Question Overheating

Aug 6, 2019
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i7 6700k and I mostly use it for gaming but cpu causes fps drops and I think it is because it overheats because it runs I constant 100 degrees. Please tell me what should I do
 

WildCard999

Titan
Herald
If it's running at 100C then yes it's too hot (it should be under 80C).

Things you can do...

-Clean the system of dust.
-Clean the CPU cooler, you also may want to clean off the current thermal paste and reapply.
-If the above options don't get it under 80C then you may want to consider a better aftermarket cooler.
-If the CPU is overclocked then revert it back to stock until the temp issue is fixed.
 

13thmonkey

Titan
Moderator
If it's running at 100C then yes it's too hot (it should be under 80C).

Things you can do...

-Clean the system of dust.
-Clean the CPU cooler, you also may want to clean off the current thermal paste and reapply.
-If the above options don't get it under 80C then you may want to consider a better aftermarket cooler.
-If the CPU is overclocked then revert it back to stock until the temp issue is fixed.
at that temp it's only ever contact pressure.
 

13thmonkey

Titan
Moderator
precisely, poor contact pressure, is the only cause of very high temps (95+) at idle. If it was only 20C over expected values then it could be a range of things, but at that level... only poor thermal contact, essentially the HS can't do anything.
 
Reactions: WildCard999
Aug 6, 2019
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precisely, poor contact pressure, is the only cause of very high temps (95+) at idle. If it was only 20C over expected values then it could be a range of things, but at that level... only poor thermal contact, essentially the HS can't do anything.
I actually have an hp omen x pc. Please tell me how can I properly fit my cooler
 
Aug 6, 2019
7
0
10
0
If it's running at 100C then yes it's too hot (it should be under 80C).

Things you can do...

-Clean the system of dust.
-Clean the CPU cooler, you also may want to clean off the current thermal paste and reapply.
-If the above options don't get it under 80C then you may want to consider a better aftermarket cooler.
-If the CPU is overclocked then revert it back to stock until the temp issue is fixed.
Well I did all of that but nothing helped but I am thinking of buying a new cooler. thanks for the suggestion
 

CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
Abdullah Aslam,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

• As my esteemed colleague, 13thmonkey has determined, you have a flow problem, which is typical for an AIO. However, pump RPM doesn't prove or verify that flow is OK.

Apart from the potential for a coolant leak, there are four problems common to AIO's:

(1) All AIO's will eventually fail. It’s not a question of if; it’s a question of when. Pumps can have component failures in the electronics that drive the impeller, which is a moving part that can wear out, so those which run 24/7/365 are prone to premature failure. AIO units are notorious for failures due to inferior pump quality, whereas custom loops typically use high-end pumps which have greater longevity.

(2) Coolant can slowly evaporate over time due to "permeation". However unlikely it may seem, coolant can actually dissipate directly through the tubes. This can introduce bubbles into the impeller chamber causing "cavitation", whereby coolant flow is impeded or interrupted.

(3) AIO's are sealed Closed Loop Coolers (CLC), which unlike custom loops, are not designed to be disassembled for the water block and impeller to be flushed, cleaned of bio-contaminants and radiator sediments, then refilled. Bio-contaminants gradually accumulate over time and will eventually clog the water block and radiator tubes, thereby reducing flow and thermal efficiency. This is evidenced by Core temperatures that slowly increase over periods of several months to a few years.

(4) Also unlike custom loops, AIO's use dissimilar metals (aluminum radiator / copper water block). This causes galvanic corrosion which produces sediments that accumulate over time, resulting in blockages and flow problems. Even new AIO's may contain radiator sediments due to inadequate flushing after manufacturing. Experienced builders of custom loops will always thoroughly flush brand-new radiators. Flux, solder and metal fragments are typically found in the flush water when it's poured through a strainer.

For no apparent reason ... or ... by simply installing, moving, tipping, handling or otherwise disturbing a new OR old unit, particles can become dislodged, whereupon the next power-up, the now free-floating particles can circulate into the impeller chamber and restrict or completely stop the impeller. Since the impeller is magnetically coupled to the stator (no direct shaft), the unit may "appear" that it's running while the impeller is restricted or stalled. "Hearing" the unit running or "feeling" vibration can be deceiving as it does not necessarily indicate flow, nor does Pump RPM in BIOS or various software utilities. Moreover, as fan vibration can "telegraph" throughout the entire AIO unit, it's often mistaken for pump vibration.

Without an actual in-line sensor, proper flow is difficult to confirm. Under normal operation, even with the CPU at 100% workload, there should be only a minimal temperature differential between the tubes. However, if one tube is hot while the other is cool, or the water block is hot while the radiator is cool, it indicates little to no flow. Surface temperatures can be verified with an infrared (IR) thermometer.

Since your AIO is probably a few years old, it's highly likely that bio-contaminants and particles from galvanic corrosion are impeding coolant flow as they circulate throughout the unit.

• If your PC is still under warranty from HP, then you need to have them replace the cooler. If the warranty is expired, then you need to replace the cooler yourself, or have it replaced by a local PC shop.

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
 
Aug 6, 2019
7
0
10
0
Abdullah Aslam,

On behalf of Tom's Moderator Team, welcome aboard!

• As my esteemed colleague, 13thmonkey has determined, you have a flow problem, which is typical for an AIO. However, pump RPM doesn't prove or verify that flow is OK.

Apart from the potential for a coolant leak, there are four problems common to AIO's:

(1) All AIO's will eventually fail. It’s not a question of if; it’s a question of when. Pumps can have component failures in the electronics that drive the impeller, which is a moving part that can wear out, so those which run 24/7/365 are prone to premature failure. AIO units are notorious for failures due to inferior pump quality, whereas custom loops typically use high-end pumps which have greater longevity.

(2) Coolant can slowly evaporate over time due to "permeation". However unlikely it may seem, coolant can actually dissipate directly through the tubes. This can introduce bubbles into the impeller chamber causing "cavitation", whereby coolant flow is impeded or interrupted.

(3) AIO's are sealed Closed Loop Coolers (CLC), which unlike custom loops, are not designed to be disassembled for the water block and impeller to be flushed, cleaned of bio-contaminants and radiator sediments, then refilled. Bio-contaminants gradually accumulate over time and will eventually clog the water block and radiator tubes, thereby reducing flow and thermal efficiency. This is evidenced by Core temperatures that slowly increase over periods of several months to a few years.

(4) Also unlike custom loops, AIO's use dissimilar metals (aluminum radiator / copper water block). This causes galvanic corrosion which produces sediments that accumulate over time, resulting in blockages and flow problems. Even new AIO's may contain radiator sediments due to inadequate flushing after manufacturing. Experienced builders of custom loops will always thoroughly flush brand-new radiators. Flux, solder and metal fragments are typically found in the flush water when it's poured through a strainer.

For no apparent reason ... or ... by simply installing, moving, tipping, handling or otherwise disturbing a new OR old unit, particles can become dislodged, whereupon the next power-up, the now free-floating particles can circulate into the impeller chamber and restrict or completely stop the impeller. Since the impeller is magnetically coupled to the stator (no direct shaft), the unit may "appear" that it's running while the impeller is restricted or stalled. "Hearing" the unit running or "feeling" vibration can be deceiving as it does not necessarily indicate flow, nor does Pump RPM in BIOS or various software utilities. Moreover, as fan vibration can "telegraph" throughout the entire AIO unit, it's often mistaken for pump vibration.

Without an actual in-line sensor, proper flow is difficult to confirm. Under normal operation, even with the CPU at 100% workload, there should be only a minimal temperature differential between the tubes. However, if one tube is hot while the other is cool, or the water block is hot while the radiator is cool, it indicates little to no flow. Surface temperatures can be verified with an infrared (IR) thermometer.

Since your AIO is probably a few years old, it's highly likely that bio-contaminants and particles from galvanic corrosion are impeding coolant flow as they circulate throughout the unit.

• If your PC is still under warranty from HP, then you need to have them replace the cooler. If the warranty is expired, then you need to replace the cooler yourself, or have it replaced by a local PC shop.

Once again, welcome aboard!

CT :sol:
Thanks alot man!!! I was thinking myself that why is one of my tubes alot hotter than other and I was extremely worried about it but you helped me alot. thanks again. BTW please tell me that if I use an air cooler instaed of a liquid cooler, will there be any problem?
 

CompuTronix

Judicious
Moderator
BTW please tell me that if I use an air cooler instead of a liquid cooler, will there be any problem?
Air coolers tend to be extremely reliable as fan failures are infrequent. However, my opinion concerning push-pin coolers differs somewhat from boju.

Aftermarket coolers with push-pin fasteners are notorious for temperature problems due to push-pins pulling loose from the motherboard, which is exactly why so many users have the same problem with Intel's stock coolers. Coolers with push-pins should be avoided in favor of coolers which use proper fastening hardware with a backplate. Except for the push-pins, the Gammaxx 400 is actually a decent cooler.

Although the HP Omen X is a "cube" shape case, it should have ample room for this cooler, but it's best to measure from the top of the CPU to the underside of the case cover. Further, if the case provides easy access to the back of the motherboard CPU socket, then a cooler with a backplate should also be easy to install. If there's instead no access but you're OK with removing the motherboard, then either way a Hyper 212 EVO or a Cryorig H7 would be superior choices. If you're not comfortable with removing the motherboard, then as per boju's suggestion, the Gammaxx 400 would indeed still be a good choice.

Keep in mind that in terms of problems and common points of failure, push-pins are to air coolers as what pumps are to liquid coolers. As boju mentioned, good case airflow is always essential, regardless of whether you have air or liquid cooling. Since it appears that your HP Omen X has a single intake fan, and uses the 120mm fan on the liquid cooler for an exhaust fan, you'll need to remove the fan from the liquid cooler, then reinstall it in the case so that the case still has an exhaust fan to support an air cooler.

Check the fan and case to see whether you can re-use the existing fan screws, or if you'll need to purchase different length screws. Also, if the motherboard doesn't have a spare fan header, then you'll need to purchase a splitter cable, as you'll be running a total of 3 fans instead of 2.

CT :sol:
 
Reactions: boju
Aug 6, 2019
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Thank you for your help guys. I got alot of knowledge from you guys and especially Toms moderator who told me how to check if my cooler was broken and surprisingly enough my pump was not working but now I got a Corsair H45 liquid cooler and its working amazingly for me.
Thanks alot to the people who created such an amazing platform for pc enthusiasts to discuss and debate their issues.
 

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