[SOLVED] PC Building Advice

Jul 16, 2022
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So i've finally decided to build a computer of my own and with a budget of 2k and a bit of research, I picked a few parts and was wondering if I could get some advice on a few things. Like; reliability of parts, recommendation of replacements, if problems would arise, etc. Here is my build:
https://pcpartpicker.com/list/b8pWJM

My original design had the MSI MAG Core Liquid 360R V2 AIO Liquid CPU Cooler, but that option wasn't in part picker. However I had also thought about down grading to a 240mm cooler unless more is better (still learning). Though I've had to return a custom computer before with a 360mm because the pc was softly vibrating whenever I entered any website and was thinking it was because of the cooler. The custom computer had most of these parts aside from the power supply and cooler on the list and it all seemed like a tight fit. Which goes into one of the compatibility issues on the list, but I think it should be fine. Any advice, changes, or thumbs up would be appreciated. Thank you!
 

geofelt

Titan
The 12700K is a good choice.
There is no difference in performance or efficiency between the12700K and the 12700KF.
You will pay some $25 less for the 12700KF and will not get the integrated graphics capability.
It is the same chip with the graphics disabled.
The i7-12700 is very similar, but the base and boost clocks are a bit lower.
Still very similar.
There is a spectrum of performance among all of the 12th gen processors.
There is no bad choice there.
You would be hard pressed to tell the difference in actual use between 12600K and 12700K or anything in between.

Your case is a good one for air cooling.
I do not much like liquid cooling when a good air cooler will do the job.
I will post a canned rant on that at the end.

If you like RGB then realize that you are paying extra for it.
This is the exact same speed and latency for $99:
https://www.newegg.com/corsair-32gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820236608?quicklink=true

You have three m.2 ssd drives.
Seems to me that you would be better off with a single 2tb m.2 ssd, at least to start with. It is much easier to manage a single C drive space.
You will not detect any difference between the 980 and 970 evo plus outside of synthetic benchmarks.

My canned rant on liquid cooling:
------------------------start of rant-------------------
You buy a liquid cooler to be able to extract an extra multiplier or two out of your OC. Or, to keep heat under control to get the best turbo boost out of your processor.

I do not much like all in one liquid coolers if a good air cooler like a Noctua, Phantex or bequiet can do the job just as well.

Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.

The orientation of the radiator is a catch 22 problem.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu best, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card, and motherboard voltage regulator coolers.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better), then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.

Past that, a AIO radiator complicates creating a positive pressure filtered cooling setup which can keep your parts clean.
The basic principle of positive pressure cooling is to have all air intake from one source and filtered.
Added fans, excepting perhaps a rear exhaust fan witll tend to draw in unfiltered air from adjacent openings.

The ultimate cooling ability of air or aio is the fin volume of the radiator which dissipates heat.
A 280 aio will have two 140mm fans, each in front of a radiator fin stack that is typically 30mm or so in thickness.
.
This is essentially the same size as the two fin stack on top air coolers like the Noctua NH-D15, Be Quiet drp 4 PRO Phanteks TC14pe and others.
The twin fin stack on a NH-D15, for example is about 40mm each.

AIO coolers do not last forever. The cooling tubes have some degree of permeability that lets air eventually enter the system requiring a cooler replacement. The pumps are mechanical devices which will eventually fail or get clogged. I do not worry about
fans for air or aio, they can be easily replaced.
But, should an aio pump fail, you can not keep running until you replace it.

If budget is an issue, a top air cooler will usually cost less than a 280 aio.

And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
Google for AIO leaks to see what can happen.
While unlikely, leaks do happen.
A AIO leak may be covered by warranty but a leak is a nasty problem to recover from.

Where is an aio a good fit?
If you are into maximum overclocking and can use a 360 or larger aio, then liquid is your only option. Custom liquid will be even better(and more expensive)
Another good place for an aio is
in a space restricted case where there is insufficient height available to mount a good air cooler.

If one puts looks over function, The RGB "bling available on aio coolers may direct your choice.
That is a personal thing; not for me though.
-----------------------end of rant--------------------------
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
MSI MAG Core Liquid 360R V2 AIO
I wouldn't invest in an AIO under MSI's branding. I'd rather go for something from Corsair, Lina-Li or Fractal.

Look towards a dal channel DDR4-3600Mhz ram kit. Get a smaller SSD for your OS and app's/launchers, the larger SSD can be for game library and the larger HDD can be for storage, assuming you're proposed build is for primarily gaming.
 

Why_Me

Champion
So i've finally decided to build a computer of my own and with a budget of 2k and a bit of research, I picked a few parts and was wondering if I could get some advice on a few things. Like; reliability of parts, recommendation of replacements, if problems would arise, etc. Here is my build:
https://pcpartpicker.com/list/b8pWJM

My original design had the MSI MAG Core Liquid 360R V2 AIO Liquid CPU Cooler, but that option wasn't in part picker. However I had also thought about down grading to a 240mm cooler unless more is better (still learning). Though I've had to return a custom computer before with a 360mm because the pc was softly vibrating whenever I entered any website and was thinking it was because of the cooler. The custom computer had most of these parts aside from the power supply and cooler on the list and it all seemed like a tight fit. Which goes into one of the compatibility issues on the list, but I think it should be fine. Any advice, changes, or thumbs up would be appreciated. Thank you!
What is your monitor resolution? btw you want a set of two sticks of RAM so that it runs in dual channel.
 
Jul 16, 2022
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"I'd rather go for something from Corsair, Lina-Li or Fractal."
Would you say that 240 is more then enough for the cpu? Or is 360 safer given the specs? Cause Corsair is a bit pricy, although I completely agree its worth.

"Look towards a dal channel DDR4-3600Mhz ram kit."
Could you explain this? I dont know what this is.

"Get a smaller SSD for your OS and app's/launchers, the larger SSD can be for game library and the larger HDD can be for storage, assuming you're proposed build is for primarily gaming."
So your saying to get a third storage for the OS? Also yes, this is a gaming/streaming intended pc.
 
Jul 16, 2022
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What is your monitor resolution? btw you want a set of two sticks of RAM so that it runs in dual channel.
1920x1080. Is dual channel better? I havent done much research into that. I just figured down the road I could add another 32 stick in for more power.
 

Why_Me

Champion
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Jul 16, 2022
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Add your RTX 3060 Ti to this build and you have a gaming beast.

https://www.newegg.com/black-fractal-design-pop-mini-air-rgb-micro-atx-tower/p/N82E16811352164
Fractal Design Pop Mini Air RGB Black TG mATX High-Airflow Clear Tempered Glass Window Tower Computer Case $89.99

https://www.amazon.com/EVGA-Supernova-Modular-Warranty-220-G6-0750-X1/dp/B0998KZ8SP
EVGA SuperNOVA 750 G6 80+ Gold 750W Modular Power Supply $89.99

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09PXD16F6
MSI MAG B660M MORTAR WIFI DDR4 $159.99

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09NPJDPVG
Intel Core i7-12700F $312.96

https://www.amazon.com/DeepCool-AK620-High-Performance-Dual-Tower-Dissipation/dp/B09CSXS3X4
DeepCool AK620 CPU Cooler $64.99

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07ZPLM1R1
Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3600 32GB (2x16GB) CL18 $102.99

https://www.amazon.com/PNY-CS2130-Internal-Solid-State/dp/B0869C35V2/
PNY CS2130 2TB M.2 PCIe NVMe Gen3 x4 Internal SSD $174.99
Is there any particular reasoning for replacing the parts I chose for these parts? I understand the change for the ram sticks, but was there anything in particular that wasn't worth it over these?
 

geofelt

Titan
For gaming, you want a reasonable balance between cpu and gpu.
Do you have a budget?
What kinds of games do play?
For fast action games, budget more for the graphics card.
For cpu centric games, look for strong single thread performance of the cpu.
For multiplayer games, look for a good number of processing threads.
Most games will not effectively use more than 4-6 threads.
12700K with 20 threads is a fine processor.
But a I5-12600K with 16 threads has about the same single thread cpu capability.
Here is a review:
https://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/core_i5_12600k_processor_review,21.html
Neither cpu requires a 360 class aio cooling.
Most gamers do not overclock, but let the normal turbo mechanism boost a couple of cores past what an all core overclock can do.
Noctua maintains a suitability list for their air coolers.
Here is the list for the 12700K:
https://ncc.noctua.at/cpus/model/Intel-Core-i7-12700K-1579
NH-D15s is a very good cooler.
It will be quieter, more reliable, and will cool as well as a 280 aio.
And... it will never leak.

