[SOLVED] PC build for gaming with old hardware pairing with new.

Escap3

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Oct 2, 2014
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Greetings guys.I want to build a budget pc for gaming and i want opinions.I want to keep the gpu from my current setup and possibly the 550w psu if i cant still use it with a future gpu and ram.Im thinking of a ryzen 5 3600 for cpu,a 16gb ram,new mobo obvioysly,cooling if needed and a new case.My budget for this pc build is around 500-600 without the psu and gpu.The current setup is the following.I want the new cpu to pair nice with the gpu that i have,but also pair with the future gpu, for example an 2060.
Operating System
Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
CPU
AMD FX-6300 43 °C
Vishera 32nm Technology
RAM
8.00GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 669MHz (9-9-9-24)
Motherboard
Gigabyte Technology Co. Ltd. 970A-UD3P (CPU 1) 34 °C
Graphics
VE248 (1920x1080@59Hz)
2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB (Undefined) 36 °C
Storage
465GB Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500GB (SSD) 40 °C
Optical Drives
No optical disk drives detected
Audio
High Definition Audio Device
 
You avoid low quality PSU because they are made of pretty garbage parts, and have more probability of going bad than good quality units. Beside giving performance issues and noise, sometimes when they go out they tend to take other parts in the build along with them. Some of them are literally house fire in waiting. This should give you an idea of the PSU quality hierarchy but you should use it only as a loose reference and not a strict adherence. The wiser thing to do is go through multiple reviews of each unit to make an accurate assessment...
https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40/

Now coming to the build itself, this should be pretty good and last you for a long long time...

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor | $296.47 @ Amazon
Motherboard | MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard | $114.99 @ B&H
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory | $84.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply | BitFenix Formula Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply | $89.90 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $586.35
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-08 18:58 EDT-0400 |

Just add your current SSD, GPU and case to it.


something like a Corsair CX 600 would be a good choice and shouldn't be too expensive.
Thats the older low quality green label unit. The newer and better version is the 650w white label unit.
 
Last edited:
Greetings guys.I want to build a budget pc for gaming and i want opinions.I want to keep the gpu from my current setup and possibly the 550w psu if i cant still use it with a future gpu and ram.Im thinking of a ryzen 5 3600 for cpu,a 16gb ram,new mobo obvioysly,cooling if needed and a new case.My budget for this pc build is around 500-600 without the psu and gpu.The current setup is the following.I want the new cpu to pair nice with the gpu that i have,but also pair with the future gpu, for example an 2060.
Operating System
Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
CPU
AMD FX-6300 43 °C
Vishera 32nm Technology
RAM
8.00GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 669MHz (9-9-9-24)
Motherboard
Gigabyte Technology Co. Ltd. 970A-UD3P (CPU 1) 34 °C
Graphics
VE248 (1920x1080@59Hz)
2047MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB (Undefined) 36 °C
Storage
465GB Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500GB (SSD) 40 °C
Optical Drives
No optical disk drives detected
Audio
High Definition Audio Device
That sounds like a sensible idea.... with regards your power supply what is the unit exactly? 550W should be enough for the parts you've listed but does depend on the quality of the supply (especially as I'm guessing it's a few years old). If it's a good quality unit (e.g. has 80+ gold certification) then it's probably ok but if it's a budget unit I'd suggest changing it just to be safe (don't want to kill all those new parts if it fails).

CPU wise, R5 3600 is a solid option and should be fine with pretty any gpu you want to throw in when you upgrade.

Motherboard - I'd suggest looking for a good quality b450 'max' board (the models with 'max' at the end of the name have Ryzen 3000 series support out of the box). The MSI B450 Tomahawk Max is a strong choice as it has a good set of expansion options and a good quality VRM that can handle any of the Ryzen 3000 cpu's (including the high core count 12 and 16 core parts, which would be nice if you ever want to upgrade in future).

A 2 x 8gb kit of DDR4 3200 memory should be fine for ram (you can run faster kits with Ryzen 3000 but the performance benefits are really small so not worth paying extra for imo - you can get a bigger boost by fine tuning a 3200 kit instead).

I think for your budget you can probably squeeze in a PSU as well (the SSD should be fine to move over as well).
 
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Escap3

Honorable
Oct 2, 2014
71
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10,630
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That sounds like a sensible idea.... with regards your power supply what is the unit exactly? 550W should be enough for the parts you've listed but does depend on the quality of the supply (especially as I'm guessing it's a few years old). If it's a good quality unit (e.g. has 80+ gold certification) then it's probably ok but if it's a budget unit I'd suggest changing it just to be safe (don't want to kill all those new parts if it fails).

CPU wise, R5 3600 is a solid option and should be fine with pretty any gpu you want to throw in when you upgrade.

Motherboard - I'd suggest looking for a good quality b450 'max' board (the models with 'max' at the end of the name have Ryzen 3000 series support out of the box). The MSI B450 Tomahawk Max is a strong choice as it has a good set of expansion options and a good quality VRM that can handle any of the Ryzen 3000 cpu's (including the high core count 12 and 16 core parts, which would be nice if you ever want to upgrade in future).

A 2 x 8gb kit of DDR4 3200 memory should be fine for ram (you can run faster kits with Ryzen 3000 but the performance benefits are really small so not worth paying extra for imo - you can get a bigger boost by fine tuning a 3200 kit instead).

I think for your budget you can probably squeeze in a PSU as well (the SSD should be fine to move over as well).
The psu is the following https://www.skroutz.gr/s/13923066/Corsair-VS-Series-VS550-White.html .Also i wanted to ask you if the 3600 is enough or should i go for higher,and also if the i5 9600 is a good choice.Also can you suggets some rgb hardware?
 
The psu is the following https://www.skroutz.gr/s/13923066/Corsair-VS-Series-VS550-White.html .Also i wanted to ask you if the 3600 is enough or should i go for higher,and also if the i5 9600 is a good choice.Also can you suggets some rgb hardware?
Yeah the Corsair VS series are pretty low quality units, and with it being a few years old, I would look at a new PSU.

The newer Corsair CX (2017 model) are decent, something like a Corsair CX 600 would be a good choice and shouldn't be too expensive.

CPU wise, the 3600 is a really good option, you aren't going to gain much going beyond that. I would go with the Ryzen 5 over the 9600 as the latter is only 6 threads (vs 12 on the 3600) so whilst the 9600 is good for gaming now, I think it may start to become limited soon (4 core 4 thread i5's are really struggling these days). There are already a few games where a 9600 performance drops a lot due to this (e.g. AC Origins).

As for RGB, I really don't go in for that (if anything I avoid it where possible) so not the best person to ask.
 

Escap3

Honorable
Oct 2, 2014
71
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Yeah the Corsair VS series are pretty low quality units, and with it being a few years old, I would look at a new PSU.

The newer Corsair CX (2017 model) are decent, something like a Corsair CX 600 would be a good choice and shouldn't be too expensive.

CPU wise, the 3600 is a really good option, you aren't going to gain much going beyond that. I would go with the Ryzen 5 over the 9600 as the latter is only 6 threads (vs 12 on the 3600) so whilst the 9600 is good for gaming now, I think it may start to become limited soon (4 core 4 thread i5's are really struggling these days). There are already a few games where a 9600 performance drops a lot due to this (e.g. AC Origins).

As for RGB, I really don't go in for that (if anything I avoid it where possible) so not the best person to ask.
I'm interested to know the reason you avoid them. :p
 
You avoid low quality PSU because they are made of pretty garbage parts, and have more probability of going bad than good quality units. Beside giving performance issues and noise, sometimes when they go out they tend to take other parts in the build along with them. Some of them are literally house fire in waiting. This should give you an idea of the PSU quality hierarchy but you should use it only as a loose reference and not a strict adherence. The wiser thing to do is go through multiple reviews of each unit to make an accurate assessment...
https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40/

Now coming to the build itself, this should be pretty good and last you for a long long time...

