Question Pc monitor won't turn on after installing new gpu!

Allen_22

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specifically an rx580. My previous gpu was also from ATI. Anyway i put the gpu into the slot correctly, i connect it to my psu. I try to open the pc, but although everything is spinning as it's supposed to, the monitor will not react. I made sure to connect the monitor cable with the gpu as normal.
The keyboard lights flash for a few seconds and then nothing. For instance pressins CAPS lock will not turn on the corresponding light.

Just to make sure i was not doing anything wrong, i reconnected my old gpu and it works. My psu has more than enough watts to support my new card.

Does anyone have any idea about what might be causing this? Is it possible that the new gpu itsself is damaged?
 

PC Tailor

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Please post your entire system spec including PSU make and model.
Does plugging the old GPU back in work normally?
Did you clear any previous drivers using DDU before installing the new GPU?
What was your old GPU?
 
Aug 8, 2019
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My friend had a very simmilar experience with his new GPU, where his Monitor didn't show any output and the lights on his keyboard only flashed. It was due to a faulty PSU, even tho it was enough to meet the requirements it was quite old.

Since your old GPU was an ATI, im going to assume it was without an external power source and was only powered from the 75w provided by the Motherboard, in this case your PSU just isn't strong enough.

If you indeed had Pins that were needed to power the GPU, it could be an indicator that your PSU is faulty as previously stated.

I recommend getting a new PSU. The Problem my friend was faceing was quickly fixed by getting a new one.
 
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Allen_22

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My friend had a very simmilar experience with his new GPU, where his Monitor didn't show any output and the lights on his keyboard only flashed. It was due to a faulty PSU, even tho it was enough to meet the requirements it was quite old.

Since your old GPU was an ATI, im going to assume it was without an external power source and was only powered from the 75w provided by the Motherboard, in this case your PSU just isn't strong enough.

If you indeed had Pins that were needed to power the GPU, it could be an indicator that your PSU is faulty as previously stated.

I recommend getting a new PSU. The Problem my friend was faceing was quickly fixed by getting a new one.
No, i definitely have an external power source. Either 500 or 550 watts, can't remember the exact number.
The brand is "cooler master"
 

Allen_22

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Please post your entire system spec including PSU make and model.
Does plugging the old GPU back in work normally?
Did you clear any previous drivers using DDU before installing the new GPU?
What was your old GPU?
Like i said in my first post, yes, the old one works correctly. My psu is coolermaster, one with either 500 or 550 watts, at any rate i remember researching whether it is enough for the new card and the answer was yes
 

PC Tailor

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No, i definitely have an external power source. Either 500 or 550 watts, can't remember the exact number.
The brand is "cooler master"
Brand doesn't make a difference with PSUs unfortunately. And even worse, Cooler Master make a lot of really bad units. The worst probably being the Elite series.

Do you know what exact model it is?
 

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Like i said in my first post, yes, the old one works correctly. My psu is coolermaster, one with either 500 or 550 watts, at any rate i remember researching whether it is enough for the new card and the answer was yes
I understand that - but Wattage doesn't make a difference if the quality is poor - see point 1 here: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/top-not-as-obvious-mistakes-made-when-selecting-parts-for-a-custom-pc.3510178/

Power supplies deteriorate and poor ones create instability and fault quicker.
 
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Aug 8, 2019
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Sorry for poorly wording it,
By "external power source" I meant if your old GPU was powered by and Pins, not if you had a PSU.

As stated previously the Brand doesn't really make a diffrence. I think your PSU is either old or broken. You can get cheap 550 Watt ones at amazon for around 20€ (depending on where you live but I dont recommend cheaping out on a PSU, since if it is bad again, nothing will work. Look around and see what you can find, there are a lot of quality Brands out there, like be quiet! or Corsair.
 

Allen_22

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I understand that - but Wattage doesn't make a difference if the quality is poor - see point 1 here: https://forums.tomshardware.com/threads/top-not-as-obvious-mistakes-made-when-selecting-parts-for-a-custom-pc.3510178/

Power supplies deteriorate and poor ones create instability and fault quicker.
i bought that psu less than 2 years ago, i assumed it would still work. At any rate, my old gpu(the one i am currently forced to use) has a requirement of 450 watts , just 50 below the rx 580. You'd think that if it had detoriated so much, my old card would also not work.

But it does.
 

PC Tailor

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i bought that psu less than 2 years ago, i assumed it would still work. At any rate, my old gpu(the one i am currently forced to use) has a requirement of 450 watts , just 50 below the rx 580. You'd think that if it had detoriated so much, my old card would also not work.

But it does.
I'm just trying to help my friend.

50W can make a big difference on a PSU with an unstable output. You only need 50W extra to pull, and it anything outside of a 5% fluctuation on any of your rails can cause issues. 50W is still a lot in GPU terms, and you can often find it's under higher strain that poor quality PSUs begin to fault.

We're all volunteers just trying to help, and it's a case of methodically eliminating the culprits. The first of which should be the PSU. Poor quality PSUs can deteriorate a LOT in just 2 years.

Have you considered the other options:
  • Did you clear all previous drivers using DDU?
  • Do you have latest BIOS installed?
 

Allen_22

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I'm just trying to help my friend.

50W can make a big difference on a PSU with an unstable output. You only need 50W extra to pull, and it anything outside of a 5% fluctuation on any of your rails can cause issues. 50W is still a lot in GPU terms, and you can often find it's under higher strain that poor quality PSUs begin to fault.

We're all volunteers just trying to help, and it's a case of methodically eliminating the culprits. The first of which should be the PSU. Poor quality PSUs can deteriorate a LOT in just 2 years.

Have you considered the other options:
  • Did you clear all previous drivers using DDU?
  • Do you have latest BIOS installed?
I think i used the uninstaller provided by AMD.
Would the 50 psu be enough to cause the monitor to literally not open?
 

PC Tailor

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I think i used the uninstaller provided by AMD.
Would the 50 psu be enough to cause the monitor to literally not open?
It certainly can, IF the PSU is malfunctioning. So the Cooler Master B series is a poor quality unit, so it certainly could be a culprit, and even if it wasn't if you've had it for 2 years, it only hold a 3 year warranty, which in PSU terms, is basically how long they suspect the PSU to live for.

I've had the B series cause numerous problems in the past.

So if the previous GPU works, which could mean either the new GPU is faulty, or the new GPU power draw is causing the PSU to fault, which commonly occurs. Best test would be to put the GPU into another PC and see if it works.

Did you buy the RX580 new?
 

Allen_22

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It certainly can, IF the PSU is malfunctioning. So the Cooler Master B series is a poor quality unit, so it certainly could be a culprit, and even if it wasn't if you've had it for 2 years, it only hold a 3 year warranty, which in PSU terms, is basically how long they suspect the PSU to live for.

I've had the B series cause numerous problems in the past.

So if the previous GPU works, which could mean either the new GPU is faulty, or the new GPU power draw is causing the PSU to fault, which commonly occurs. Best test would be to put the GPU into another PC and see if it works.

Did you buy the RX580 new?
Yes, brand new.

By the way lately, had some problems with my pc. Every now and then my will just freeze, for no reason. Nothing to do but manually restart. I am sure my hard drive is not the problem, because i had it changed anyway.

Do you think it is a psu issue? In that case it all makes sense. Maybe it only worked marginally wit hthe old gpu and the the new one is too much for it
 

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Yes, brand new.

By the way lately, had some problems with my pc. Every now and then my will just freeze, for no reason. Nothing to do but manually restart. I am sure my hard drive is not the problem, because i had it changed anyway.

Do you think it is a psu issue? In that case it all makes sense. Maybe it only worked marginally wit hthe old gpu and the the new one is too much for it
Poor quality PSUs can also cause random freezing. Just depends.
I would initially say for freezing look at Drivers > RAM > Storage.

But tying it in with your latest problem, and it could well be the PSU. Regardless, a PSU upgrade will certainly protect your components in the future and give some security. So even if you did go down this route and it wasn't the PSU, you're not losing out.
 
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Allen_22

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Poor quality PSUs can also cause random freezing. Just depends.
I would initially say for freezing look at Drivers > RAM > Storage.

But tying it in with your latest problem, and it could well be the PSU. Regardless, a PSU upgrade will certainly protect your components in the future and give some security. So even if you did go down this route and it wasn't the PSU, you're not losing out.
How do i know a good psu from a bad one anyway? Do i buy the most expensive one(within reason), at a certain wattage?
 

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How do i know a good psu from a bad one anyway? Do i buy the most expensive one(within reason), at a certain wattage?
Technically to know the full difference, it requires a lot of research from reputable sources like jonnyguru who do indepth analysis, but as a quick reference guide, you can use something like this: https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/1045610-new-psu-tier-list/
If the PSU model isn't on that list, you might find it on the legacy version (linked in the post), If it's nowhere to be seen, then you can probably deduce that the PSU is either poor quality, or hasn't been tested.

Basically if you go by that list, don't go below Tier B. the Corsair CX is usually the most budget friendly but still decent enough quality PSU on the market in most places.

I personally have a Seasonic FOCUS Plus Gold. In my location, you tend to find the higher end Antec' and be quiet! PSUs are twice as much for the same quality.
 
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digitalgriffin

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No, i definitely have an external power source. Either 500 or 550 watts, can't remember the exact number.
The brand is "cooler master"
Okay so you have the PCIe cable hooked up. Make sure it's snug at both ends, and if it's 8 pin that all 8 pins are in.

Next make sure your 4 pin CPU and MB Power header cable are securely in. Some models (like MSI Armor) pull 75 Watts from the mainboard.
 

digitalgriffin

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You can never go wrong with seasonic, and a lot of higher end brands like corsair rebadge seasonic units. But as always, find a model you like, then google the review results. Toms/[H]/Johnny Guru all do excellent work in this regard.
 

Allen_22

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UPDATE:
So, to make a long story short, i made 100% sure that my new gpu is not damaged or otherwise unworking.
But i still don't know exactly what in my system makes it unresponsive.
Given that my previous gpu works on it, i imagine there is no chance that my motherboard is at fault, right?
 

digitalgriffin

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UPDATE:
So, to make a long story short, i made 100% sure that my new gpu is not damaged or otherwise unworking.
But i still don't know exactly what in my system makes it unresponsive.
Given that my previous gpu works on it, i imagine there is no chance that my motherboard is at fault, right?
Did you put your old graphics card back in and retest it?
 

Allen_22

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Did you put your old graphics card back in and retest it?
Yes, my old gpu works perfectly well. I am using it right now.

I used the new gpu at a friend's house and it worked on his pc. Unfortunately due to time constraints(he was kinda busy leaving for vacations) i could not test precisely which component of my pc interferes with the new gpu.
 

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Yes, my old gpu works perfectly well. I am using it right now.

I used the new gpu at a friend's house and it worked on his pc. Unfortunately due to time constraints(he was kinda busy leaving for vacations) i could not test precisely which component of my pc interferes with the new gpu.
Not as likely that the motherboard is the culprit, this is much more a sign of a faulty PSU when the previous GPU is lower power or a firmware problem.

Did you say you have latest BIOS installed?
 

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