I have no opinion on motherboards, but some asus boards have attached cooling shrouds that impact some coolers.
Z690 is fine, but B660 will really do as well, and the MATX size is usually much cheaper.
Today, there is no real difference in performance between DDR4 and DDR4 systems, DDR4 being cheaper.
3600 speed in a 2 x 16gb kit would be the way to go.

Love the samsung ssd.
For bulk storage, 5400rpm is ok, But if you plan on putting games on it, get a 7200 rpm drive.
Better, yet, Make that 1tb m.2 ssd a 2tb size and defer on a HDD until you actually need more storage.

The case will work. I like 140mm fans for the front intakes. 140mm moves more air quietly than 120mm fans.

Good pick on the psu. plenty of power and a quality unit.

For a first time builder:

MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a long #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
A small led flashlight is also useful.

I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch--12-119-009--Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

  1. Install windows.
  2. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
  4. Opinions vary on updating the bios. On a new build, I will update to currency right away. My thought is that I have no big loss if
I encounter a problem. Use the usb option, not the windows option.
 

Why_Me

Champion
Is there any particular reasoning for replacing the parts I chose for these parts? I understand the change for the ram sticks, but was there anything in particular that wasn't worth it over these?
Cost + performance. The 12700F uses less power and creates less heat than the 12700K/ KF not to mention it cost less, yet it runs neck and neck with those cpu's hence the gaming benchmarks I posted. The Fractal case has much better airflow with its mesh front panel, that set of Corsair RAM is low profile 3600mhz and that cpu cooler has gotten nothing but good reviews across the net as has that PNY SSD.

 

Why_Me

Champion
Full size B660 ATX board to pair up with an i7 12700 / 12700F and a case with much better airflow than that MSI case you have in your build.

https://www.amazon.com/MSI-MAG-B660-DDR4-Motherboard/dp/B09PXL3ZZB
MSI MAG B660 TOMAHAWK WIFI DDR4 $189.99

https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/MAG-B660-TOMAHAWK-WIFI-DDR4

https://www.newegg.com/black-fractal-design-pop-air-atx-mid-tower/p/N82E16811352168
Fractal Design Pop Air Black TG ATX High-Airflow Clear Tempered Glass Window Mid Tower Computer Case $79.99

 
Jul 16, 2022
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Apologies for the delay in response, but I was really debating options from what everyone was suggesting. So far this is my updated list for the computer:
https://pcpartpicker.com/list/bPYBzf
I'm a little overbudget.

I'm debating the Intel i7-12700k versus the F version as suggested. I put them through a comparison website and both seem to have pros and cons in comparison. One being cheaper and less consuming, while the other is a bit more efficient. When it comes to understanding the advantages of either (let alone the multiple other versions) I honestly find myself just staring at the screen. Apologies if it seems obvious to you, but I'm just trying to understand it myself. I might go with the F model, but the integrated graphics thing worries me, I'll need a bit more research on my end.
https://versus.com/en/intel-core-i7-12700f-vs-intel-core-i7-12700k

Then there's the motherboard. Now considering my past experiences with motherboards short circuiting on me, I'm extremely paranoid and don't really wanna settle for 'less' on this. I also took the suggestion of the B660 model versus the Z690 model. The Z690 seems superior with more ports and audio(?) quality, not sure why its better audio. I think this just comes down to reviews at this point, but I need one that will last. There's so many niche details to compare with motherboards, its honestly overwhelming to compare.
https://versus.com/en/asus-rog-strix-b660-a-gaming-wifi-vs-asus-rog-strix-z690-a-gaming-wifi

I also swapped out the HHD storage for a second 1TB SSD. The 2TB one is pretty expensive, so its either I ignore the suggestion of a third storage and just have a 500GB+2TB SSD or just get what I have listed. Though I'm still thinking of keeping the 500GB SSD + 1TB SSD + 2TB HHD setup. Then there is also the swapping of memory and cooling for the corsair models. I dont have experience with the air fan models that were suggested, but I assume liquid coolers manage heat flow better. I read that air coolers distribute the heat into the case, which given my room could make things worse for it.

Aside from my mental debate of the motherboard, storage and cpu, let me know if everything else looks alright to you guys. There were other suggestions, but I just wasn't keen or to sure about them when looking at the comparisons for the others I found. If I'm wrong feel free to yell at me. I super appreciate the advice so far, its helping me learn.
 
Jul 16, 2022
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For a first time builder:
MY build process:

Before anything, while waiting for your parts to be delivered, download
and read, cover to cover your case and motherboard manual.
Buy a long #2 magnetic tip philips screwdriver.
A small led flashlight is also useful.

I find it handy to buy a power switch like this for testing.
https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16812119009?Description=power switch&cm_re=power_switch--12-119-009--Product&quicklink=true
1. I assemble the critical parts outside of the case.
That lets me test them for functionality easily.
A wood table or cardboard is fine.
2. Plug in only the necessary parts at first. Ram, cpu, cooler, psu.
Do not force anything. Parts fit only one way.
Attach a monitor to the integrated motherboard adapter if you have one, otherwise to the graphics card.
  1. If your motherboard does not have a PWR button, momentarily touch the two pwr front panel pins with a flat blade screwdriver.
  2. Repeatedly hit F2 or DEL, and that should get you into the bios display.
  3. Boot from a cd or usb stick with memtest86 on it. memtest will exercise your ram and cpu functionality.
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

  1. Install windows.
  2. Install the motherboard cd drivers. Particularly the lan drivers so you can access the internet.
Do not select the easy install option, or you will get a bunch of utilities and trialware that you don't want. Drivers only.
  1. Connect to the internet and install an antivirus program. Microsoft defender is free, easy, and unobtrusive.
  2. Install your graphics card and driver if you tested with integrated graphics.
You will need to remove the graphics card later to install your motherboard in the case.
As a tip when screwing the motherboard into the posts, give the screw a small counterclockwise turn until you feel a click.
That lets you know that the screw will engage properly.
Make a note of how the graphics card latches into the pcie slot.
The mechanism will be hidden under the card and may be difficult to work if you have not previously checked how.
  1. Update windows to currency.
  2. Only now do I take apart what I need to and install it in the case.
  3. Now is the time to reinstall your graphics card.
  4. Opinions vary on updating the bios. On a new build, I will update to currency right away. My thought is that I have no big loss if
I encounter a problem. Use the usb option, not the windows option.
I appreciate your steps on putting the computer together. They will come in handy for starting. If you have more tips feel free to shoot them at me.
As for the computer, it is with a 2k$ budget in mind for gaming (high end games, from fast paced to mulitplayer) and streaming. I'm not certain I trust air coolers, but do liquid coolers leak often? From your comment earlier, I assume you had it happen a fair share of times.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i7-12700F 2.1 GHz 12-Core Processor ($312.96 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Liquid Freezer II 240 56.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($102.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus TUF GAMING B660M-PLUS WIFI D4 Micro ATX LGA1700 Motherboard ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB RT 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 CL16 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo Plus 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($72.48 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 980 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($95.10 @ MemoryC)
Storage: Samsung 980 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($95.10 @ MemoryC)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce RTX 3060 Ti LHR 8 GB GAMING OC Rev 2.0 Video Card ($499.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cougar Gemini S ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA P5 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ EVGA)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home 32/64-bit ($139.00 @ B&H)
Total: $1792.58
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-08-07 14:51 EDT-0400


You are going way over budget based solely on some RGB lighting and the possibility of overclocking, which on a 12th Gen intel is absolutely unnecessary. The above uses faster ram, an equitable motherboard, 12700F instead of K and a more appropriate psu that's better yet cheaper than your choice.