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor | $296.47 @ Amazon
Motherboard | MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard | $114.99 @ B&H
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory | $84.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply | BitFenix Formula Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply | $89.90 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $586.35
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-08 18:58 EDT-0400 |

Just add your current SSD, GPU and case to it.


something like a Corsair CX 600 would be a good choice and shouldn't be too expensive.
Thats the older low quality green label unit. The newer and better version is the 650w white label unit.
 
Last edited:

Escap3

Honorable
Oct 2, 2014
71
0
10,630
0
You avoid low quality PSU because they are made of pretty garbage parts, and have more probability of going bad than good quality units. Beside giving performance issues and noise, sometimes when they go out they tend to take other parts in the build along with them. Some of them are literally house fire in waiting. This should give you an idea of the PSU quality hierarchy but you should use it only as a loose reference and not a strict adherence. The wiser thing to do is go through multiple reviews of each unit to make an accurate assessment...
https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40/

Now coming to the build itself, this should be pretty good and last you for a long long time...

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor | $296.47 @ Amazon
Motherboard | MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard | $114.99 @ B&H
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory | $84.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply | BitFenix Formula Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply | $89.90 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $586.35
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-08 18:58 EDT-0400 |

Just add your current SSD, GPU and case to it.



Thats the older low quality green label unit. The newer and better version is the 650w white label unit.
I ment the RGBs not the psu when i said why avoid them but thanks anyway !
 

Escap3

Honorable
Oct 2, 2014
71
0
10,630
0
You avoid low quality PSU because they are made of pretty garbage parts, and have more probability of going bad than good quality units. Beside giving performance issues and noise, sometimes when they go out they tend to take other parts in the build along with them. Some of them are literally house fire in waiting. This should give you an idea of the PSU quality hierarchy but you should use it only as a loose reference and not a strict adherence. The wiser thing to do is go through multiple reviews of each unit to make an accurate assessment...
https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1116640-psu-tier-list-40/

Now coming to the build itself, this should be pretty good and last you for a long long time...

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor | $296.47 @ Amazon
Motherboard | MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard | $114.99 @ B&H
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory | $84.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply | BitFenix Formula Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply | $89.90 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $586.35
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-08 18:58 EDT-0400 |

Just add your current SSD, GPU and case to it.



Thats the older low quality green label unit. The newer and better version is the 650w white label unit.
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSe31NVntzc&t=434s
Hey man,cause of this video i need to ask you why you suggest the 3700x because i dont really see a big difference that can justify the price increase.
 
I'm interested to know the reason you avoid them. :p
Just personal preference - I've never really understood the attraction of RGB on a desktop PC - doesn't matter if I'm working or gaming on the machine, my focus is on the software I'm running rather than admiring the machine itself.

I mean a back light on a keyboard is nice as it makes the keys easier to see in low light, that serves a purpose.... but I'd rather get better components for the machine itself with no lighting that pay for a lower quality component that has lights on it.... it doesn't serve any practical purpose to my mind. Nothing against anyone who does like RGB lighting though - some of the high end builds done with full RGB and a hard tube open loop look stunning - but those are all top spec rigs that already have the best of everything installed (and are usually sponsored).
 
I ment the RGBs not the psu when i said why avoid them but thanks anyway !
Beside drawing more power and producing more heat, RGB does not even contribute in any way to performance. The charm only remains for so long, and when it plays up its a seperate headache. If you ask me its a complete waste of money but that's just me.

Hey man,cause of this video i need to ask you why you suggest the 3700x because i dont really see a big difference that can justify the price increase.
The difference is in the larger core and thread count which should give better performance in more CPU intensive titles like Civilisations and GTA5 and will last longer down the line when in future games 6 cores might fall short for supporting better cards or more CPU demanding games couple of years down the line.
 

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