[SOLVED] Overheating issue

Aug 7, 2020
10
0
10
0
Hi guys I'm new here but I figured this is the best place to get help regarding my overheating issue.

I just built my PC last month and recently it has been experiencing overheating issue to the point where it force shuts down several times to cool itself down. I'll list down a few parts of my PC that might help identify the overheating issues:

  • Ryzen 7 3700x
  • MSI B550 Gaming Carbon Pro WiFi
  • MSI RTX 2070 Super Gaming X Trio
  • Cooler Master MB530P casing
I'm currently using the stock fan aka AMD Wraith PRISM Cooler with the pre-applied thermal paste and heat sink that came alongside the Ryzen processor. However My PC seems to be idling around 60°C whenever I boot up which seems usually hot. I've even tweaked the fan speed to run at least 2700 RPM and above just to bring down the temperature but it doesn't seem to work at all.

I did a quick test earlier when I boot up my PC for the first time today and here's the scenario:

  • No apps running with the exception of Core Temp to measure the temperature
  • The most CPU consuming app running in the background is my animated desktop wallpaper which consumes only 4% so I'll leave that alone
  • After 15 mins I'll run Valorant and play for 15 mins
The temperature results in min/average/max are:

When booting up
- 60°C / 60°C / 60°C

After 15 mins of idling
- 43°C / 60°C / 74°C

After 15 mins of Valorant
- 43°C / 72°C / 86°C

As you can see, my PC gets very heated up easily even when just idling. On an average day of usage it stays around 65°C which is still very hot for just casually browsing the web even with the fan tweaked to run at least 2700 RPM and above.

I'm no professional when it comes to PC but I suspect that my fan and thermal paste are the ones causing the issue. I plan to bring back the whole Ryzen set and exchange for a new one because I believe by after several shut downs due to overheating, my processor is more or less damaged from the heat.

But before that, I want to find out what's really causing my PC to overheat which is the reason why I came to this form and ask for help and hope that some of y'all who are proficient in PC can help a newbie out here. Sorry for the very long post but I thought I should just explained everything at once so it's easier to identify the issue.

Cheers
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
Well my PC is already at 60°C when I boot up the PC so my air cooler faulty then?
OK. The in-bios temp? IGNORE IT. It's not doing any harm.
The desktop idle temp? IGNORE IT. Again, it's not doing any harm.
Your cpu's load thermals are what matter - and from what info you've provided so far, the stock cooler is not adequate for gaming on. The rest is fine.
The higher idle thermals are normal for these cpus - get used to it. It's a combination of:
-your room ambient
-chassis ambient
-temperature of the air entering the cpu cooler
-heatsink capability
-the thermal density of TSMC's 7nm process for AMD's Ryzen 3000 cpus
-Ryzen 3000's very bursty boost behavior under light loads. It's far more subtle when the load is heavy enough


Sorry, there's just been so many threads about idle thermals on these cpus already, when it wasn't a problem to begin with.
The cooler isn't faulty, it's just not adequate for your uses.
 
Reactions: TheNerdyGlaceon

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

CoolerMaster should start naming most of the all TG panel cases as HotBox's as opposed to MasterBox's. You forgot to mention the make and model of your PSU as well as the fans that are in your chassis. Have you tried breadboarding the innards to see if the temps are better outside of the case?

I suspect your airflow isn't good or the air intake is limited or the CPU cooler wasn't seated right or your ambient room air temps are high.

Which version of Windows 10 are you on? Latest BIOS update for the B550 motherboard?
 
Aug 7, 2020
10
0
10
0
Thank you for the warm welcome!

I'm using a Seasonic Focus GM-750 Gold PSU. Inside the MB530P casing there's 3 front RGB fans and 1 back fan. I didn't add any extra fans so there's only 4 in total. I've already cleared the dust off the mesh on the front panel but the temperature is still roughly 60°C.

As for breadboarding, I'm not very confident about taking out the parts especially the motherboard and I would rather ask my friend to do so for me. However I just took off the glass and pointed one of my stand fans at max speed directly onto my PC parts and the temperature did change but slightly an it's jumping up and down (55°C ~65°C) which means it's unstable even with additional airflow intake.