There's no point in overspending on something that's really now just a gimmick, as in OC.
 

geofelt

Titan
The 12700K is a good choice.
There is no difference in performance or efficiency between the12700K and the 12700KF.
You will pay some $25 less for the 12700KF and will not get the integrated graphics capability.
It is the same chip with the graphics disabled.
The i7-12700 is very similar, but the base and boost clocks are a bit lower.
Still very similar.
There is a spectrum of performance among all of the 12th gen processors.
There is no bad choice there.
You would be hard pressed to tell the difference in actual use between 12600K and 12700K or anything in between.

Your case is a good one for air cooling.
I do not much like liquid cooling when a good air cooler will do the job.
I will post a canned rant on that at the end.

If you like RGB then realize that you are paying extra for it.
This is the exact same speed and latency for $99:
https://www.newegg.com/corsair-32gb-288-pin-ddr4-sdram/p/N82E16820236608?quicklink=true

You have three m.2 ssd drives.
Seems to me that you would be better off with a single 2tb m.2 ssd, at least to start with. It is much easier to manage a single C drive space.
You will not detect any difference between the 980 and 970 evo plus outside of synthetic benchmarks.

My canned rant on liquid cooling:
------------------------start of rant-------------------
You buy a liquid cooler to be able to extract an extra multiplier or two out of your OC. Or, to keep heat under control to get the best turbo boost out of your processor.

I do not much like all in one liquid coolers if a good air cooler like a Noctua, Phantex or bequiet can do the job just as well.

Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.

The orientation of the radiator is a catch 22 problem.
If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu best, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card, and motherboard voltage regulator coolers.
If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better), then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.

Past that, a AIO radiator complicates creating a positive pressure filtered cooling setup which can keep your parts clean.
The basic principle of positive pressure cooling is to have all air intake from one source and filtered.
Added fans, excepting perhaps a rear exhaust fan witll tend to draw in unfiltered air from adjacent openings.

The ultimate cooling ability of air or aio is the fin volume of the radiator which dissipates heat.
A 280 aio will have two 140mm fans, each in front of a radiator fin stack that is typically 30mm or so in thickness.
.
This is essentially the same size as the two fin stack on top air coolers like the Noctua NH-D15, Be Quiet drp 4 PRO Phanteks TC14pe and others.
The twin fin stack on a NH-D15, for example is about 40mm each.

AIO coolers do not last forever. The cooling tubes have some degree of permeability that lets air eventually enter the system requiring a cooler replacement. The pumps are mechanical devices which will eventually fail or get clogged. I do not worry about
fans for air or aio, they can be easily replaced.
But, should an aio pump fail, you can not keep running until you replace it.

If budget is an issue, a top air cooler will usually cost less than a 280 aio.

And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
Google for AIO leaks to see what can happen.
While unlikely, leaks do happen.
A AIO leak may be covered by warranty but a leak is a nasty problem to recover from.

Where is an aio a good fit?
If you are into maximum overclocking and can use a 360 or larger aio, then liquid is your only option. Custom liquid will be even better(and more expensive)
Another good place for an aio is
in a space restricted case where there is insufficient height available to mount a good air cooler.

If one puts looks over function, The RGB "bling available on aio coolers may direct your choice.
That is a personal thing; not for me though.
-----------------------end of rant--------------------------
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Geo isn't quite right on several aspects of his rant. But he's an air lover, while I prefer liquid.

Efficiency and capacity are 2 different things. Efficiency is the match between what the fan can do vs what the heatsink does.

Capacity is how much wattage a heat exchanger can reasonably handle. A 240mm AIO has more fin surface area than the largest aircoolers, but some (like the Noctua NH-D15) have better efficiency, so as a result they average roughly the same capacity and temps. A NH-D15 cannot equal a 280mm rads sheer surface area, and as a result, it's capacity.

In general, most ppl who buy a new pc buy a completely new PC, new cooler included, so after 5-8 years expected lifespan of an aio, replacing it becomes basically a moot point. There's very few ppl that are still using their old Noctua NH-D14 from 20 years ago. Not when replacement fans are $20-$30 each, there's 2x of them and they've upgraded to a newer and more efficient cpu that doesn't require monster air.

Everything has s failure rate if made by man. Yes, aios can leak, mostly because of installer error, not factory quality control. I've had Noctua with leaking heat pipes, Phanteks with warped bases, I've changed multiple motherboards warped from oversized aircoolers.

If corsair sold 1 million aios in a year, with the average 0.1% failure rate, that's 1000 angry consumers. Out of those 1000, 90% was pump failure/DOA. The remaining 100 ppl had an actual leak, 90% caused when they twisted or bent the tubing and stressed the connectors. Leaving 10 ppl with outright tubing blowouts and full fledged leaks. Out of those 10 ppl, 1 person made a YouTube video, extolling the badness of aios and leaks, which went virul, and now 1 million ppl who have never used an aio know all about how bad they are and their leaking problems.

Says nothing about the 999,000 perfectly happy customers, the 990 who got a replacement/rma, the final 10 ppl contacted by Corsair and any damages covered, parts replaced.

Ppl don't make videos about their stuff working great, ppl make videos about the sensationalism of stuff going wrong.

Google-fu, most of the 'leak' videos you'll find are anywhere upto 20ish years old.

Rads orientation does Not heat up your parts, especially does not heat up the cpu or gpu. The workload of the component heats it up, cooling is after. A correctly sized radiator carries a coolant temp from ambient to @ 40°C. Doesn't matter if the cpu is 70°C, coolant will be @ 40°C. The only thing dumped into the case is any wattage given off by the cpu. If the cpu uses 250w, that's basically what the radiator is going to exchange, not the actual temp. A typical hairdryer is 1500w by comparison.
 
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I have zero idea how to understand most of what you both are talking about for the Air vs Liquid cooler topic. You gentlemen need to remember I'm still learning about computer parts and I've never installed a cooler before, so I cant really picture the orientation your referring to for air intake or outtake directions.

Also as a note, its not my intention to focus on overclocking, nor am I choosing parts just cause they have RGB. I'm picking the parts I see that relate to what I assumed were good parts for the cost and what I wanted for the specs. I didn't know the other corsair memory sticks were the same, just not RGB. I swapped over to them now. Judging on everyone else's opinion, I have also swapped over to the F model processor. Though I'm not sure about the integrated graphics of the K model. I found that many people say its something that just complicates gaming and drive installation, while others say its a good thing to have now.

The three storages were a choice from the first comment recommending to use a smaller ssd storage for the OS and a second for the games and other apps. The third was originally the HHD for pics and other bulk storage which I swapped to another SSD for the sake of convenience. I could just combine the two 1TB cards into the 2tb card if I can find one of decent price. Though they seem to equal the same, just reduce drive numbers. So it will be a 500gb SSD for the OS and then a 2TB SSD for everything else.

I'm still debating the motherboard options recommended. The one Kara mentioned is interesting when I put them in a comparison website with my original choice, but I'm still not sold on it. I've had to many bad experiences with motherboards and I don't want to take any chances. I would love cheaper, but I don't predict any upgrades for a long time so I need these parts to last and stay current. The EVGA power supply (while stated in the comment is 80$, is shown was as 110$ in the link) is not much cheaper and Corsair is a name brand I'm willing to trust.

At this point I just need to settle on a motherboard, find out a bit more about integrated graphics (to feel more secure on the intel F model choice) and then maybe give a little more thought on the Air vs Liquid cooler debate. I feel like it just comes down to liquid coolers being more efficient, but fan coolers have a lower risk to them (as in, if a liquid cooler breaks then way more problems will come of it). If worse comes to worse I'll just fall back on the Corsair liquid cooler. I appreciate all of your feedback so far. I'm almost finished deciding on parts and this has been a ton of help so far from when we first started. I just need a tiny bit more push on these last few details.
 

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