[SOLVED] PC freezes, no power to mouse or keyboard, power button does nothing

jonathonveitch83

Commendable
Feb 17, 2018
48
0
1,540
1
I got back to my computer, I left it for a few minutes, and the screen was frozen. There were also no lights on the keyboard or mouse. I tried to hold the power button to turn it off but it didn't do anything so I turned it off at the plug.

I checked the windows event log when I restarted and there was nothing I could find at the time it froze (I know the time because the desktop clock was frozen).
This isn't the first time this has happened, although it is a rare occurrence. I should note that I had this issue A LOT before I swapped motherboard, CPU and RAM.

Any ideas?
 
Thanks for the reply, my PSU is a Corsair CX750M, I've had it for years. I swapped it out temporarily a while back to try and fix a separate issue but reinstalled it when it didn't make a difference.

As for temps, do you know of any programs that actively log the temperature, if my PC freezes I won't be able to tell what the temps were. As for normal temps my CPU gets to mid 60s when playing games and the GPU mid 70s. I'm still using a Corsair H60 I got ages ago.
That power supply should be plenty for 99% of computers and if those are the high temps, then that is not the problem.

So, you get into the less common stuff and how hard you try to hunt this down will probably depend on how often it crashes. Once a month, I would shrug and live with it ... once a week, I would be pretty annoyed ... once a day, the screw driver is coming out!

With a lot of the less common stuff fixing the problem requires replacing a part. One thing that doesn't ... overheating VRMs. This is an issue common to systems with water coolers and high power CPUs (and cheap motherboards). VRMs are located near the CPU. Air coolers will often blow air on or near them. Highend motherboards will have nice heatsinks on top of the VRMs, but you still need some air movement (yes, you get some with just convection). I just mention this because it's a pretty easy to temporarily put a fan blowing on them and test the system. If it fixes it, then you may want to look for a better solutions.

Other possibilities ... slight glitch in RAM or RAM controller ... you might have to run memtest86 all night just to see 1 error.
A blown capacitor? Variation in house power (do your lights flicker)? ???
 
I got back to my computer, I left it for a few minutes, and the screen was frozen. There were also no lights on the keyboard or mouse. I tried to hold the power button to turn it off but it didn't do anything so I turned it off at the plug.

I checked the windows event log when I restarted and there was nothing I could find at the time it froze (I know the time because the desktop clock was frozen).
This isn't the first time this has happened, although it is a rare occurrence. I should note that I had this issue A LOT before I swapped motherboard, CPU and RAM.

Any ideas?
Nothing in the event log, so probably not a software issue. Hardware wise, this kind of thing is often related to overheating or power issues. There are plenty of other potential issues, but those are the most common, so check them first.

Do you have software the monitors temperature? If not, get some. HWinfo64 is a solid choice. You maybe also be able to download something specific to your motherboard.

PSU ... find the make and model if you can.
 

jonathonveitch83

Commendable
Feb 17, 2018
48
0
1,540
1
Nothing in the event log, so probably not a software issue. Hardware wise, this kind of thing is often related to overheating or power issues. There are plenty of other potential issues, but those are the most common, so check them first.

Do you have software the monitors temperature? If not, get some. HWinfo64 is a solid choice. You maybe also be able to download something specific to your motherboard.

PSU ... find the make and model if you can.
Thanks for the reply, my PSU is a Corsair CX750M, I've had it for years. I swapped it out temporarily a while back to try and fix a separate issue but reinstalled it when it didn't make a difference.

As for temps, do you know of any programs that actively log the temperature, if my PC freezes I won't be able to tell what the temps were. As for normal temps my CPU gets to mid 60s when playing games and the GPU mid 70s. I'm still using a Corsair H60 I got ages ago.
 
Thanks for the reply, my PSU is a Corsair CX750M, I've had it for years. I swapped it out temporarily a while back to try and fix a separate issue but reinstalled it when it didn't make a difference.

As for temps, do you know of any programs that actively log the temperature, if my PC freezes I won't be able to tell what the temps were. As for normal temps my CPU gets to mid 60s when playing games and the GPU mid 70s. I'm still using a Corsair H60 I got ages ago.
That power supply should be plenty for 99% of computers and if those are the high temps, then that is not the problem.

So, you get into the less common stuff and how hard you try to hunt this down will probably depend on how often it crashes. Once a month, I would shrug and live with it ... once a week, I would be pretty annoyed ... once a day, the screw driver is coming out!

With a lot of the less common stuff fixing the problem requires replacing a part. One thing that doesn't ... overheating VRMs. This is an issue common to systems with water coolers and high power CPUs (and cheap motherboards). VRMs are located near the CPU. Air coolers will often blow air on or near them. Highend motherboards will have nice heatsinks on top of the VRMs, but you still need some air movement (yes, you get some with just convection). I just mention this because it's a pretty easy to temporarily put a fan blowing on them and test the system. If it fixes it, then you may want to look for a better solutions.

Other possibilities ... slight glitch in RAM or RAM controller ... you might have to run memtest86 all night just to see 1 error.
A blown capacitor? Variation in house power (do your lights flicker)? ???
 

jonathonveitch83

Commendable
Feb 17, 2018
48
0
1,540
1
That power supply should be plenty for 99% of computers and if those are the high temps, then that is not the problem.

So, you get into the less common stuff and how hard you try to hunt this down will probably depend on how often it crashes. Once a month, I would shrug and live with it ... once a week, I would be pretty annoyed ... once a day, the screw driver is coming out!

With a lot of the less common stuff fixing the problem requires replacing a part. One thing that doesn't ... overheating VRMs. This is an issue common to systems with water coolers and high power CPUs (and cheap motherboards). VRMs are located near the CPU. Air coolers will often blow air on or near them. Highend motherboards will have nice heatsinks on top of the VRMs, but you still need some air movement (yes, you get some with just convection). I just mention this because it's a pretty easy to temporarily put a fan blowing on them and test the system. If it fixes it, then you may want to look for a better solutions.

Other possibilities ... slight glitch in RAM or RAM controller ... you might have to run memtest86 all night just to see 1 error.
A blown capacitor? Variation in house power (do your lights flicker)? ???
It doesn't happen often so I'll just passively look for the cause as time goes on. My motherboard is a Strix B350-f with pretty beefy VRM heatsinks so I'm not sure about that. I'll run Memtest86 overnight soon just to check the RAM. I appreciate the help though.
 

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