Question PC gremlin

Apr 19, 2019
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Hi.
I have had a recurring issue with my pc for the past 12 months that has me completely stumped. My pc will suddenly lose power while under load and refuses to turn on again until I have either turned the power point off or flipped the switch on and off on my psu. Even sitting at the desktop or BIOS it will suddenly lose power. I've monitored all temperatures, and they're all within safe ranges even under the stress of video games.

CPU 30-35c idle and casual browsing, GPU 45-50c idle and casual browsing, MOBO 30-40c while idle and casual browsing, PSU fans are spinning and blows cold air. CPU while gaming 40-50c, GPU while gaming 50-60c, and MOBO while gaming 50-60c.

All my parts are from PCcasegear, and I've sent the parts back under warrenty twice so far and they can't find an issue, and have thusfar refused to replace my parts. I've plugged my system in every wall socket in my house and i still get a loss of power, I've reinstalled drivers, windows, swapped out PSU, GPU, and taken out 1 ram stick at a time, covered all remaining PSU cables with electrical tape, and even swapped my parts out into another case. My next step is to buy a UPS with an AVR, and cross my fingers that it works.

My PC specs are as follows.

Ryzen 5 2600 w Wraith Spire Heatskin fan

Radeon RX480 OC 8GB

CORSAIR DDR4 3000Mhz RAM

MSI B350M Bazooka Motherboard AM4

Corsair MWE 750W 80+ gold power supply

Intel 250gb 540s series SSD

PERIPHERALS AND MONITOR
Ttesports keyboard

Steel series TALON blu mouse

And an ASUS 144HZ gaming monitor
 

panathas

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Feb 12, 2014
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You should try to test your system with another PSU. This issue is definitely power related. However it could also be the motherboard or the GPU but you should first try to use a different PSU with your PC.

EDIT. Also the PSU is a Coolermaster model not a Corsair one.
 
Last edited:
Apr 19, 2019
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I have tested it with a different PSU, and I've come back with the same issue.
I cant test anything else as i have no interchangable parts to do so.

Cheers for the correction mate. It's like you didn't read anything I outlined in the thread.
 

panathas

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Feb 12, 2014
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Sorry for the mistake. I usually look first at the parts and may skip some details in the process. ;)

Which PSU did you use for the test? Did the 2nd PSU change anything? Can you RMA the motherboard? Have you tried testing you PC at another house? If it works there then a UPS may help you but you can be 100% sure especially if you have an electrical issue with your house. Do you have similar issues with other electronic equipment?
 

cherry blossoms

Reputable
Apr 13, 2016
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Overclocked? Drop to stock clocks.

4+2 power phase design. The VRMs may need additional cooling.

Dropping your memory clock to 2133 or 2400 may help with stability. Anything over 2400 is an overclocked memory setting on that board
Loosening your memory timings may help with stability as well.
 
Apr 19, 2019
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SilverStone 600w 80+ bronze psu.
The second psu is what i suspected was causing the problem to begin with and is why i bought the 750w psu. I have sent it to numerous peoples houses and they have come back with no issue apparently, though none of them seemed to stress test the pc to my standards.

I have indeed tried to rma my parts, but pccasegear will not allow replacements unless an issue has been found with said parts.

Sometimes the breaker flips in my house, and the kitchen and my bedroom lose power.

EDIT: Usually its the kettle that flips the breaker.
 
Last edited:
Apr 19, 2019
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Overclocked? Drop to stock clocks.

4+2 power phase design. The VRMs may need additional cooling.

Dropping your memory clock to 2133 or 2400 may help with stability. Anything over 2400 is an overclocked memory setting on that board
Loosening your memory timings may help with stability as well.
Not overclocked, no.

The RAM is rated to 3000mhz but is set to 2133mhz as stock. My apologies, I should have mentioned that in the OP.
 

panathas

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Feb 12, 2014
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You have to have someone check the whole electrical installation of your house. Something seems to be wrong there. PSUs are very sensitive and it seems that a protection mechanism is kicking in, trying to save the PSU from damage. Maybe an over-current or over-voltage protection, you can't know for sure unless someone checks the power line. A UPS will certainly help but if you have unstable power inside your house all the time, you will risk damaging the UPS and perhaps killing it prematurely, especially the battery. Finally the good thing about a UPS is that once you plug it in you'll immediately learn if the wall socket you are using provides "good" or "bad" power. Good luck.
 

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