I've asked around my friends before asking this forum about my issue and many also said that perhaps the fan wasn't mounted properly but my friend who actually helped me build my PC said he mounted it properly so I'm guessing that the fan is faulty instead. As for the room temperature, yes it's quite humid in here and I suspect that it also contributed to the overheating issue. I would consider getting a portable A/C but that will just spike up the electric bill.

Hence I'm considering getting an AIO instead of air cooler unless you reckon that air cooler is good enough because I fear of water leakage from AIO and I heard that their lifespan is about a few years before it starts to deteriorate from algae and rust occurring inside the AIO.

Also I'm running on unactivated Windows 10 because I forgot about it and I've updated my BIOS to the latest version just after the latest sudden shut down due to overheating which was last week. Could my motherboard be causing the issue too? I still have warranty so I can exchange the processor as well as the motherboard or could the PSU be causing the issue too?

Cheers
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
Well my PC is already at 60°C when I boot up the PC so my air cooler faulty then?
OK. The in-bios temp? IGNORE IT. It's not doing any harm.
The desktop idle temp? IGNORE IT. Again, it's not doing any harm.
Your cpu's load thermals are what matter - and from what info you've provided so far, the stock cooler is not adequate for gaming on. The rest is fine.
The higher idle thermals are normal for these cpus - get used to it. It's a combination of:
-your room ambient
-chassis ambient
-temperature of the air entering the cpu cooler
-heatsink capability
-the thermal density of TSMC's 7nm process for AMD's Ryzen 3000 cpus
-Ryzen 3000's very bursty boost behavior under light loads. It's far more subtle when the load is heavy enough


Sorry, there's just been so many threads about idle thermals on these cpus already, when it wasn't a problem to begin with.
The cooler isn't faulty, it's just not adequate for your uses.
 
Reactions: TheNerdyGlaceon
Aug 8, 2020
1
0
10
0
That's unusual high idle temp, are you sure you installed your cooler correctly ? No gaps between heatsink and cpu ? And you said recently, so at first it was ok ?

Edit: Ah sorry just noticed your second post, you already checked mounting
 
Aug 7, 2020
10
0
10
0
OK. The in-bios temp? IGNORE IT. It's not doing any harm.
The desktop idle temp? IGNORE IT. Again, it's not doing any harm.
Your cpu's load thermals are what matter - and from what info you've provided so far, the stock cooler is not adequate for gaming on. The rest is fine.
The higher idle thermals are normal for these cpus - get used to it. It's a combination of:
-your room ambient
-chassis ambient
-temperature of the air entering the cpu cooler
-heatsink capability
-the thermal density of TSMC's 7nm process for AMD's Ryzen 3000 cpus
-Ryzen 3000's very bursty boost behavior under light loads. It's far more subtle when the load is heavy enough


Sorry, there's just been so many threads about idle thermals on these cpus already, when it wasn't a problem to begin with.
The cooler isn't faulty, it's just not adequate for your uses.
Apologies for posting something that has been asked countless times because I didn't think anyone else would be using a stock air cooler with stock thermal paste especially given my setup which is more towards the higher end and almost everyone would be getting a decent air cooler or even an AIO but for my case I over budget my setup so I sticked to using the stock air cooler as I thought it was good enough.

However I would like to know if my processor has been permanently damaged, even in the slightest, from overheating to the point whereby the PC had to force shutdown to prevent further damages to the processor and other parts. Is there a way to find out or test it out?

Cheers
 
Aug 7, 2020
10
0
10
0
That's unusual high idle temp, are you sure you installed your cooler correctly ? No gaps between heatsink and cpu ? And you said recently, so at first it was ok ?

Edit: Ah sorry just noticed your second post, you already checked mounting
I've not tried to remount the air cooler yet as I don't have any thermal paste with me. I'll try to get some from my friends if they have any then reinstall the air cooler and run it again to see if either thermal paste, mounting or faulty fan/heatsink was the issue.

