[SOLVED] PC keeps shutting off! HELP!

Nov 23, 2019
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Hey guys/gals, I'm new to the PC community! Have just built a very budget PC to play around with. Screen goes black and shuts off randomly. GPU was stress tested for 10mins (Furmark) because I thought it was GPU overheating causing it to keep crashing and black screening while playing Borderlands 3. I have a feeling its got something to do with the memory or bios.

Gigabyte ga-ab350m gaming 3
AMD Ryzen 3 2200G
ASUS Cerberus GeForce® GTX 1050 Ti
CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 8GB (2x4GB) DDR4 2666MHz (XMP disabled so its running 2133MHz or something)
Thermaltake 500w
Windows 10(not activated yet)

BIOS ver. F41
NVIDIA Drivers up to date.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Don't put that Litepower PSU back in that system. If you do, you are asking for problems and damaged hardware. It's a pile of crap.

I'm not sure what you bought to replace it is any better though. What is the exact model or series of the Gigabyte PSU you bought?

Also, your PSU should not EVER be plugged into a power strip of any kind unless it is an high end industrial type power strip. Those cheap strips are very problematic and by cheap, I mean anything sold by local home centers, Walmart, Belkin, Monster, sub-20.00 APC, anything branded Amazon, etc.

Your PSU should only EVER be plugged into two possible places. Directly into the power outlet on the wall or into a UPS battery backup. That's it, and that's all. Other things can be plugged into the power strip like your monitor(s), sound equipment, whatever, but don't plug your PSU into any power strip that does is not an industrial type product from APC, Tripp Lite, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric industrial, etc.


Years of experience using PC systems and having to diagnose bushels full of issues that a high number of ended up being faults with the circuitry inside the power strips. Primarily, cheap box store models but also a good number of supposedly premium power strip "surge protectors" that don't actually protect you from anything other than your own fear of what might happen if you actually end up needing a surge protector. A false sense of security.

Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.

Buy a good one, but understand expensive does not equal good.

"Monster" brand are the low end junk that are sold for a premium price. Look for what us professionals use. Tripp-lite is one of my go to absolute favorites as they have a price to quality mix that is exceptional. The Belkin brand is junk as far as I am concerned as they focus on how it looks and not how it works. APC is also another one that I will trust , but they mostly cater to data centers and Corporate.

Lastly, if you really care about your electronics, get a Whole house surge suppressor installed in your electrical panel. Only a few hundred bucks and it protects everything including the overpriced LED lightbulbs that is all the rage these days.
APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip. Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.

Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.

Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.

All models feature an internal protection that will disconnect the surge-protective component at the end of its useful life but will maintain power to the load now unprotected.
I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.

And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.



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Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Is that Thermaltake power supply a TR2?

Are your memory modules installed in the A2 and B2 slots, which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU going left to right starting at the CPU socket and working towards the edge of the motherboard with the fourth slot being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard?

What is the EXACT model of the memory kit you are running?

Did YOU update the BIOS to version F41, and if so did you FIRST update to version F31? If not, I would suggest that you flash version F31 and then after a successful flash THEN flash version F41 or F42d.
 
Nov 23, 2019
6
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10
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Is that Thermaltake power supply a TR2?

Are your memory modules installed in the A2 and B2 slots, which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU going left to right starting at the CPU socket and working towards the edge of the motherboard with the fourth slot being the one closest to the edge of the motherboard?

What is the EXACT model of the memory kit you are running?

Did YOU update the BIOS to version F41, and if so did you FIRST update to version F31? If not, I would suggest that you flash version F31 and then after a successful flash THEN flash version F41 or F42d.
My memory are installed as you suggested. All I know from the memory is that its the DDR4 corsair vengeance LPX 2666MHz, I cant give you any serial# or what else is on the ram since I don't have the PC at the moment. As for BIOS, I have uploaded successfully uploaded F31 and F41 but wasn't successful with F42( I don't know for what reason).
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That's the Litepower 500. Replace it. It is absolute trash.

Also, Corsair's memory finder for your motherboard model does not turn up a 2666mhz 2 x4GB CL16 kit that is compatible with your motherboard, so according to Corsair, that memory kit is not compatible with that board.

Even so, I'd deal with the power supply first because memory compatibility can be hit or miss even based off the memory manufacturers QVL or the motherboard QVL lists.

I would find a good 450w unit from among the models recommended here, if possible:

 
Nov 23, 2019
6
0
10
0
That's the Litepower 500. Replace it. It is absolute trash.

Also, Corsair's memory finder for your motherboard model does not turn up a 2666mhz 2 x4GB CL16 kit that is compatible with your motherboard, so according to Corsair, that memory kit is not compatible with that board.

Even so, I'd deal with the power supply first because memory compatibility can be hit or miss even based off the memory manufacturers QVL or the motherboard QVL lists.

I would find a good 450w unit from among the models recommended here, if possible:

I now have another problem. I can boot up the PC through the usb (bios f42d) but after it boots up and I take the usb out, it cant boot again.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What do you mean "boot up the PC through the USB"?

BIOS updates and flash drives are not boot devices. This makes no sense at all. There is nothing on a firmware containing flash drive that could have anything to do with whether the system could boot or not.

Try doing a hard reset of the BIOS.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 
Nov 23, 2019
6
0
10
0
What do you mean "boot up the PC through the USB"?

BIOS updates and flash drives are not boot devices. This makes no sense at all. There is nothing on a firmware containing flash drive that could have anything to do with whether the system could boot or not.

