[SOLVED] PC crashes/fully shuts down - No crash screen

Mar 23, 2022
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This only happens on certain games, most consistently on Rainbow Six Siege. The problem seemed to have fixed itself on those other games. This issue only came up after my pc wouldn't turn on, I fixed that, took everything out of the case and replaced psu. I don't know if keeping it out of the case could be the problem.

It does work, if I crash a few times.... I've tried so things, I'm too tired to list all of them. It only happens after 30 minutes to an hour playing in matches. I thought I fixed it before, but it started happening after I put my refresh rate to 120hz, I would put it back to 60, but it makes such a big difference and I just want to fix it.



Specs-

Computer Information:
Manufacturer: Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd.
Model: B360M-DS3H
Form Factor: Desktop

Processor Information:
CPU Vendor: GenuineIntel
CPU Brand: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-9400F CPU @ 2.90GHz
CPU Family: 0x6
CPU Model: 0x9e
CPU Stepping: 0xa
CPU Type: 0x0
Speed: 2904 Mhz
6 logical processors
6 physical processors

Operating System Version:
Windows 10 (64 bit)

Video Card:
Driver: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060
DirectX Driver Name: nvldumd.dll
Driver Version: 30.0.15.1259
DirectX Driver Version: 30.0.15.1259
Driver Date: 4 20 2022
OpenGL Version: 4.6
Monitor Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
Number of Monitors: 2
Primary Display Resolution: 1920 x 1080
Desktop Resolution: 3840 x 1080


Memory:
RAM: 16318 MB
4 sticks

Storage:
Number of SSDs: 1
SSD sizes: 500G
Number of HDDs: 4
HDD sizes: 4000G1000G66G678M
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What is the EXACT model of your power supply? What was the model of the old power supply?

Did ALL of your memory come TOGETHER, in ONE kit, or is a combination of kits or sticks that were purchased separately?

Have you done a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers using the Wagnard tools Display driver uninstaller? (DDU)

What version of Windows are you running and when was the last time, if ever, a CLEAN install of Windows was done?

Since you have five drives, four HDD and one SSD, which drive are the games installed on that you are having problems with? Have you run any health checks on the drives to see if there are any drive issues? Generally speaking, you want to look at the SMART data using something like Hard disk drive sentinel, and possibly also run the short drive self test using Seatools for Windows or WD lifeguard tools.

It might also be a good idea to run Memtest86 to rule out, well, mostly anyhow, any memory issues.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What is the EXACT model of your power supply? What was the model of the old power supply?

Did ALL of your memory come TOGETHER, in ONE kit, or is a combination of kits or sticks that were purchased separately?

Have you done a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers using the Wagnard tools Display driver uninstaller? (DDU)

What version of Windows are you running and when was the last time, if ever, a CLEAN install of Windows was done?

Since you have five drives, four HDD and one SSD, which drive are the games installed on that you are having problems with? Have you run any health checks on the drives to see if there are any drive issues? Generally speaking, you want to look at the SMART data using something like Hard disk drive sentinel, and possibly also run the short drive self test using Seatools for Windows or WD lifeguard tools.

It might also be a good idea to run Memtest86 to rule out, well, mostly anyhow, any memory issues.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 
Mar 23, 2022
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What is the EXACT model of your power supply? What was the model of the old power supply?

Did ALL of your memory come TOGETHER, in ONE kit, or is a combination of kits or sticks that were purchased separately?

Have you done a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers using the Wagnard tools Display driver uninstaller? (DDU)

What version of Windows are you running and when was the last time, if ever, a CLEAN install of Windows was done?

Since you have five drives, four HDD and one SSD, which drive are the games installed on that you are having problems with? Have you run any health checks on the drives to see if there are any drive issues? Generally speaking, you want to look at the SMART data using something like Hard disk drive sentinel, and possibly also run the short drive self test using Seatools for Windows or WD lifeguard tools.

It might also be a good idea to run Memtest86 to rule out, well, mostly anyhow, any memory issues.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.


Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86. Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


You CAN use Memtest86+, as they've recently updated the program after MANY years of no updates, but for the purpose of this guide I recommend using the Passmark version as this is a tried and true utility while I've not had the opportunity to investigate the reliability of the latest 86+ release as compared to Memtest86. Possibly, consider using Memtest86+ as simply a secondary test to Memtest86, much as Windows memory diagnostic utility and Prime95 Blend or custom modes can be used for a second opinion utility.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP, non-custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
Thank you for the reply. "What is the EXACT model of your power supply? What was the model of the old power supply?" They both are EVGA 600w. "Did ALL of your memory come TOGETHER, in ONE kit, or is a combination of kits or sticks that were purchased separately?" No, they did not, I bought 2 4gb x2 kits, of the same brand, not speed though. "Have you done a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers using the Wagnard tools Display driver uninstaller? (DDU)" No, but I've reinstalled in via geforce, does that make a difference? "What version of Windows are you running and when was the last time, if ever, a CLEAN install of Windows was done?" I am running windows 10, I think last time I did a clean install was at the beginning of the year. "Since you have five drives, four HDD and one SSD, which drive are the games installed on that you are having problems with? Have you run any health checks on the drives to see if there are any drive issues? Generally speaking, you want to look at the SMART data using something like Hard disk drive sentinel, and possibly also run the short drive self test using Seatools for Windows or WD lifeguard tools." I don't know why it says I have 5 drives. I actually have 3, 1 ssd and 2 hdds. The games are installed on my newly bought 4tb barracuda.

I will try using Memtest86+ tomorrow as it is late and i'm tired. I will update when I do it.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
WHICH "EVGA 600w" models? Just saying EVGA 600w means literally nothing. Models are what matters. EVGA has both ok and really bad 600w models.

The fact that you have two different memory kits installed is a very high probability issue. And, you need to make SURE that you have both DIMMs that came in the fastest kit installed in the 2nd and 4th slots over from the CPU socket. The 4th DIMM being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard. These are generally, but not always, called the A2 and B2 slots, or occasionally DIMM_A2 and DIMM_B2, but regardless they are the second and fourth slots.

Install your fastest kit in those slots and remove the other two DIMMs. Then run your games to see if you are still getting problems. If so, swap those two DIMMs out for the other kit, in the same slots, and try again. If you still have problems then install the original two DIMMs back into the second and fourth slots and run Memtest86 for four passes as I outlined above. Or, you can simply run Memtest86 with all four DIMMs installed from the start. This will take a significant amount of time to run. Memtest usually takes several hours to complete all four passes of the 11 tests.

Let me know when you have time to get back to this. Good luck.
 
Mar 23, 2022
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W1 Series 600W ATX 12V/EPS 12V 80 Plus. Model:100-W1-0600-K1. I might've found a big problem, it seems I have 3 kits installed. I think when I bought a kit they gave me 2 different sticks. One is 2400 and the other is 2133, this is what I originally got (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074Q1YX92/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). The other kit is 2400. I switched the ram around before to try to fix some other problems, but now the 2400 is in 2nd and 4th slots.

I finished doing the Memtest86. It passed all tests on default settings, at 2133MHz. I wasn't supposed to change any xmp settings if there weren't any errors right? I only play with the memory at default settings.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So, if you have three sets of memory, you have to make some decisions.

My advice would be, get rid of them all, and get ONE set that has the full capacity you want to run, at the speed you want. But, your finances might not be able to accommodate that. Money is tight these days and hardware is generally expensive. But that is your BEST option.

Your next best option is, get rid of everything except the kit that has two matching DIMMs and you can TRY to get another identical kit, but I'm going to link you to my memory guide that will at least loosely explain exactly why I say that is a bad idea.



I say buy one kit that has two DIMMs in it, that has the full capacity you want to run, at the speed you can run at, which for your system and motherboard is 2666mhz. But I'll leave that up to you.

The PSU you have, is a complete pile of crap. Sorry, it's simply the truth. The W1 and N1 units, are just @#$%ing junk. They are absolutely some of the worst units ever sold by a well known brand name that isn't Thermaltake or Cooler Master. And actually, they are as bad as some of THOSE bad units, like the older Thermaltake TR2 models. Literally, I alone, by myself, have probably worked at least 200 threads on this forum over the last 8 years that were resolved by replacing an N1 or W1 unit, and most of them were not very old. They just suck. So with your hardware, even if the PSU is not the exact problem, it would be a VERY, VERY GOOD idea to replace them with something better and just so that you don't think I'm simply targeting YOUR W1 power supply, please have a read at the following link and pay particular attention to the EVGA section.


And then take a read here as well, and between those two resources, find yourself a much better unit one way or another.

 
Mar 23, 2022
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So, if you have three sets of memory, you have to make some decisions.

My advice would be, get rid of them all, and get ONE set that has the full capacity you want to run, at the speed you want. But, your finances might not be able to accommodate that. Money is tight these days and hardware is generally expensive. But that is your BEST option.

Your next best option is, get rid of everything except the kit that has two matching DIMMs and you can TRY to get another identical kit, but I'm going to link you to my memory guide that will at least loosely explain exactly why I say that is a bad idea.



I say buy one kit that has two DIMMs in it, that has the full capacity you want to run, at the speed you can run at, which for your system and motherboard is 2666mhz. But I'll leave that up to you.

The PSU you have, is a complete pile of crap. Sorry, it's simply the truth. The W1 and N1 units, are just @#$%ing junk. They are absolutely some of the worst units ever sold by a well known brand name that isn't Thermaltake or Cooler Master. And actually, they are as bad as some of THOSE bad units, like the older Thermaltake TR2 models. Literally, I alone, by myself, have probably worked at least 200 threads on this forum over the last 8 years that were resolved by replacing an N1 or W1 unit, and most of them were not very old. They just suck. So with your hardware, even if the PSU is not the exact problem, it would be a VERY, VERY GOOD idea to replace them with something better and just so that you don't think I'm simply targeting YOUR W1 power supply, please have a read at the following link and pay particular attention to the EVGA section.


And then take a read here as well, and between those two resources, find yourself a much better unit one way or another.

Siege seemed to have worked now that I switched the weird kits to 1 and 3. I am tight on money, so it will be a bit till I can do something about the ram or psu. I looked at many reviews about the psu and they said it was good, wish I would've known it would be like this otherwise I wouldn't have bought it twice :/ Thank you for time though.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I looked at many reviews about the psu and they said it was good,
I don't know what reviews you looked at, unless they were on Amazon and Newegg, which are entirely useless because you have to understand that those places give good reviews for things like "it showed up", "the box was not crushed" and "it started", so they literally mean nothing.

Professional reviews and YEARS of our own public consensus from dealing with specific units over, and over, and over, and over again, are what you NEED to pay attention to, when you want to get some accurate information about something. Anything for that matter. Not just PSUs, but literally anything. If there is no professional, trustworthy review, and no community consensus on some kind of forum where people who know WTF they are talking about can INTELLIGENTLY and CLEARLY explain why a thing is or at lest seems to be "good", then it is probably not worth even considering.

Let me show you why the "reviews" you looked at, are worthless. Not all of these are the "exact" W1 model you have, but they are all regarding the W1 series, and it is pretty seriously piss poor quality. It's a dangerous unit that did not fully afford the protections that it SAID it had, and didn't have the full set of protections that it SHOULD have had, and had poor track record when it comes to ripple and voltage regulation as well. Plus, none of them were ever able to reliably provide their rated wattage. At all. Especially after having gone around the block once or twice.

EVGA

They have BOTH good and not very good models and most of their products that can be recommended are those based on various Super Flower platforms Do NOT simply choose a power supply because it carries the EVGA name, because while they certainly have some excellent models, they have some absolute turds as well and I mean models well known for failure practically every time they are put into a gaming or other system with moderately demanding requirements.

Not very good are the W1, N1, B1, B3 (Most B3 models failed Aris Mpitziopoulos stringent testing), BQ, BR, BT and G1 NEX models. EVGA seems to like releasing a new model every other week so there are possibly other unlisted models that you'd do well to avoid beyond these. When in doubt, if you can't find a review on an EVGA unit, it's probably because it is either too new, or it's quality is seriously lacking.

Good models are the B2, GQ, G2, G2L, G3, P2 and T2 models. Seems that the EVGA G5 series might be best avoided. The OEM is FSP on the one reliable review so far which was for the 1000w model, and while likely not strictly FSP's fault, the unit did not look like a worthy successor to the G2 or even the G3, which itself was not as good as the G2 but still better than most units out there. There are other, better choices than the G5 at this price point including their own G2 models, which, are getting hard to find. I think even the GQ units would be a better choice.
Tier E • Potentially dangerous in multiple scenarios

• Armageddon | All units
• BR ONE | BR-X
• Corsair | VS 2012 [orange-label]
• Cooler Master | Elite - Realpower - B2
• Diablotek | All units
• EVGA | N1 - N2 - W1
• Gigabyte | P-GM [non-Aorus] <=850W [1]
• LEPA | MaxBron
• NOX | All units [2]
• Raidmax | Non-rated units
• Rasurbo | All units
• Solid Gear | Neutron
• Tacens | All units
• Trust | All units
• Ultron | All units
https://linustechtips.com/topic/1019585-how-bad-is-the-500w-evga-80-w1-psu/?do=findComment&comment=12175373

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/evga-650w-n1-power-supply-review/6


https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/are-evga-power-supplies-good.3708555/post-22353896




And I could list literally dozens if not hundreds more just like that, especially if I included other forums and resources.
 
Mar 23, 2022
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I don't know what reviews you looked at, unless they were on Amazon and Newegg, which are entirely useless because you have to understand that those places give good reviews for things like "it showed up", "the box was not crushed" and "it started", so they literally mean nothing.

Professional reviews and YEARS of our own public consensus from dealing with specific units over, and over, and over, and over again, are what you NEED to pay attention to, when you want to get some accurate information about something. Anything for that matter. Not just PSUs, but literally anything. If there is no professional, trustworthy review, and no community consensus on some kind of forum where people who know WTF they are talking about can INTELLIGENTLY and CLEARLY explain why a thing is or at lest seems to be "good", then it is probably not worth even considering.

Let me show you why the "reviews" you looked at, are worthless. Not all of these are the "exact" W1 model you have, but they are all regarding the W1 series, and it is pretty seriously piss poor quality. It's a dangerous unit that did not fully afford the protections that it SAID it had, and didn't have the full set of protections that it SHOULD have had, and had poor track record when it comes to ripple and voltage regulation as well. Plus, none of them were ever able to reliably provide their rated wattage. At all. Especially after having gone around the block once or twice.





https://linustechtips.com/topic/1019585-how-bad-is-the-500w-evga-80-w1-psu/?do=findComment&comment=12175373

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/evga-650w-n1-power-supply-review/6


https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/are-evga-power-supplies-good.3708555/post-22353896




And I could list literally dozens if not hundreds more just like that, especially if I included other forums and resources.
Well damn. So you're saying that this psu could possibly harm my system?

I don't remember exactly where I saw the reviews since I got the psu 1-2 years ago.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
It's not a "probability" that it will harm your hardware, but it IS a probability that it might or has caused "problems". And it IS a "possibility" that it could potentially be damaging to your hardware if the poor quality components used inside those units fail, or it's poorly implemented protections fail.

The biggest problem with these units, is that they have problems. And 9 times out of 10 you won't even realize that it's the PSU causing a problem because the majority of people figure if the system turns on and runs then the power supply is working correctly which couldn't be further from the truth. A power supply can "work" and still result in hardware that operates anywhere from barely, with lots of obvious issues, all the way to "occasional weird glitches" that you scratch your head over but can never figure out.

And much like the old Corsair CX600 units, I've seen more instances of a W1 or N1 series power supply taking out a motherboard or other hardware than I can count on one hand, and that's too many times for a product coming from a mostly well respected company like EVGA. But like most companies, they have both very good and very poor products.
 
Mar 23, 2022
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It's not a "probability" that it will harm your hardware, but it IS a probability that it might or has caused "problems". And it IS a "possibility" that it could potentially be damaging to your hardware if the poor quality components used inside those units fail, or it's poorly implemented protections fail.

The biggest problem with these units, is that they have problems. And 9 times out of 10 you won't even realize that it's the PSU causing a problem because the majority of people figure if the system turns on and runs then the power supply is working correctly which couldn't be further from the truth. A power supply can "work" and still result in hardware that operates anywhere from barely, with lots of obvious issues, all the way to "occasional weird glitches" that you scratch your head over but can never figure out.

And much like the old Corsair CX600 units, I've seen more instances of a W1 or N1 series power supply taking out a motherboard or other hardware than I can count on one hand, and that's too many times for a product coming from a mostly well respected company like EVGA. But like most companies, they have both very good and very poor products.
Well all of that is good to know, thank you. I will try to get a new one soon, just annoying that I bought the new one 2-3 weeks ago...
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If you bought it within the last 30 days, I'd just try to take it back. Indicate you're having problems that seem to be PSU related and you want to return it, and upgrade to a better quality model. If you're in the US I think all 50 states have 30 day return policy laws for most products. If not, most stores do anyhow. Might at least be worth a try. If not, then maybe sell it to somebody with a system that doesn't really need that kind of capacity. Those units will usually work ok on systems that have very low powered or integrated graphics adapters.

I mean, I wouldn't use one, unless it was a really low priority system and I was really in a pinch, and then, only temporary, but still. It's an option to try and get back some of your investment.
 

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