Cheers
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
However I would like to know if my processor has been permanently damaged, even in the slightest, from overheating to the point whereby the PC had to force shutdown to prevent further damages to the processor and other parts.
No. If the cpu sits at 95C for an extended period of time, then it shuts the system down. Something else caused your forced shutdown.
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
I noticed you're using Core Temp. Use hwinfo(Sensors Only) instead. Ryzen Master also works.
Monitor cpu thermals with one of those instead; see if the cpu even gets to 95C before one of these power offs happen.

How do I find out the other parts that might had caused the force shut down then?
-Gpu will also cause shutdowns if it's overheating
-Missing or corrupted Windows drivers. For that, there's this: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4026529/windows-10-using-system-file-checker
-Memory corruption. Memtest86 free version: https://www.memtest86.com/
-Some 3rd party programs don't get along when on the same system. Vague, I know - not sure how else to put that one. It could be 2 AVs, or Windows not liking outdated drivers for your keyboard or something. Software's a pain in the butt...
 
Aug 7, 2020
10
0
10
0
My friend came to troubleshoot my PC yesterday and we found out lots of problem:

  • Stock thermal paste almost dried up and there were spills at the side of the processor so props to AMD for that
  • He applied Noctua NT-H1 onto my processor and although there wasn't enough, it did perform slightly better than the stock thermal paste
  • Putting 2 case fans on the top radiator did help bring down the temperature by a reasonable amount
  • Temperature still jumps up and down from 55°C ~65°C so it's probably also processor issue itself because my old pre-built PC of 5+ years was idling at 47°C all the way when booted up and doing nothing for over 15 mins
  • Front 3 fans air intake is horrible because the air intake is only from the side mesh and the front glass is just for aesthetic
In conclusion, the humid room, poor air intake and poor stock thermal paste caused my PC to overheat. I've decided to get an AIO instead of air cooler mainly because of my room temperature and also I'll have to install more fans if I go for the air cooler setup which the total cost isn't far away from an AIO.

Thanks for all the help guys, I appreciate it!

Cheers
 
Last edited:

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
Stock thermal paste almost dried up and there were spills at the side of the processor so props to AMD for that
That's normal, in fact, I'd say you found a red herring...

He applied Noctua NT-H1 onto my processor and although there wasn't enough, it did perform slightly better than the stock thermal paste
The purpose of thermal paste is a bridge, not actual cooling. That result is expected.

Putting 2 case fans on the top radiator did help bring down the temperature by a reasonable amount
Brute force air method in a PC lacking it. It works to an extent.

Temperature still jumps up and down from 55°C ~65°C so it's probably also processor issue itself because my old pre-built PC of 5+ years was idling at 47°C all the way when booted up and doing nothing for over 15 mins
Compare Ryzen 3000 to other Ryzen 3000s. Anything else may as well be invalid. It's just not the same.

Front 3 fans air intake is horrible because the air intake is only from the side mesh and the front glass is just for aesthetic
Bingo!
To add to this, the closer to a solid surface the fans are, the less air they'll bring in. If you can install them BEHIND THE FAN BRACKET, that'll give them a little more 'breathing room'.
The other is LED fans. They are weaker than their non-LED counterparts(if they exist). The reason is power budget: the manufacturers want to keep within a certain degree of power consumption, and fan strength is sacrificed. Those LEDs don't just cost more...


"In conclusion, the humid room, poor air intake and poor stock thermal paste caused my PC to overheat."
[Fixed.]

"I've decided to get an AIO instead of air cooler mainly because of my room temperature...
[Room temp is?
The temperature of the air that will be going into the cooler is? You can't disregard the exhaust from the gpu.
Liquid coolers are just hybrid air coolers, and are just as dependent on good airflow, if not more so. You'll probably find yourself having to brute force it as well because of your chassis' poor airflow, or else the liquid flow will be doing the bulk of the cooling, and that only goes so far.]

"...and also I'll have to install more fans if I go for the air cooler setup which the total cost isn't far away from an AIO."
[That's actually reasonable.]
 
