[SOLVED] PC Constant Restarts (NO BSOD)

Nov 30, 2022
5
0
10
0
Hey, for the last few weeks my PC will randomly just restart, almost every day. I'm hoping someone can help explain this to me. I've included some details below:
Please help because this is impacting almost everything I do. These random reboots are incredibly annoying. I looked on other forums and found some suggestions but I'm not sure if they are having the same problem as me and dont want to mess around with settings if I don't need to.
Example 1: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/whea-logger-event-19-a-corrected-hardware-error-has-occurred.3680745/
Example 2: https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/all/solved-false-kernel-power-event-id-41-63-reported/58170773-6dde-4c00-9bbe-dd8af77d5445
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Motherboard BIOS can cause ALL issues. ALL. Because nothing works, at ALL, without the instructions in the BIOS CORRECTLY telling the operating system what to do and how to do it and what all the involved parameters are. Anything that is a part of that which is "off" or not right, or buggy, or simply not in there because the hardware is newer than the microcode version in the BIOS is so that it lacks having the correct information to run a device properly, will cause problems.

This is WHY there are BIOS updates. BIOS updating these days is almost as common and almost as necessary, almost as frequently, as driver updates are, because there are so many different types of hardware these days and so many differences in what they need to function correctly, or in some cases, at all.

If you are not comfortable with doing a BIOS update, or a hard reset, or changing BIOS settings, then you should take your system to a shop or to somebody who isn't uncomfortable with it. It's really as simple as that. Some problems can't be fixed by, just wanting them fixed. They require actual effort and specific steps to resolve them and if you are unable or unwilling to do what is needed then you are simply going to still have the same problems and sometimes you don't don't WHICH specific steps or recommendations are going to fix the problem until after you have tried them.

For the record, this is how you do a hard reset of the BIOS.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the BIOS to fully reset and force recreation of the hardware tables.
 
Reactions: Roland Of Gilead

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Please list your FULL hardware specifications including EXACT model numbers of all core hardware including PSU, motherboard, CPU, memory kit (Or, sigh, kits, if more than one memory kit is installed regardless of whether it's the same model or not), graphics card, CPU cooler and current motherboard BIOS version.
 
Nov 30, 2022
5
0
10
0
Please list your FULL hardware specifications including EXACT model numbers of all core hardware including PSU, motherboard, CPU, memory kit (Or, sigh, kits, if more than one memory kit is installed regardless of whether it's the same model or not), graphics card, CPU cooler and current motherboard BIOS version.

OS: Windows 10 Pro Version 10.0.19045 Build 19045
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 5800x (using ryzen master)
Motherboard: MSI MAG X570 Tomahawk WIFI (MS-7C84) BIOS Version/Date: 1.40, 2020-10-29
RAM: G.Skill TridentZ Neo DDR4-3600 16GBx2 (please note that I have replaced this with a brand new version of the exact same RAM and the same issue persists)
PSU: Corsair HX850 Platinum 850 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply
Cooler: NZXT Kraken X73 73.11 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler
Graphics: Gigabyte AORUS RTX 3080 10GB
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Before you do much else, you really need to update to BIOS version 7C84v1B for your board and after you do that it would be advisable to do a hard reset of the BIOS, THEN go into the BIOS and load the default or optimal default settings AND then save settings, exit, restart, back into BIOS, reconfigure any required custom settings, save, exit, see how it does.
 
Nov 30, 2022
5
0
10
0
Before you do much else, you really need to update to BIOS version 7C84v1B for your board and after you do that it would be advisable to do a hard reset of the BIOS, THEN go into the BIOS and load the default or optimal default settings AND then save settings, exit, restart, back into BIOS, reconfigure any required custom settings, save, exit, see how it does.
I dont understand. Why would my mobo bios be causing this issue? I dont know how to do a "hard reset" of bios and why would I do that after updating it? I don't touch any settings in bios for anything because I am not experienced.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Motherboard BIOS can cause ALL issues. ALL. Because nothing works, at ALL, without the instructions in the BIOS CORRECTLY telling the operating system what to do and how to do it and what all the involved parameters are. Anything that is a part of that which is "off" or not right, or buggy, or simply not in there because the hardware is newer than the microcode version in the BIOS is so that it lacks having the correct information to run a device properly, will cause problems.

This is WHY there are BIOS updates. BIOS updating these days is almost as common and almost as necessary, almost as frequently, as driver updates are, because there are so many different types of hardware these days and so many differences in what they need to function correctly, or in some cases, at all.

If you are not comfortable with doing a BIOS update, or a hard reset, or changing BIOS settings, then you should take your system to a shop or to somebody who isn't uncomfortable with it. It's really as simple as that. Some problems can't be fixed by, just wanting them fixed. They require actual effort and specific steps to resolve them and if you are unable or unwilling to do what is needed then you are simply going to still have the same problems and sometimes you don't don't WHICH specific steps or recommendations are going to fix the problem until after you have tried them.

For the record, this is how you do a hard reset of the BIOS.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the BIOS to fully reset and force recreation of the hardware tables.
 
Reactions: Roland Of Gilead

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I don't think hard reset and clear CMOS are necessarily always the same thing or have the same result. I know they SHOULD be, but in reality, aren't. I have proven it time after time on my bench and in dozens and dozens of threads here where people have already "reset CMOS" by pressing the clear CMOS button, or moving the jumper, or simply taking the battery out and putting it back in without doing any of the other steps along with it like disconnecting from power or depleting the residual power by pressing the power button while it's disconnected from power and the CMOS battery is out. But yes, in most cases just clearing CMOS will get you where you want to be.

When it doesn't, going a little further MAY resolve the problem. Therefor I usually like to just go there from the start and cut out the middleman. LOL.
 
Reactions: Roland Of Gilead
Nov 30, 2022
5
0
10
0
Thank you. I have flash updated my bios. I did not perform a hard reset but if the issue persists I will take that step too.
 
Nov 30, 2022
5
0
10
0
So it lasted until today (over 5 days without it happening) but then this occurred again:

WHEA-Logger 18

A fatal hardware error has occurred.

Reported by component: Processor Core
Error Source: Machine Check Exception
Error Type: Cache Hierarchy Error
Processor APIC ID: 0

The details view of this entry contains further information.


Should I preform the hard reset you mentioned or is there anything else I could try? FYI I updated my bios, got all the drivers and also upgraded to Windows 11. Everything has been running smoothly for around 5 days until this sudden restart, again, just a simple restart but no BSOD.

Thanks again!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I would definitely TRY the hard reset of the BIOS. And also check again to see if there has been a newer BIOS or drivers release since then. Sometimes many updates occur rapidly because they find problems, so always worth looking. AND, if there are drivers you are not updating because you think "those don't matter", that is OFTEN the reason. There are NO drivers that don't matter. ALL drivers affect ALL OTHER drivers, so ALL of them need to be up to date when there are newer versions available.
 
Reactions: Roland Of Gilead

ASK THE COMMUNITY