures.

CT :sol:
Hmm. altough i got 2 answers from people that seem to know alot i literly got not even 1 direct answer to the question or matter in this case it could be either because i typed so fast and made onlogical structure in my sentences described above or you guys just didnt understand me but however

in this case its not a problem im experiencing im just asking because i want to OC further.
Im just asking that in the span i use my PC and i dont Experience a BSOD does this make my System Stable?
(Altough if i put it into a stress test for 20 hours it will get a BSOD FOR EXAMPLE1!!11!!1!!.)

So my question was Does under-voltaging have bad effects even if i dont experience any BSOD in my daily span time of using the pc

Oh i do want to input that the 2nd answer did kinda gave me a answer and i want to thank you for that.

Someone also asked my specs altough i think that is irrelevent i will still give them because why not
i7-4770K
B85-G43 Gaming ( oh and please spare me that BS about not being able to OC i already know that)

~kind regards SK023G
 
Jul 21, 2019
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Oh i also wanted to add that : A youtuber said something like this (if im not mistaken) he said i wont give it more Volt because im not gonna use it 100% constantly anyway. What kinda made sense for me

(As in it will survive 100% stressing for like 1 hour but not 4 hours)



PS: Not A (xxxxxx) Youtuber but a streamer/yter i forgot his name but he seem to know alot of stuff.


Oh and 1 more last edit i do want to thank you guys (Both) for putting effort to help me out. dont understand anything of what is said above too seriously.
 
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Instability is a random process. A crash may occur once every 4 hours on average (and this will depend what sort of load you're running), but that doesn't mean it couldn't occur after 1 hour, or 5 minutes, etc. The fact that your typical duration of use is less than the average length of time for a crash to occur doesn't guarantee it'll never crash on you. Plus there's the possibility that even if it doesn't crash outright you could end up with data corruption.
 
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Jul 21, 2019
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Instability is a random process. A crash may occur once every 4 hours on average (and this will depend what sort of load you're running), but that doesn't mean it couldn't occur after 1 hour, or 5 minutes, etc. The fact that your typical duration of use is less than the average length of time for a crash to occur doesn't guarantee it'll never crash on you. Plus there's the possibility that even if it doesn't crash you could end up with data corruption.
Oooh okay so youre saying that even if i it did crashed after 20 hours it could still happen even if its after 1 hour. oh okay so its like Yes/No when it comes to instabillity because i thaught that i could be maybe the that after 10 hours it will became instabile but that was a wrong assumption.
 
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Yes, it's not an issue of instability 'building up' over time until it eventually crashes, it's just random. However there are other factors. For example, if you're running your PC for a while and it's slowly heating up over time that could actually make it less stable and therefore more likely to crash after it's been running for a while. And as I said above, how likely it is to crash also depends on what you're doing.
 

ConanLock

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In regards to you saying I didn't answer the question, I did answer it. See this part.

...even if it never crashes for you, [it] is bad for the CPU, as it won't be running correctly. One day, the CPU might simply fail, and you will be left with the hard job of finding what went wrong, and then have to pay for a replacement.
 
Jul 21, 2019
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It crashes because it's unstable and encounters an error while running. This doesn't mean any physical damage is being caused to the CPU.
Hmm okay i would like to make a conclusion so im sure i got the right data/information regarding the topic if yes i will choose the "Winner/Solution maker" and thank some of you for delivering an answer to my question.

If its unstable its unstable time doesnt matter (Depending on some factors)
It does NOT Damage the CPU if its the cause of a low voltcore related issue (Getting BSOD)
"(Depending on some factors)" one of them were temperatures having a noctua NH D15 i think is enough wink wink but oh well sometimes when i read what people say from the internet is complete BS ..: gaming rig should be starting from 10.000 because people are never happy, so i wont be surprised if some SqUaRepanted face would say No DuDe GeT waTerRcoOleED NhD15 is OlD nOw
 

ConanLock

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May 22, 2019
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If its unstable its unstable time doesnt matter (Depending on some factors) true
It does NOT Damage the CPU if its the cause of a low voltcore related issue (Getting BSOD) true
"(Depending on some factors)" one of them were temperatures having a noctua NH D15 i think is enough wink wink but oh well sometimes when i read what people say from the internet is complete BS ..: gaming rig should be starting from 10.000 because people are never happy, so i wont be surprised if some SqUaRepanted face would say No DuDe GeT waTerRcoOleED NhD15 is OlD nOw sorta
Well seeming as I have now realised you are setting vcore too low, and not too high, I guess that makes what I said about the overclock damaging the CPU irrelevant.
As for temps, it really depends on what is being cooled, how much it is overclocked, and what the cooler used is. For example, if you have an i9 9900k with a +30% clock speed increase and +0.5 vcore increase, I really doubt anything but the top water cooler will do. However, when crashes do occur in an overclocked system, regardless of how well cooled, one thing to look at is the temps. This is because you can't simply add volts to increase speed - there is an end, and this is where the temps limit the system, or when the CPU just cannot go on. In your case, monitoring temps should be done, as should in any overclock, to see whether you have gone too far. I highly doubt temps will be anything to worry about with your current cooler though.
 
Jul 21, 2019
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Well seeming as I have now realised you are setting vcore too low, and not too high, I guess that makes what I said about the overclock damaging the CPU irrelevant.
As for temps, it really depends on what is being cooled, how much it is overclocked, and what the cooler used is. For example, if you have an i9 9900k with a +30% clock speed increase and +0.5 vcore increase, I really doubt anything but the top water cooler will do. However, when crashes do occur in an overclocked system, regardless of how well cooled, one thing to look at is the temps. This is because you can't simply add volts to increase speed - there is an end, and this is where the temps limit the system, or when the CPU just cannot go on. In your case, monitoring temps should be done, as should in any overclock, to see whether you have gone too far. I highly doubt temps will be anything to worry about with your current cooler though.

" I really doubt anything but the top water cooler will do. "
Yeah dude a watercooler instead of a tower with 2 fans is really gonna make that extra huge difference while clocking right? https://i.ytimg.com/vi/pdvXuGm8Zac/maxresdefault.jpg

Like honestly if you could save me the Doubts and just come with facts or answers that would be appreciated

~Oh and Thank you all for answering (d/m right or not)
 
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ConanLock

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May 22, 2019
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" I really doubt anything but the top water cooler will do. "
Yeah dude a watercooler instead of a tower with 2 fans is really gonna make that extra huge difference while clocking right? https://i.ytimg.com/vi/pdvXuGm8Zac/maxresdefault.jpg

Like honestly if you could save me the Doubts and just come with facts or answers that would be appreciated

~Oh and Thank you all for answering (d/m right or not)
I think you either misunderstood the context of that quote, or didn't read it. Either way, it's alright, happy you have found the answer.
 
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