Try doing a hard reset of the BIOS.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
I've got it! Buddy had it a plugged into the outlet with a 6-port outlet on the wall with a mini fridge and that's might be the issue! Still have no random turn offs yet. I did plug in a new set of ram in it (G. Skill Ripjaws V), but I will be putting the vengeance lpx back to see if there would be any crashes. I did buy another 500w Gigabyte PSU but I don't think i'll be needing that. Will update you tomorrow!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Don't put that Litepower PSU back in that system. If you do, you are asking for problems and damaged hardware. It's a pile of crap.

I'm not sure what you bought to replace it is any better though. What is the exact model or series of the Gigabyte PSU you bought?

Also, your PSU should not EVER be plugged into a power strip of any kind unless it is an high end industrial type power strip. Those cheap strips are very problematic and by cheap, I mean anything sold by local home centers, Walmart, Belkin, Monster, sub-20.00 APC, anything branded Amazon, etc.

Your PSU should only EVER be plugged into two possible places. Directly into the power outlet on the wall or into a UPS battery backup. That's it, and that's all. Other things can be plugged into the power strip like your monitor(s), sound equipment, whatever, but don't plug your PSU into any power strip that does is not an industrial type product from APC, Tripp Lite, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric industrial, etc.


Years of experience using PC systems and having to diagnose bushels full of issues that a high number of ended up being faults with the circuitry inside the power strips. Primarily, cheap box store models but also a good number of supposedly premium power strip "surge protectors" that don't actually protect you from anything other than your own fear of what might happen if you actually end up needing a surge protector. A false sense of security.

Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.

Buy a good one, but understand expensive does not equal good.

"Monster" brand are the low end junk that are sold for a premium price. Look for what us professionals use. Tripp-lite is one of my go to absolute favorites as they have a price to quality mix that is exceptional. The Belkin brand is junk as far as I am concerned as they focus on how it looks and not how it works. APC is also another one that I will trust , but they mostly cater to data centers and Corporate.

Lastly, if you really care about your electronics, get a Whole house surge suppressor installed in your electrical panel. Only a few hundred bucks and it protects everything including the overpriced LED lightbulbs that is all the rage these days.
APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip. Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.

Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.

Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.

All models feature an internal protection that will disconnect the surge-protective component at the end of its useful life but will maintain power to the load now unprotected.
I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.

And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.



.
 
Last edited:
Nov 23, 2019
6
0
10
0
Don't put that Litepower PSU back in that system. If you do, you are asking for problems and damaged hardware. It's a pile of crap.

I'm not sure what you bought to replace it is any better though. What is the exact model or series of the Gigabyte PSU you bought?

Also, your PSU should not EVER be plugged into a power strip of any kind unless it is an high end industrial type power strip. Those cheap strips are very problematic and by cheap, I mean anything sold by local home centers, Walmart, Belkin, Monster, sub-20.00 APC, anything branded Amazon, etc.

Your PSU should only EVER be plugged into two possible places. Directly into the power outlet on the wall or into a UPS battery backup. That's it, and that's all. Other things can be plugged into the power strip like your monitor(s), sound equipment, whatever, but don't plug your PSU into any power strip that does is not an industrial type product from APC, Tripp Lite, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric industrial, etc.


Years of experience using PC systems and having to diagnose bushels full of issues that a high number of ended up being faults with the circuitry inside the power strips. Primarily, cheap box store models but also a good number of supposedly premium power strip "surge protectors" that don't actually protect you from anything other than your own fear of what might happen if you actually end up needing a surge protector. A false sense of security.

Most people buy and use power strips because they THINK that the fact it says surge protector means something. Usually, it doesn't. This is one of my favorite quotes on the subject from an electrical engineer and residential/commercial electrical journeyman I know.



APC, Tripp-Lite, Leviton, Eaton, Leviton, General Electric, Polyphaser, Ditek, Siemens, ABB, Square D, Intermatic, Cutler-Hammer (Eaton), and Syscom, these are the brands you can trust to have high quality internal electronics if you MUST use a power strip. Do not however use a power strip thinking that it offers significant protection, because even the best of them does not, not really. Whole house protection is the only real protection from surges.

Monster and Belkin, and a few others that are commonly used, almost unilaterally use the same protections in their 45 dollar surge protector strips as what you would find in an 8 dollar Amazon or Walmart branded model. And if you ever take one of these, or any cheap box store, dollar store (Even worse than these others usually BUT occasionally about the same) or Harbor Freight power strip apart you are likely to find frayed wires, poorly soldered connections with blobs of solder nearly touching crucial and potential short circuit points, super low quality MOVs, and a ton of other indicators that no real integrity was involved in the design or manufacturer of these units.

Another factor to keep in mind is that even with some of these high quality units, any protection that MIGHT be afforded, is usually the end of that product after one shot. This, directly from the Tripp-Lite manual for the #1 selling surge protection power strip in the world.



I believe many models from APC and a couple of the others I listed have now incorporated designs that permanently disengage any ability of the device to deliver power once a surge or short of significant enough caliber to incur the protection has occured. That basically means once there has been a surge or short, throw the device away. Even for high end models. Only whole house protection and properly earthed circuits offer any true protection from a serious surge or direct strike from lightning somewhere close enough to affect your segment of the grid.

And whatever you do, don't EVER buy any kind of extension cord, power strip or other electronic device with slip rings.



.
https://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX77510 is the one I got. And thanks for the info! Gonna have to do some moving around for outlets.
 

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