[SOLVED] PC not shutting down unless power button is held or PC is unplugged

wildhockey4057

Honorable
Apr 25, 2014
55
0
10,630
0
So when this first started it took about 10 minutes for my computer to turn on which was very strange since it normally takes a maximum of 20 seconds. That night I went to shut it down and it simply wouldn't turn off unless I held the power button. The next day it took around 20 minutes to turn on and let me type my password. That night I clicked shut down and waited to see what would happen. After another long 15 minutes the computer finally went into the shut down screen and the monitors turned off, but the computer sat for over an hour and didn't turn off completely. Now it's the same thing every time I test it and it is driving me insane. I've checked for updates, turned off fast boot in the control panel, and closed down all programs running before shutting down. Nothing has changed a thing so far. I thought about reverting back to a later date, but I haven't even installed anything recently so I feel like that wouldn't even do anything. If anyone has any ideas I'd love to hear them!

System specs:
  • Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Pro WiFi
  • i5 9600k
  • Noctua NDH-15
  • NVIDIA 2080 Super
  • WD HDD (storage)
  • Samsung 860 EVO (OS)
  • EVGA 850w SuperNova
P.S. This has been running great for about 6 months since I built it until now.
 

prince_xaine

Reputable
In my opinion, there are a few things that could be the issue. Always try to fix on the software end before trying hardware. This can save you a lot of money in the long run.

1. Try running Windows in safe mode (with networking). This is to rule out conflicts with software and drivers, as this loads the bare minimum. If it does load faster, you might want to try running a Virus Scan and/or installing/re-installing drivers, and/or uninstalling software from the control panel.

2. Corrupted Windows: Open up a elevated command prompt and run this tool "dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth" without quotes. It will search for any damaged files and repair them. Then see if your computer shuts down or reboots any quicker.

3. Try System Restore. Sometimes this is all you need to get windows running normally again. Though if the DISM tool didn't work, I don't think this will either, but it's worth a shot before the next step.

4. Try reinstalling Windows. This will entirely rule out software. You could skip the other steps and save some time, but I feel a lot of people don't like re-installing Windows if they don't have to. Personally, if my computer starts facing issues and the DISM tool doesn't fix it, I just skip to this step.

5. If the last step didn't work, you probably should start looking into the hardware, most importantly, your SSD. If you have another SSD, I'd recommend trying to install Windows into that. If you don't have another SSD, you could try installing to the HDD instead (temporarily of course) to see if the issue persists. Otherwise, it could point to something more serious such as memory or motherboard failure.
 

prince_xaine

Reputable
In my opinion, there are a few things that could be the issue. Always try to fix on the software end before trying hardware. This can save you a lot of money in the long run.

1. Try running Windows in safe mode (with networking). This is to rule out conflicts with software and drivers, as this loads the bare minimum. If it does load faster, you might want to try running a Virus Scan and/or installing/re-installing drivers, and/or uninstalling software from the control panel.

2. Corrupted Windows: Open up a elevated command prompt and run this tool "dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth" without quotes. It will search for any damaged files and repair them. Then see if your computer shuts down or reboots any quicker.

3. Try System Restore. Sometimes this is all you need to get windows running normally again. Though if the DISM tool didn't work, I don't think this will either, but it's worth a shot before the next step.

4. Try reinstalling Windows. This will entirely rule out software. You could skip the other steps and save some time, but I feel a lot of people don't like re-installing Windows if they don't have to. Personally, if my computer starts facing issues and the DISM tool doesn't fix it, I just skip to this step.

5. If the last step didn't work, you probably should start looking into the hardware, most importantly, your SSD. If you have another SSD, I'd recommend trying to install Windows into that. If you don't have another SSD, you could try installing to the HDD instead (temporarily of course) to see if the issue persists. Otherwise, it could point to something more serious such as memory or motherboard failure.
 

wildhockey4057

Honorable
Apr 25, 2014
55
0
10,630
0
In my opinion, there are a few things that could be the issue. Always try to fix on the software end before trying hardware. This can save you a lot of money in the long run.

1. Try running Windows in safe mode (with networking). This is to rule out conflicts with software and drivers, as this loads the bare minimum. If it does load faster, you might want to try running a Virus Scan and/or installing/re-installing drivers, and/or uninstalling software from the control panel.

2. Corrupted Windows: Open up a elevated command prompt and run this tool "dism /online /cleanup-image /restorehealth" without quotes. It will search for any damaged files and repair them. Then see if your computer shuts down or reboots any quicker.

3. Try System Restore. Sometimes this is all you need to get windows running normally again. Though if the DISM tool didn't work, I don't think this will either, but it's worth a shot before the next step.

4. Try reinstalling Windows. This will entirely rule out software. You could skip the other steps and save some time, but I feel a lot of people don't like re-installing Windows if they don't have to. Personally, if my computer starts facing issues and the DISM tool doesn't fix it, I just skip to this step.

5. If the last step didn't work, you probably should start looking into the hardware, most importantly, your SSD. If you have another SSD, I'd recommend trying to install Windows into that. If you don't have another SSD, you could try installing to the HDD instead (temporarily of course) to see if the issue persists. Otherwise, it could point to something more serious such as memory or motherboard failure.
I will give that all a try and come back with an update. Thank you for the suggestions!
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY