Discussion pc is acting up after installing win 10

Sep 19, 2019
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so, as you can see by the title, i have been having MAJOR issues with my pc. i bought it in 2017. new parts and up to date. i recently got a new sandisk 250gb SSD and installed windows on it last night but to my suprise i had major issue's. Before i get started here are my pc specs.
msi b350 gaming pro MOBO
msi gtx 1050 ti x4g
sandisk 250gb SSD
3 hard drives 2 500gb, one 250gb
amd ryzen 5 1600x
8gb (1) ddr4 ram stick. and fans which wont matter


[Moderator note: edited the following to break up "wall of text" .]

so, back on track, i installed windows last night and it was acting weird.

at first the only screen that would come on was my second monitor which has a vga port attached to my 1050. but i got that fixed.

then everytime i would sign in to windows, after 3 mins it would crash and say Clock_watchdog_timeout, which i know has to deal with the cpu or something being over heated but my CPU stays around 30-48-C.

now heres the kicker, EVERYTHING is on in my pc. its working and im typing on it as we speak. but my main thing is why is windows not detecting my graphics card.i try installing the drivers and everytime i get the PROGRAM installed it says there isnt a device to be updated or installed to.

ive NEVER had this problem and it was working perfectly fine yesterday when i didnt install windows on my ssd.

now windows is just messing with me and stuff. please help i have a csgo match tonight at 9:00pm est and i need this dont by then. ive tried everything from overclocking(i am able to) to not over clocking my CPU to adhere to the watchdog BSOD.

another thing, when i go to device manager on control panel and go to "display adapters" it says video controller (vga Compatable) so it DOES recognize there is a GPU there but cant seem to find the name or proper drivers for it.

another problem is t hat ive tried to fix this with my own troubleshooting by updating windows on the windows settings but there are a ton of errors including the NVIDIA graphics updates.

so that TELLS me that windows does recognize my gpu is there! if you lots need any pictures i will send them just ask
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
PSU: Make, model, wattage, age, condition?

Go back to a basic configuration. No OC, just the boot drive, one monitor.

Get the system up and running with the goal being stable performance, no errors, no issues.

If that goal is achieved then start introducing the other enhancements. Such as overclocking.

Do only one thing at a time and do not proceed until all problems with that enhancement are resolved.

Takes time and you must be thorough and methodical.
 
Sep 19, 2019
7
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10
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PSU: Make, model, wattage, age, condition?

Go back to a basic configuration. No OC, just the boot drive, one monitor.

Get the system up and running with the goal being stable performance, no errors, no issues.

If that goal is achieved then start introducing the other enhancements. Such as overclocking.

Do only one thing at a time and do not proceed until all problems with that enhancement are resolved.

Takes time and you must be thorough and methodical.
My psu is a thermaltake 600w. It's in perfect condition and fairly new. Again keep in mind I only bought this PC 2 years ago. Everything in it is up to date with new gen PCs if that makes sense
 
Sep 19, 2019
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I have a AMD not Intel nor can I find GPU Z. If it is in the BIOS. I've looked all over the bios for my GPU but I cannot find it. Dont even see where the PCI and PCIE settings are in the BIOS. Keep in mind EVERYTHING is on and in working condition. But when I run like files explorer for example with chrome after 3 mins it crashed then I have to restart it. And the weird thing is, I dont see clock_watchdog_TIMEOUT too much. I've tested leaving it for a minute or 2 when it crashed to see if the error pulled up. But it didn't. Every like 10 times it crashes I get that error. Also, I have cleared the CMOS twice and still having the same issues. I really think is windows messing with my PC. Another note to add if I didnt add it into the ORIG. Post, I had windows installed on my hard drive last time. Last night I reinstalled it to my brand new ssd I got only days ago. After it was done my PC was acting weird. Only problems is the crashing and my graphics card not being picked up by windows. I got to device management and it has the windows display. The weird thing is, I have my hdmi cord in my GPU and it's working fine. Just cant find it so I can start the driver updates for NVIDIA. To insure windows cant find it, I've downloaded the latest nvidia driver and it says basically it can work on this version of windows. I have windows 10 and had it since I bought my pc
 
Sep 19, 2019
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Im aware you use an amd cpu, but thag intel article is still helpfull as clearing cmos is the same on intel and amd.

check t his tweet out. this is what it says which is weird. it literally say msi right there and has the NVIDIA driver version. but it has the name video controller(VGA compatible)
View: https://twitter.com/oogingy/status/1174826771952349189?s=20

the tweet is the screen shot i just took for you
 
Sep 19, 2019
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check t his tweet out. this is what it says which is weird. it literally say msi right there and has the NVIDIA driver version. but it has the name video controller(VGA compatible)
View: https://twitter.com/oogingy/status/1174826771952349189?s=20

the tweet is the screen shot i just took for you
okay so, i went on the button that said "look up" and it took me to my GPU that i have in my PCI slot. but why isnt afterburner, invidia, ETC. acknowledge that its there. and it use to tell me the name of the graphics card. not "video controller(VGA compatible)"
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Suggest that you back up a bit.

You are changing too many things and the troubleshooting efforts get muddled ("best case") when that happens.

"Worst case, as you are experiencing, the problems multiply.

Re-reading one of your earlier posts you wrote "But when I run like files explorer for example with chrome after 3 mins it crashed then I have to restart it. "

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes and warnings of any nature. But especially look for any error codes or warnings associated with files explorer, Chrome, and graphics.

Another thing you can do is to boot your system, open either Task Manager or Resource Monitor (one or the other, not both at the same time) and simply watch for awhile. I will quantify "awhile" as watching until the system becomes stable. Nothing really changing. [Note: Process Explorer may be helpful as well.]

Then open, for example, file explorer and watch again. Do likewise with Chrome, then some apps, and finally some games. Do some only one at a time.

And you must also remember that utilities such as GPU-z, CPU-z, etc. are not perfect detectors or indicators of what may be happening. (And I will concede the same with respect to Task Manager and Resource Monitor.)

They are all good tools and can provide useful information and diagnostic details. However, that information must be considered with respect to context and use. The tool may not be able to distinguish between a specific device versus a generic identification. Especially for newer products.

And updates to the OS, applications, and the tools themselves may cause changes; good and bad.

Again, simplify the system, get performance stabilized, and then use the tools to see what is running, what resources are being used, what errors are occurring etc.

Then make one of the desired changes - overclock if you wish. Observe and if all is well, Do the next change on your list.

At some point you may discover a threshold configuration that will become unstable. Then that issue can be addressed and resolved.

The problem must be identified and confirmed before you can start applying solutions.
 
Sep 19, 2019
7
0
10
0
Suggest that you back up a bit.

You are changing too many things and the troubleshooting efforts get muddled ("best case") when that happens.

"Worst case, as you are experiencing, the problems multiply.

Re-reading one of your earlier posts you wrote "But when I run like files explorer for example with chrome after 3 mins it crashed then I have to restart it. "

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes and warnings of any nature. But especially look for any error codes or warnings associated with files explorer, Chrome, and graphics.

Another thing you can do is to boot your system, open either Task Manager or Resource Monitor (one or the other, not both at the same time) and simply watch for awhile. I will quantify "awhile" as watching until the system becomes stable. Nothing really changing. [Note: Process Explorer may be helpful as well.]

Then open, for example, file explorer and watch again. Do likewise with Chrome, then some apps, and finally some games. Do some only one at a time.

And you must also remember that utilities such as GPU-z, CPU-z, etc. are not perfect detectors or indicators of what may be happening. (And I will concede the same with respect to Task Manager and Resource Monitor.)

They are all good tools and can provide useful information and diagnostic details. However, that information must be considered with respect to context and use. The tool may not be able to distinguish between a specific device versus a generic identification. Especially for newer products.

And updates to the OS, applications, and the tools themselves may cause changes; good and bad.

Again, simplify the system, get performance stabilized, and then use the tools to see what is running, what resources are being used, what errors are occurring etc.

Then make one of the desired changes - overclock if you wish. Observe and if all is well, Do the next change on your list.

At some point you may discover a threshold configuration that will become unstable. Then that issue can be addressed and resolved.

The problem must be identified and confirmed before you can start applying solutions.
i looked at the problems on the event list and there are TONS of red marks and yellow marks. this is crazy. im really thinking windows dosnt think that the version of windows is authentic since it has been in my hard drive or already been used? could that be the issue? if so how do i fix this problem. ive tried updating drivers via device manager, and with my MOBO install disc, still didnt work. ive called microsoft, and they said this will help but it didnt
 
Sep 19, 2019
7
0
10
0
Suggest that you back up a bit.

You are changing too many things and the troubleshooting efforts get muddled ("best case") when that happens.

"Worst case, as you are experiencing, the problems multiply.

Re-reading one of your earlier posts you wrote "But when I run like files explorer for example with chrome after 3 mins it crashed then I have to restart it. "

Look in Reliability History and Event Viewer for error codes and warnings of any nature. But especially look for any error codes or warnings associated with files explorer, Chrome, and graphics.

Another thing you can do is to boot your system, open either Task Manager or Resource Monitor (one or the other, not both at the same time) and simply watch for awhile. I will quantify "awhile" as watching until the system becomes stable. Nothing really changing. [Note: Process Explorer may be helpful as well.]

Then open, for example, file explorer and watch again. Do likewise with Chrome, then some apps, and finally some games. Do some only one at a time.

And you must also remember that utilities such as GPU-z, CPU-z, etc. are not perfect detectors or indicators of what may be happening. (And I will concede the same with respect to Task Manager and Resource Monitor.)

They are all good tools and can provide useful information and diagnostic details. However, that information must be considered with respect to context and use. The tool may not be able to distinguish between a specific device versus a generic identification. Especially for newer products.

And updates to the OS, applications, and the tools themselves may cause changes; good and bad.

Again, simplify the system, get performance stabilized, and then use the tools to see what is running, what resources are being used, what errors are occurring etc.

Then make one of the desired changes - overclock if you wish. Observe and if all is well, Do the next change on your list.

At some point you may discover a threshold configuration that will become unstable. Then that issue can be addressed and resolved.

The problem must be identified and confirmed before you can start applying solutions.
Here is stuff you should look at. These are the pictures to refer from. I dont know exactly what to look for in this. But the blue line on CPU is all the way up and stays there. There are also huge spikes in the disk section. https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=1-atEWTMylScYahNRklEFupmxEubu8wnI
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Is Windows authentic? Where did you get it?

Per the two preceding posts.

Red marks and yellow icons: most systems will always have some errors. In fact PC scammers often use those red and yellow marks to panic people into giving the scammer (often purporting to be "Windows" or "Microsoft" ) access the system, money, personal information, or all of the above. And do not ignore information icons either. They may bring something to your attention such as some software being updated and you did not even know the software was installed. Stuff sneaks in all of the time....

There should be some explanation about those errors. You can obtain more information by right-clicking any individual error. Start with most frequently occurring error. Google the error code. Do not expect simple and direct answers about what went wrong with respect to any given error and the time it occurred. Could be some combination of events. Plus many error codes tend to be generic and may appear with any number of problems.

CPU: The first thing I noted was that Cortana is suspended. However there is a very long list of CPU items. You can drag the double line at the bottom of any component window downwards to view, in a fuller context, most of what is consuming the CPU as a resource. You can also sort the data in any given column by clicking the column header. For the most part your CPU appears to just be idling along.

Note the corresponding spikes in Disk, Network, Memory. Looking at the leftmost column I see Ready Boost running, I see One drive trying to do things.

Wondering about TIWorker - seems to appear a lot but I do not know what normal is for that .exe. You can expand each of the four groupings (CPU, Memory, Disk, and Network) to determine if TIWorker is showing up elsewhere.

The other image refers to a problem installing the GTX 1050 Ti driver. Driver could be incorrect for your system, buggy, or corrupted. Go to Nvidia's website to confirm that you have the correct driver. Then download and try installing again. But not immediately.

My first suggestion is to go into Task Manager > Startup and disable apps, utilities, and so forth that do not need to be run when the system is booted. That simplifies/reduces the workload for the CPU.

My second suggestion is to likewise disable features such as One-drive, Cortana,Automatic Updates, indexing, file compression.

Goal continuing to be to simplify everything your system is trying to do. Stop overclocking.

Boot into safemode and observe performance. Determine what errors continue and then address those errors.

Overall I think it is going to take a methodical rebuild and reconfiguration to find and resolve the root problem(s).

No instance answers or fixes that I can see. Hopefully, maybe I have missed something and someone else will see it.

I have no problem with that.
 

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