Reactions: VedaReborn
Aug 7, 2020
10
0
10
0
Bingo!
To add to this, the closer to a solid surface the fans are, the less air they'll bring in. If you can install them BEHIND THE FAN BRACKET, that'll give them a little more 'breathing room'.
The other is LED fans. They are weaker than their non-LED counterparts(if they exist). The reason is power budget: the manufacturers want to keep within a certain degree of power consumption, and fan strength is sacrificed. Those LEDs don't just cost more...
I could try to install the fans further back or even better, convert it into exhaust instead of intake since the air intake in the first place is bad to me and there has been mixed reviews saying that the front air intake is either good or bad and one even said removing the front glass only drops the temperature by 1~2°C.

"In conclusion, the humid room, poor air intake and poor stock thermal paste caused my PC to overheat."
[Fixed.]

"I've decided to get an AIO instead of air cooler mainly because of my room temperature...
[Room temp is?
The temperature of the air that will be going into the cooler is? You can't disregard the exhaust from the gpu.
Liquid coolers are just hybrid air coolers, and are just as dependent on good airflow, if not more so. You'll probably find yourself having to brute force it as well because of your chassis' poor airflow, or else the liquid flow will be doing the bulk of the cooling, and that only goes so far.]
Didn't you say that one of the factors contributing to my CPU temperature is the room ambient? As I said before my room is humid so the air intake hotter than the average room temperature thus it won't help much to cool down my CPU compared to a cooler air intake.

Then again it's not the sole reason why my PC is overheating. I might be wrong though, we'll see when my AIO arrives.

Cheers
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
convert it into exhaust instead of intake
I can't imagine that working out so well. Think again on that, please.

one even said removing the front glass only drops the temperature by 1~2°C.
That person didn't even do it correctly. Front, side, and top panels should be removed when testing how much the chassis restricts airflow.

Didn't you say that one of the factors contributing to my CPU temperature is the room ambient?
Idle temps and chassis ambient. Room ambient has little to do with thermals when either cpu or gpu is under load.
If the cpu or gpu coolers can't get enough air, they 'cool down' on their own exhaust. All I see here is a lack of intake air.

An AIO/CLC won't magically fix things either.
Mount the block on the cpu, and the radiator in the front, and now the gpu is running warmer; what little air it was getting that way was reduced further.
Not to mention in that same orientation, the radiator fans have to work harder to get air through and the Ryzen 3000 cpu will try to boost higher if the thermal headroom is available...
The base plate and the pump speed is the weakness of AIO/CLC coolers; a front mount appears to be the worst position for one in this chassis, because the liquid flow is going to be doing the bulk of the cooling.

Top exhaust would be the optimal location and orientation for the liquid cooler.
 
Aug 7, 2020
10
0
10
0
I can't imagine that working out so well. Think again on that, please.
Haha I guess that's a bad idea then.

Idle temps and chassis ambient. Room ambient has little to do with thermals when either cpu or gpu is under load.
If the cpu or gpu coolers can't get enough air, they 'cool down' on their own exhaust. All I see here is a lack of intake air.

An AIO/CLC won't magically fix things either.
Mount the block on the cpu, and the radiator in the front, and now the gpu is running warmer; what little air it was getting that way was reduced further.
Not to mention in that same orientation, the radiator fans have to work harder to get air through and the Ryzen 3000 cpu will try to boost higher if the thermal headroom is available...
The base plate and the pump speed is the weakness of AIO/CLC coolers; a front mount appears to be the worst position for one in this chassis, because the liquid flow is going to be doing the bulk of the cooling.

Top exhaust would be the optimal location and orientation for the liquid cooler.
It does make more sense now that room ambient didn't affect that much. My old PC was on the floor under the table all the time which already restricted some airflow into the casing. However it wasn't running as hot as my new PC and I'm guessing that a more powerful machine will require more cooling to keep the system cool, correct me if I'm wrong on that.

I'm getting the MSI MAG Coreliquid 240R to install on the top radiator since that's the best place for airflow for my casing and I don't want to replace the front fans with AIO either even if I could install the 360R version as I wanted aesthetic which is why I bought the casing in the first place. Hopefully installing the AIO will solves my issue.

Cheers
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY