PC Desktop : Core i5-3450, EGeForce GT 610 2GB, 16GB RAM upgrade advice

Jan 18, 2019
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My compute is a bit sluggish - any advice on what upgrades may help to improve the performance?

1) Intel Core i5-3450 Processor (BX80637I53450)
2) ASUS P8Z77-V LX LGA 1155 Motherboard
3) Corsair Vengeance 16GB (4x4GB) DDR3 1600MHz Desktop Memory (CMZ16GX3M4A1600C9B) - Blue
4) EVGA GeForce GT 610 2GB DDR3 PCI-E Video Card (02G-P3-2617-KR)
5) Antec Three Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
6) Western Digital WD Green WD15EARS 1.5TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive
7) LiteOn 24X Internal DVD Writer (IHAS524-98)
8) Corsair 600W PC Power Supply (CMPSU-600CXV2)
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
You have more memory than most computers of the time had. 16GB is still what I am running in my systems. More memory will only have significant impact if you actually consume that much during regular use. It is doubtful you can get significantly faster memory in that system. DDR3 1600 is all that CPU officially supports. If you had an unlocked CPU, you could get 1866, 2133, or 2400 possibly. But that does incur increased latency. Depends on what you do whether latency or bandwidth is important.

Can't go wrong with an SSD. Any SATA model will do just nicely. Samsung 850 Evo is a common recommendation. Crucial MX500, Kingston HyperX, and many others. You would want one large enough for your OS and your most commonly used applications. 240GB is typical. You would use a tool like Macrium Reflect to clone your OS to the new drive. That should drop boot times down in the tens of seconds at worst.

If you wanted a faster graphics card, maybe you are using some hardware accelerated web sites or graphics applications (photo editing can use GPUs for example) Then something like a GT1030 or RX550 would be leaps and bounds ahead of what you have now. No additional power required. Though your power supply is certainly capable of more, but physical card size starts to become a constraint.

You have one of those chassis that has drive cages top to bottom, so any GPU larger than standard 10" will not really fit. Cards up to the GTX1050Ti and some GTX1060 models (those with a single fan) will fit. Not as familiar with the mid-range RX cards, but they are typically larger as they run hotter. You can probably find some RX570 or RX580 models that would fit in there. Cards that large are really for gaming and have little utility outside of certain graphically demanding applications.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Sluggish in what way?

Step one, remove the graphics card. Use the integrated Intel graphics if you aren't playing games. If playing games, step one, get an actual gaming graphics card.

Step two, Get an SSD for the OS. WD Green is not the fastest hard drive in world and that can make a huge impact on the general performance of Windows/Linux.

Actually the 610 is a tiny bit faster than the Intel HD 2500, at least according to user benchmark, but not by much. Not the most trustworthy source either. At the low end you might find different clock speeds and memory speeds on each GPU.
 
Jan 18, 2019
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Hi Eximo, thanks for your help- I am not gaming- but is there any way that I can find out what Graphic Cards and SSD drives are supported by the mother-board I have? Do you think that I need to upgrade the Ram as well? I need something works really fast ans seamless and not takes 10 min to reboot.




 

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