[SOLVED] pc crashing cause of front pannel audio.

eziowar

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hi, my cpu i5-4670k, gpu - zotac 1050ti mini, mobo- gigabyte z87x-ud3h, bios version F10b, psu corsair cs650m, corsair ram 4x4gb @1600 mhz, Crucia MX 500 500gb ssd, WD 1TB sata internal hdd, AHCI,windows10, cabinet cooler master haf 912, cpu cooler-Hyper 212X
few days back, i was listening to music on my Pc using 5.1 speakers on max volume, suddenly my pc crashed, during that time my headphone was connected on front pannel and those speakers were connected to back pannel of my mother board. since then my pc is crashing whenever i turn it on if my chassis front panel audio module (headphone ) is connected to the F_AUDIO header on motherboard ( see the pic please ) -

.that front panel audio module has two different jacks - Intel High Definition audio (HD) and AC'97 audio to insert in the F_AUDIO header . i use Intel High Definition audio (HD). i have freshly reinstalled all the audio drivers but still same issue happening. how do i fix it? the driver is realtek hd audio driver.
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
"sfc /scannow" and "dism" are used to repair software problems.

I would run them without the audio header attached to ensure that both tools have a full chance to find and fix anything astray without a crash that could make things even worse.

Then reattach the audio header to the hd audio connector and determine if the crashes continue.

My approach would be to first run Reliability History and print out some screenshots of errors/entries for the current day -as a "before" reference.

Then run sfc /scannow and dism.

And, should there be other crashes then again look in Reliability History for the "after".

Premise being that sfc /scannow and dism found and fixed some problems. Any remaining problems in the "after" then providing focus on what might be happening.

Reliability History is overall user friendly. Event Viewer can be helpful but is not as easy to navigate and understand.

Still worth a look and try.

FYI from this Forum:

http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-3128616/windows-event-viewer.html
 
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Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
So, until the crash, everything was working without problems and no changes of any sort were made - correct?

Double check that all audio connectors are fully and firmly in place.

Use a bright flashlight to take a look for any signs of damage to connectors, wires, plugs, and ports.
 

eziowar

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So, until the crash, everything was working without problems and no changes of any sort were made - correct?

Double check that all audio connectors are fully and firmly in place.

Use a bright flashlight to take a look for any signs of damage to connectors, wires, plugs, and ports.
yes until the crash, everything was working without problems and no changes of any sort were made . And theres no physical damage to any connectors. the driver is realtek hd audio driver.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for any error codes, warnings, or informational events that may have been captured just before or at the time of the crash.

Or may have been likewise captured while subsequently attempting to restore audio.

Then try running the built in Windows troubleshooters. The troubleshooters may find and fix something.

Then try "sfc /scannow" and "dism".

References:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-use-sfc-scannow-to-repair-windows-system-files-2626161

How to use DISM command tool to repair Windows 10 image | Windows Central

All just as means to eliminate some software related cause.

It could be that even if all was working well before (or seemed to be) then there still could have been some latent problem that was pushing some limit.

And some component simply gave out.

Take a closer look at all of the audio connections. Look for loops, mismatched pin outs, improper cables, adapters; anything that could have been allowing current to go where it should not have been going.

Use the F_Audio pin outs (pin assignments) to map the connections being made inside your PC.

Note the sentence: "Incorrect connection between the module connector and the motherboard header will make the device unable to work or damage it."

Overall premise being that, while working, damaging was being done and somewhere finally reached the point of failure.

FYI regarding ports and plugs:

https://www.cablechick.com.au/blog/understanding-trrs-and-audio-jacks/
 
Reactions: eziowar

eziowar

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Jun 11, 2015
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Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for any error codes, warnings, or informational events that may have been captured just before or at the time of the crash.

Or may have been likewise captured while subsequently attempting to restore audio.

Then try running the built in Windows troubleshooters. The troubleshooters may find and fix something.

Then try "sfc /scannow" and "dism".

References:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-use-sfc-scannow-to-repair-windows-system-files-2626161

How to use DISM command tool to repair Windows 10 image | Windows Central

All just as means to eliminate some software related cause.

It could be that even if all was working well before (or seemed to be) then there still could have been some latent problem that was pushing some limit.

And some component simply gave out.

Take a closer look at all of the audio connections. Look for loops, mismatched pin outs, improper cables, adapters; anything that could have been allowing current to go where it should not have been going.

Use the F_Audio pin outs (pin assignments) to map the connections being made inside your PC.

Note the sentence: "Incorrect connection between the module connector and the motherboard header will make the device unable to work or damage it."

Overall premise being that, while working, damaging was being done and somewhere finally reached the point of failure.

FYI regarding ports and plugs:

https://www.cablechick.com.au/blog/understanding-trrs-and-audio-jacks/
Tyvm. Btw do i need to run "sfc /scannow" and "dism" while the audio header is attached to hd audio connector? But it will crash within few minutes.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
"sfc /scannow" and "dism" are used to repair software problems.

I would run them without the audio header attached to ensure that both tools have a full chance to find and fix anything astray without a crash that could make things even worse.

Then reattach the audio header to the hd audio connector and determine if the crashes continue.

My approach would be to first run Reliability History and print out some screenshots of errors/entries for the current day -as a "before" reference.

Then run sfc /scannow and dism.

And, should there be other crashes then again look in Reliability History for the "after".

Premise being that sfc /scannow and dism found and fixed some problems. Any remaining problems in the "after" then providing focus on what might be happening.

Reliability History is overall user friendly. Event Viewer can be helpful but is not as easy to navigate and understand.

Still worth a look and try.

FYI from this Forum:

http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-3128616/windows-event-viewer.html
 
Reactions: eziowar

eziowar

Distinguished
Jun 11, 2015
209
6
18,695
0
"sfc /scannow" and "dism" are used to repair software problems.

I would run them without the audio header attached to ensure that both tools have a full chance to find and fix anything astray without a crash that could make things even worse.

Then reattach the audio header to the hd audio connector and determine if the crashes continue.

My approach would be to first run Reliability History and print out some screenshots of errors/entries for the current day -as a "before" reference.

Then run sfc /scannow and dism.

And, should there be other crashes then again look in Reliability History for the "after".

Premise being that sfc /scannow and dism found and fixed some problems. Any remaining problems in the "after" then providing focus on what might be happening.

Reliability History is overall user friendly. Event Viewer can be helpful but is not as easy to navigate and understand.

Still worth a look and try.

FYI from this Forum:

http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-3128616/windows-event-viewer.html
Tyvm. but Running dism just gave these info within 1 sec, nothing else happened-
 

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