[SOLVED] PC Crashes after trying to wake from sleep

Fer DLC

Commendable
Apr 29, 2017
77
0
1,630
0
I have had this issue for a while now but i do not know what may have caused it. Basically , when my pc goes to sleep and my monitor display turns off and i try waking up the pc, the monitor tries to show a display but says no display detected and then it turns off. The pc does seem to wake up since the power button LED turns on and stops flashing. Sometimes the pc crashes if i wait long enough (around 2 min) and i get a BSOD error. It doesn't always crash. Only way to get it back to windows is by doing a hard shutdown or reset. I have tried updating my bios, tweaking power settings in windows, and doing a clean install of windows but nothing has worked. My pc works perfectly fine ; the only problem is the crashing and failing to get a display after sleep mode. The specs for my pc are a ryzen 1500x, rx570 gpu, and a cx450 power supply from corsair. My clocks and voltages are stock. I am running windows 10. Any help is appreciated. Thank you
 

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
Your issue could be either with software or hardware. If issue is with hardware, your PSU is the culprit.

Some PSUs, especially older and/or lower build quality units doesn't support CPU C6/C7 sleep states. It manifests as BSoD or black screen on wake up.

Here, you have 2x choices:
  1. Disable C6/C7 sleep states within BIOS.
  2. Buy a new, better build quality PSU that does support CPU C6/C7 sleep states.
Personally, i'd go with better PSU (any Seasonic unit in 500W range would do, e.g Focus/Focus+ 550) [pcpp] since Corsair CX450, at best, is mediocre quality PSU. While it can be used just fine in an office PC that never sees any high loads; using CX-series in a gaming PC, where PSU does see high loads, is a bad idea. In a gaming PC, i wouldn't use anything below good quality PSU.

Note: if the issue is within software, new PSU doesn't fix your issue but it does keep your PC components safer for years to come. Since PSU powers everything, it is the most important component inside the PC. As far as how good build quality Corsair CX-450 has, all you need to do is to look at warranty given to it:
Corsair CX-450 - 5 years
Seasonic Focus 550 - 7 years
Seasonic Focus+ 550 - 10 years
Seasonic PRIME (all models) - 12 years

(All my 3 PCs: Skylake, Haswell and AMD are also powered by Seasonic. Full specs with pics in my sig.)
 

Fer DLC

Commendable
Apr 29, 2017
77
0
1,630
0
i think it definitely is a hardware problem, because i already tried reinstalling drivers and windows too. Thank you for your answer. i never heard of these c6/7 power states. Would disabling them affect anything at all with my pc? is there something i should be warned about? thanks again. I also now know which psus to look for. I was told corsair was good for psus
 
Corsair makes good quality and bad psus. Its hard to know what to look for. Corsairs vs line is horrible and the capacitors are prone to smokey failure, however psus like the corsair rmx line are very good.
I have a cx550m and have had no issues with it. The cx line is generally lower midrange and is fine for most systems, but it isnt as efficient nor as high quality as some more expensive power supplies.
Seasonic generally makes good power supplies across the lineup and its hard to go wrong with seasonic.
 

Aeacus

Illustrious
Herald
i think it definitely is a hardware problem, because i already tried reinstalling drivers and windows too. Thank you for your answer. i never heard of these c6/7 power states. Would disabling them affect anything at all with my pc? is there something i should be warned about? thanks again. I also now know which psus to look for. I was told corsair was good for psus
Disabling C6 and higher sleep states from BIOS is temporary and not a permanent fix. For permanent fix, you're looking towards new PSU since disabling higher sleep states can play a role in CPU's longevity.
CPU C-states are used to save power when the processor is idle. C0 is the operational state, meaning that the CPU is doing useful work. C1 is the first idle state, C2 the second, and so on, where more power saving actions are taken for numerically higher C-states.

Here's good article about CPU C- and P-states (C = sleep, P = power) but do note that this article goes in-depth explaining it all,
link: https://metebalci.com/blog/a-minimum-complete-tutorial-of-cpu-power-management-c-states-and-p-states/

Do note that each CPU may have different sleep states. In the article above, the Xeon E3-1245 v5 is taken as an example with C0, C1, C1e, C2, C3, C6, C7 and C8 states. While my i5-6600K has: C0, C2, C3, C6, C7, C7s and C8 states.

But to sum it up, this image says what each CPU sleep state does:


Corsair makes good quality and bad psus. Its hard to know what to look for. Corsairs vs line is horrible and the capacitors are prone to smokey failure, however psus like the corsair rmx line are very good.
I have a cx550m and have had no issues with it. The cx line is generally lower midrange and is fine for most systems, but it isnt as efficient nor as high quality as some more expensive power supplies.
Seasonic generally makes good power supplies across the lineup and its hard to go wrong with seasonic.
Just because you have no apparent issues with your CX550m (e.g PC shutting down during gaming) doesn't mean the PSU is safe to use with your components. What you don't see (but can monitor) is the voltages PSU outputs during PC's operation. And according to the ATX PSU standard, safe voltage ranges are:
+12V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +11.40V to +12.60V
+5V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +4.75V to +5.25V
+3.3V DC rail - tolerance ±5% ; +3.14V to +3.47V
-12V DC rail - tolerance ±10% ; -10.80V to -13.20V
+5V SB rail - tolerance ±5% ; +4.75V to +5.25V

Anything lower or higher than that aren't safe for PC components. Lower voltage can cause data corruption while higher voltage can fry components. While the +13V on +12V rail won't fry the CPU/GPU on the spot, +15V will. +13V on +12V rail does gradual damage to the component, considerably reducing it's lifespan until component fails completely.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
As far as Corsair and their cheaper PSUs go, especially CX and CXm series; older models of Corsair CX and CXm series (with green labels) were so bad units that they ended up as low quality units (on-par with current Corsair VS series). Corsair has since improved their CX and CXm line (with gray labels) and now, they are better but not enough to be considered as good quality PSU. All Seasonic units are either good quality or great quality (depending on the series).

Since you have CX550m in use, i'll take it as an example, starting off with reputable in-depth review,
link: https://www.hardwareinsights.com/corsair-cx550m-farewell-group-design/

Corsair CX550m does provide some good results but it also provides some bad results. Like hold-up time that is way lower than the ATX PSU standard specifies it to be. CX550m has hold-up time of 11.20 milliseconds while the ATX PSU standard for hold up time is a minimum of 16 milliseconds. For comparison, Seasonic PRIME 650 80+ Titanium (best 650W PSU money can buy at current date) has hold-up time of 30 milliseconds.

And it's just not the hold-up time, there are other, more apparent things that doesn't make it good quality unit. One of them is the very noisy sleeve bearing fan used in it. At minimum, you're looking 39 dB(A) from the fan, which can rise up to 43.1 dB(A). It's like having 140mm Noctua industrial 3000 RPM fan in your PC running at max speeds.

Since CX550m it has nice list of good things and also bad things, it's a mediocre quality unit. If there were more bad than good (including price) it would be a bad unit and vice-versa. While CXm series are cheap, you won't get solid build quality and all Japanese caps as you can get with Seasonic units.

I, personally, wouldn't use it. While it can be used just fine for an office PC that never sees any high loads and also where the PSU noise isn't that important. But for home use in a gaming PC, where PC longevity and noise are important factors, i'd use and also suggest using better quality and more silent PSU.

Different persons have different standards (some have higher standards while others have lower standards) and it's up to every person to decide how good of a build quality components are safe to use in their PC. But keep in mind that PSU is the most important component inside the PC since it powers everything.

Since i care a lot about all my PCs, i won't put a mediocre quality unit into my PC that fails to meet ATX PSU standards set in place for all PSU OEMs to follow, so that the PSUs are safe to use and doesn't damage other components. In fact, i've gone above and beyond regarding PSUs in my PCs. Some may call me nuts that i payed €206.80 for a PSU that sits in my Skylake build (Seasonic SSR-650TD) while i would've been safe with a PSU that costs €69.70 (Seasonic SS-520GM2). While that can be true and i could've saved a lot of money, i feel safe and comfortable that my main PC is powered by the best offered by Seasonic.
I won't suggest expensive PSUs in builds when the budget is way restricted. But i still suggest getting a PSU that at least meets all the ATX PSU standards, even if it's fully wired (like Seasonic SS-520GB).
 

Similar threads


ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS