PC Build for Architecture - 3D modelling, rendering, and graphic design with 1400$ budget

Jan 30, 2019
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Hi, so I need help with building a new PC for 3d modelling preferably under 1400$. I'll be using software such as AutoCAD, Revit, sketch-up with V-ray, Lumion, photoshop, and adobe premiere for a little bit of video editing. I was using a laptop when studying, and now that I'm getting into graduation next year, so I want to build a work-ready PC. any help is appreciated.

I was thinking of getting an i7 8700K, but I don't know how to choose the GPU, get the gtx or quadro? does it matter? I'm fine with not gaming if I can save money.

Also, what about AMD? is Ryzen 7 any better? should I wait for Ryzen 3000 series? the latest post about this kind of build is last year, so I'm hoping for a more recent build. Maybe an i7 9700k is better? I need help.
 

nuttynut

Commendable
Jun 7, 2016
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This should be a good build for you. I chose the Ryzen 7 2700 because the *700 chips are basically identical to the higher models with a lower TDP (Thermal Design Power). It also costs at least $100 less than the i7-8700k.

As for the GPU, the RTX 2060 surprisingly seems to offer a good price-to-performance ratio.

Now are you planning to assemble it yourself or hire a tech?

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor ($259.89 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg Business)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($93.88 @ OutletPC)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($109.99 @ Newegg Business)
Storage: Crucial - P1 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($74.89 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate - Constellation ES.3 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($41.50 @ Amazon)
Case: Phanteks - ECLIPSE P400S TEMPERED GLASS ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair - CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($98.89 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: ViewSonic - VA2719-2K-SMHD 27.0" 2560x1440 60 Hz Monitor ($202.99 @ Newegg Business)
Other: ZOTAC NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 ($348.99)
Total: $1395.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-30 11:10 EST-0500
 
Jan 30, 2019
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Well, I'm planning to build it myself. Although this is going to be my first time building a PC. Do you recommend hiring a tech instead?

I'm not going to be building this PC right now, so the price may change in the near future, but I'll try and follow your guidelines and look for the same or lower priced parts.

Also, why not the 2700x? will I need to spend more on the PSU and the cooler if so? the price difference is only around 50$ right? I think I can manage 50$ more

and about the RTX 2060 6GB, is it better than the GTX 1070 8 GB? programs like lumion are hungry for VRAM, and the future of GPU Rendering is quite promising. So, is it still better to get the RTX 2060?

anyways, thanks for helping me

 

nuttynut

Commendable
Jun 7, 2016
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I'm not going to tell you that you shouldn't build the PC yourself, but there is a lot of things to be aware of. My first time the computer had to go into the shop anyway, because I didn't seat the ATX12V power connector properly.

Waiting a bit is probably a good idea. Ryzen Matisse processors may be coming in Q1, and you'll be able to watch for deals to show up.

The Ryzen 7 2700 should offer about the same performance as the 2700X when overclocked. They are believed to share the same chip design but with different power and clocks. Of course it's up to you. In terms of cooling and power, the cooler has a TDP of 150W, which is more than adequate, and the PSU should run at less than 50% of its rated capacity.
 
Jan 30, 2019
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Alright, I've decided to wait till mid 2019, I'll decide by then. Also, I'll probably hire a tech just so I don't brick any of the parts. Thanks for your advice!
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator


Don't buy a Hyper 212 for a Ryzen 2700, the AMD stock cooler is better than that. If you want something else buy something like a Cyrorig H5/H7 or a low end Noctua. But the Hyper 212 is very old and isn't really suited for modern CPUs.

The Ryzen 7 2700 should offer about the same performance as the 2700X when overclocked. They are believed to share the same chip design but with different power and clocks. Of course it's up to you. In terms of cooling and power, the cooler has a TDP of 150W, which is more than adequate, and the PSU should run at less than 50% of its rated capacity.
They're exactly the same CPU but with different clocks. It mainly has to do with the manufacturing and testing process what CPUs get what bin designations.
 

nuttynut

Commendable
Jun 7, 2016
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Yes, that is an old cooler, but I didn't list a Hyper 212. It was the updated Black Edition.



Yes, they are most likely binned differently. I think I got my information from Reddit, so ehh...
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator


Even still, the Hyper 212 was good in its' heyday when CPUs like the 3570K were soldered but now that they use TIM such as the 9700K, the Hyper 212 is almost kind of irrelevant to today's CPUs. They need much beefier cooling solutions than what we were used to in the past, which is why CLLs and full custom liquid loops are becoming much more common than they used to be.

Yes, they are most likely binned differently. I think I got my information from Reddit, so ehh...
Yeah I'd probably question that source. :lol:

My knowledge of the CPU manufacturing process at least is that all CPUs are designed to perform at the highest level. Then in the testing process, say if two cores fail then the CPU gets binned at one rate. Then if cores and threads fail in a second testing process, they get binned at a different rate, and so on and so forth. That's why you get a variety of different CPU designations, speeds, and so on.
 

nuttynut

Commendable
Jun 7, 2016
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Just like to point out that both Ryzen CPUs and the 9700K are soldered. But fine, it's still small for a tower HSF, and there are better options.
 

g-unit1111

Titan
Moderator


I had to look this one up but yes you are right. I thought the 9000 series were TIM but maybe that's just the X299 CPUs for now.
 

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