[SOLVED] Page Fault In Nonpaged Area

Kotreb

Honorable
May 24, 2014
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Hello,

I'm having a great deal of trouble with BSOD related to that error and with "critical structure corruption" error. This is really disheartening since PC is brand new, new windows, everything except keyboard and mouse. At first I couldn't figure out the times when BSOD would occur, but now it seems like it happens whenever PC goes into stand-by mode, well actually after it comes back from stand-by mode. Sometimes I get BSOD instantly, and sometimes a couple of minutes pass, but it's always the same story. I've tried first 5 steps from this link www.minitool.com but it seems that the problem persists. I tried running memtest, no error was reported (i let it run for 4 times/circles). Does anyone have an idea what can i do to fix the error? I also tried everything suggested in THIS post also, but to no avail.

I downloaded blue screen viewer and it seems like every BSOD is due to the "ntoskrnl.exe" error. Quick googling gives me the idea that the cause is approximately the same as before :(

All of my drivers are up to date, and i checked every disc. Only thing left to do is to reinstall windows, try new bios (??? maybe that could help), and finally take a look at ram (I pray to god that it isn't ram fault).

On a side note, does this that my RAM speed is 1600 or 3200 like it should be? Thank you for your time and responses

<a href="https://imgbb.com/"><img src="https://i.ibb.co/VjLwr1Z/RAM-speed.png" alt="RAM-speed" border="0"></a>
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I know this was briefly mentioned, but make sure that they are installed in the A2 and B2 slots, for sure. Those are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU socket, with the B2 slot, for ALL dual channel motherboards, being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard and the A2 slot being two slots to the left of that one. If there are there, then that is the end of that part.

The next question I would have is whether or not you have the most recent motherboard BIOS version installed. If you do not, then you should do that before you do anything else.

Once that has been done, I would make sure you have the most recent AMD X570 chipset drivers installed as available on the AMD website, NOT on the motherboard product page.

These:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/x570



Then, after all of that is done, it would be helpful to know how long your TX power supply has been in service, because out of spec voltage fluctuations or low voltage levels can easily be the source of a variety of hardware problems, even memory errors. Maybe ESPECIALLY memory errors, since memory is particularly dependent on stable voltage, in sufficient quantity, to remain stable.

It could certainly be memory related though so I'd run all 11 tests (Free version skips 2 tests between 1 and 13) for 4 passes of all 11, in Memtest, to ensure there are no memory physical or configuration problems. If you pass all four passes, and this will take several hours to complete, then we can move on from there.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.

Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86 (NOT Memtest86+, that is a different, older version and is outdated). Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 
Reactions: TJ Hooker

Nemesia

Commendable
Nov 6, 2019
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The RAM you have can go to 3200Mhz. At the moment you're running them at 2133Mhz. Please provide your entire specs.

We need to know what speed your memory controller can support. If your system can use the 3200MHz just go in your BIOS and set the XMP profile to 3200Mhz.
 
Last edited:

Kotreb

Honorable
May 24, 2014
16
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Thank you for the reply. My specs are:
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
ASUS Prime X570-P
Sapphire RX5700 XT Pulse 8GB
DDR4 32GB (2x16) G.Skill 3200Mhz Ripjaws V
Corsair 750W TX750M

Do you have any suggestion on how to fix the BSOD problem?
 

Nemesia

Commendable
Nov 6, 2019
1,339
228
1,290
56
Thank you for the reply. My specs are:
AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
ASUS Prime X570-P
Sapphire RX5700 XT Pulse 8GB
DDR4 32GB (2x16) G.Skill 3200Mhz Ripjaws V
Corsair 750W TX750M

Do you have any suggestion on how to fix the BSOD problem?
I just realized something. In your CPUZ memory speed tab. It shows that your first DDR4 RAM Stick is in the first slot on the board. So I assume you have put the 2 sticks in B1 and A1. This isn't the right way for your motherboard.

https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/SocketAM4/PRIME_X570-P/E15650_PRIME_X570-P_UM_WEB_V2.pdf?_ga=2.84072976.887150461.1575930756-295393497.1575930756

Chapter 1 page 1-5. Your RAM needs to be put in the B2 and A2 slots. This is probably the cause of your problem right there. Seat them in the right slots. Go in the BIOS and look at the XMP profile to be sure it's set properly. Boot to windows and paste a screenshot again of both the sticks in the speed tab and the memory tab from CPUZ :)
 

Kotreb

Honorable
May 24, 2014
16
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Jesus christ, if that's the answer to my problems I will name all of my babies after you. If this gets me rid of BSOD I will literally write a book about your genius. At first I did have them slotted into A2 and B2, but after I moved them A1 and B1 everything worked much faster so i thought that's the better way. Gonna try it on now, will let you know the results
 

Nemesia

Commendable
Nov 6, 2019
1,339
228
1,290
56
If anyone in here can tell the OP how to set up his memory speed in the BIOS without using the XMP and by setting it up manually in his BIOS that would be fantastic. XMP can cause problems too on some system and you have to manually set the speed, clocks and everything yourself. Let's hope you do not have a BSOD again and if you do let us know :)
 

Kotreb

Honorable
May 24, 2014
16
0
10,510
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Yeah, I got BSOD again -.- don't know what can I do at this point. Going to try testing it with Prime95 and follow TJ's last post.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I know this was briefly mentioned, but make sure that they are installed in the A2 and B2 slots, for sure. Those are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU socket, with the B2 slot, for ALL dual channel motherboards, being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard and the A2 slot being two slots to the left of that one. If there are there, then that is the end of that part.

The next question I would have is whether or not you have the most recent motherboard BIOS version installed. If you do not, then you should do that before you do anything else.

Once that has been done, I would make sure you have the most recent AMD X570 chipset drivers installed as available on the AMD website, NOT on the motherboard product page.

These:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/x570



Then, after all of that is done, it would be helpful to know how long your TX power supply has been in service, because out of spec voltage fluctuations or low voltage levels can easily be the source of a variety of hardware problems, even memory errors. Maybe ESPECIALLY memory errors, since memory is particularly dependent on stable voltage, in sufficient quantity, to remain stable.

It could certainly be memory related though so I'd run all 11 tests (Free version skips 2 tests between 1 and 13) for 4 passes of all 11, in Memtest, to ensure there are no memory physical or configuration problems. If you pass all four passes, and this will take several hours to complete, then we can move on from there.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.

Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86 (NOT Memtest86+, that is a different, older version and is outdated). Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 
Reactions: TJ Hooker

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