Question Pc noob wanting help with upgrades

The first obvious question would be why you purchased something that didn't meet your needs in the first place?

To be more helpful.
More than likely you have one stick of RAM and it's slow. Ryzen benefits greatly from having fast RAM and dual channel will be super helpful. Something along the lines of GSkill Ripjaws 2x8 should be ~$70-ish.

Get an SSD or M.2 for your OS. This is, immediately, even more important than the RAM. That HDD is crippling your perceived performance. No new system should be running these for OS any more. Even an inexpensive SSD will help a lot. I think something ~$40-50 price range should work fine and use your HDD for storage.

You should consider something like a 1050ti/1650, something like that. You might have to consider your PSU as well.

Just by looks I see cooling issues being present with the case. I would not look to significantly upgrade the CPU/GPU in this same case. I believe online reviews will back that thought.

All of what is mentioned is VERY easy. A YouTube video or quick read away.
 
Reactions: Irish Jokerr
Nov 15, 2020
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This is my first gaming pc but playing cod or gta isnt that important just was wondering what it would take to play them if i decided to give them a try but thanks for the info and advice will be looking into it soon
 
How easy would it be for someone with absolutly no experience with pcs to do these upgrades
With any manner of mechanical ability and "common sense" the removal and install aspect of all of these components is pretty easy. The components themselves have keyed connections and only go in the way they go in.
The hardest aspect is going to be getting the OS swapped and such. There is a great tutorial about that aspect here on the forums.
As mentioned above, there are YouTube videos on everything, and perhaps even on doing these specific things with the exact computer case you listed.

RAM swap is the easiest. The GPU swap is about the same but a tiny bit more involved.
 
Reactions: Irish Jokerr

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
I would return that thing and get something else instead of buying a system and already looking to change components in it. Especially in a pre-built that will have lower end parts in it like a low quality power supply. You should take that $500 and use it towards building one yourself from parts, I'm sure you have relatives or friends that built computers before and there are tons of build suggestions on the forums. I looked at what WalMart sells and there is really nothing worth the money I see on there. Too many of them use custom parts or put the money towards lights instead of good parts and specs. Spending an extra $100 on RGB lights to get a weak CPU and cheap power supply won't do anyone good. By the time you spend almost $200 on a decent video card for 1080 gaming, another $160 on a CPU that will be good for modern games, maybe upgrade the RAM to 16 GB, put in a solid state drive which every modern system should have, you would have added up to a much better built system with better parts. All the extra changes will add up to $400 to make the system a decent gaming one. Spending that 700-900 in the first place will get a much better system if using parts you bought yourself.
 
Nov 15, 2020
8
0
10
0
I would return that thing and get something else instead of buying a system and already looking to change components in it. Especially in a pre-built that will have lower end parts in it like a low quality power supply. You should take that $500 and use it towards building one yourself from parts, I'm sure you have relatives or friends that built computers before and there are tons of build suggestions on the forums. I looked at what WalMart sells and there is really nothing worth the money I see on there. Too many of them use custom parts or put the money towards lights instead of good parts and specs. Spending an extra $100 on RGB lights to get a weak CPU and cheap power supply won't do anyone good. By the time you spend almost $200 on a decent video card for 1080 gaming, another $160 on a CPU that will be good for modern games, maybe upgrade the RAM to 16 GB, put in a solid state drive which every modern system should have, you would have added up to a much better built system with better parts. All the extra changes will add up to $400 to make the system a decent gaming one. Spending that 700-900 in the first place will get a much better system if using parts you bought yourself.
No one in my family or any friends that i know of has ever even owned a gaming pc but i will most likely return that ibuypower and get this one as a starter pc instead seems 2 be a better option than the other https://www.walmart.com/ip/HP-Pavilion-Gaming-R5-1650-Super-8GB-256GB-Gaming-Desktop-Tower/943933730?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&&adid=22222222228364691668&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=m&wl3=471706180795&wl4=aud-834279575886:pla-997876131514&wl5=9010207&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=online&wl12=943933730&veh=sem&gclid=Cj0KCQiA48j9BRC-ARIsAMQu3WQZJjNfac3s4rgv4_MXk3t9dO_ocMaIZ6ptygzmuOhwycNyThQNejMaAvVdEALw_wcB
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
That is a better system but the issue with it is that it looks to be pretty proprietary, which means upgrades will be harder to do, especially to the power supply if you ever want a faster video card that uses more power. If you are sure you won't ever want to upgrade it it would be OK, but spending that much on a system where you can't pick out the parts and does not use open standards is not the best idea.
 

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