Question Packet Loss - Latency Problem

Biggy Cent

Honorable
Jan 14, 2014
24
0
10,510
0
I have a gaming PC that's running
-Windows 7
-MSI mobo
-Corsair 1200watt PSU
-Wired
Router- Netgear R700P
Modem- Arris DG860
My ISP is TSC (telserco.com) and its cable

I've been running Ping Plotter and tracking some data and noticing I'm getting around 12% packet loss and sometimes my ping will spike to 150ish

Firmware on Router is up to date.

Ping Plotter

Any suggestions on more testing I can do to diagnose how to fix this would be greatly appreciated.
 
Pingplotter may be telling lies. You are getting only 4% loss on the end node but it could be a random thing.

I would use a actual ping command and see if you actually get loss to your router IP.

This is very rare on a wired connection. It almost always is a bad ethernet cable. It could be the ports or very unlikely drivers but not real likely. I would try a new cable. Make sure the able is cat5e or better and is pure copper (no cca) and has wire size 22-24 (no flat or thin cable)
 

Biggy Cent

Honorable
Jan 14, 2014
24
0
10,510
0
Pingplotter may be telling lies. You are getting only 4% loss on the end node but it could be a random thing.

I would use a actual ping command and see if you actually get loss to your router IP.

This is very rare on a wired connection. It almost always is a bad ethernet cable. It could be the ports or very unlikely drivers but not real likely. I would try a new cable. Make sure the able is cat5e or better and is pure copper (no cca) and has wire size 22-24 (no flat or thin cable)
When you say ping command do you mean opening command print and pinging 8.8.8.8 or what? Sorry I’m kinda new to this.

Slowdowns/lag peaks around Hop 5- 6...

Not in your control and likely outside of your ISP.
i thought the first 3 were the only ones to worry about? The one node is like chicago and it’s nowhere near close to me.
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
"chicks"? I do not understand?

The path taken by the packets can and will vary depending on things such as packet traffic, weather, server availability, the available communication connections, etc..

Once the outbound packet leaves your router (192.168.1.1) and passes through the modem then your ISP is in control depending on what service level you are contracted for and what they may be able to provide at any given time.

Then once beyond your ISP then there is no direct control available to them or you.

If you want to understand it all a bit more:

https://www.explainthatstuff.com/internet.html
 

Biggy Cent

Honorable
Jan 14, 2014
24
0
10,510
0
"chicks"? I do not understand?

The path taken by the packets can and will vary depending on things such as packet traffic, weather, server availability, the available communication connections, etc..

Once the outbound packet leaves your router (192.168.1.1) and passes through the modem then your ISP is in control depending on what service level you are contracted for and what they may be able to provide at any given time.

Then once beyond your ISP then there is no direct control available to them or you.

If you want to understand it all a bit more:

https://www.explainthatstuff.com/internet.html
I meant Chicago lol. Auto correct.
 
You need to ping the ip addresses you see in the ping plotter. You need to do a ping plot yourself.

The results are inconsistent. If you actually have 19% packet loss at your router how can you have 0% in hop when the data must pass through hop 1 to get to hop 2.

The latency is the same way how can hops in the middle really have latency of more than 100ms when the last hop is only 25ms.

The data is very suspect so you need to do better testing to find the real numbers.

BUT what can you possibly do if the problem is in say level3 or google network. Your best hope is that the 19% number indicates a actual issue with your pc or router that you can fix.
 

Biggy Cent

Honorable
Jan 14, 2014
24
0
10,510
0
You need to ping the ip addresses you see in the ping plotter. You need to do a ping plot yourself.

The results are inconsistent. If you actually have 19% packet loss at your router how can you have 0% in hop when the data must pass through hop 1 to get to hop 2.

The latency is the same way how can hops in the middle really have latency of more than 100ms when the last hop is only 25ms.

The data is very suspect so you need to do better testing to find the real numbers.

BUT what can you possibly do if the problem is in say level3 or google network. Your best hope is that the 19% number indicates a actual issue with your pc or router that you can fix.
Alright so I basically need to ping hop 1,2, and 3?
 

Biggy Cent

Honorable
Jan 14, 2014
24
0
10,510
0
I went ahead and pinged the first 3 IPs and this is what i got instantly today around 3:30pm.

The first IP shoulder be my router, second modem, and 3rd ISP?

Ping

and then this one a few minutes later - Ping 2
 
Last edited:
Hop 2 in your case is likely the first ISP router at their office. Modems you can not even detect. A second device in your house would have very low latency and you are showing 7ms minimum which means it is far away.

You can call your ISP and see if they can fix this. Do not use pingplot they will blame the tool. Use actual ping commands in cmd windows and run ping to hop 1 and hop 2 at the same time.

Now be aware you also need to run a ping to the final node to show loss at the same time you take loss in hop 2. If you only get loss in the intermediate nodes it means nothing because the ISP may have their router configured to ignore ping requests if it is busy. Some other ISP only allow a router to respond to so many pings/sec to avoid denial of service attacks.

The ISP will deny everything so you have to have very clear proof. You use normal ping commands because the level 1 tech will not understand pingplot and claim it is the tool.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS