Question PC not supporting Windows 11

Dec 11, 2020
5
0
10
0
Hey! I downloaded Microsoft's computer checkup tool to see if my pc supports Windows 11, and it says that it doesn't.

My pc is way better than the requirements for Windows 11.
 
Dec 11, 2020
5
0
10
0
I looked it up, and my motherboard's webiste says that I have 1 TPM header, however when I go into the windows + r tpm panel, it says that I don't have one
 
Dec 11, 2020
5
0
10
0
Hey, I found it!
Anyone wondering why theirs isn't working!
Your motherboard either doesn't support it (look it up) Or it isn't turned on in the bios. After some digging you'll find the option for it in the bios! :D
 

BMoshier

Distinguished
Jan 23, 2014
23
0
18,520
1
What is TPM 2.0? Why does Microsoft (windows 11) need it more than Windows 10 needs not to become hacker's dreamland? (No support after 2025 for Windows 10.)
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
Jun 25, 2021
11
0
10
0
I've also read that a lot of people (myself included) are getting "Not supported" even though you meet both soft and hard floors. I believe the PC Health app needs an update.
 

RockyTW

Honorable
Mar 11, 2016
2
1
10,515
0
Yup.
Checked the approved CPU list and my Inspiron's i7-8550 was on the list, but my laptop failed the W 11 PC Health Check test. I googled TPM setting or some such.
I had to go into BIOS and turn off legacy BIOS
still failed the test
Went back to & changed Changed to another setting back to UEFI
still failed
went back to BIOS into security settings, I didn't find a "TPM setting" but something that seemed similar, under security, so I checked Platform Trust Technology (Intel PTT) and rebooted.
I ran the Health Check a third time and now it passes, says Im ready for W 11

TPM 2.0. Does your motherboard supports it? And has it enabled? Because if not then the tool will say nope.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: FlBirm

ginandbacon

Commendable
Aug 22, 2019
9
1
1,515
0
Most PC's built around 2011/2012 should be supported in regards to just TPM and Secure Boot. Most people forget, MS initially tried to make Secure Boot a requirement for Windows 8.1 but backed down due to user complaints. Secure Boot is based on Sony's rootkit software they put on CDs/Digital Media (which Sony got a lot of heat for at the time). The biggest issue for most users is the CPU compatibility list. It seems like VBS is the deciding factor, and a particular version (earlier CPU's with VBS aren't supported) although I wish MS would just come out and confirm this. Virtual Based Security is required, it allows the OS to sandbox programs similar to how tabs are sandboxed in modern browsers. While you can still install it on an unsupported CPU, people have found that it runs slower on an unsupported CPU then the same hardware on Windows 10. This seems to be the main driving force of supported CPU's. Also, and purely speculation by me as I have nothing to back this up, but if you looks at the list of CPU's effected by SPECTRE and MELTDOWN, and the supported CPU's for Windows 11, they are pretty much identical. Makes me wonder if there was more to those two vulnerabilities then what was publicly known. Just speculation, nothing more. The video below explains it pretty well, MS should have been more clear about this when they announced the requirements. While people complain over Secure Boot and TMP, they most likely have it, it just has to be turned on in the BIOS. The problem is, average users don't even know what the BIOS is, or what half this terminology means and MS's inability to be clear about it has just made things worse.

View: https://youtu.be/_xqbp0w5fJ4?t=178


https://www.zdnet.com/article/ok-microsoft-you-win-im-buying-a-windows-11-pc/

Now, with this required hardware-enforced containerization and virtualization tech, Windows 11 will isolate applications and processes much more easily. It will be much more difficult for malware in an errantly running application to access resources it isn't supposed to. It will only access the resources in that specific application task that it infects, such as a particular browser tab.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
The problem is hardware makers didn't pull finger out and turn on features in BIOS that, as you say, Microsoft had wanted since win 8.1. And which are in many BIOS but users don't know what BIOS is. Whose fault is that?

So Microsoft had given them 10 years and they still weren't moving towards the secure platform that MS wanted.

Only way to force hardware makers to move was to stick to the security story and make users turn to the hardware makers as Users aren't to blame here, its hardware makers. Users just meat in sandwich and they don't know who to blame. MS doesn't want to point at hardware partners they want to keep playing with. So its a lot of smoke and mirrors.

So people blame MIcrosoft, because they are easy targets. Truth is a little more murky

MS isn't creating E Waste, thats all the Hardware makers who knew what had been asked for and decided to ignore it anyway. There are PC made in last year that can't get 11. That isn't MS fault, thats on the makers.
 
Reactions: ginandbacon

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
144,713
8,685
175,340
22,582
The problem is, average users don't even know what the BIOS is, or what half this terminology means and MS's inability to be clear about it has just made things worse.
'the average user' neither knows nor cares what Windows version is on their system.

By the time Win 10 falls off support, they will have bought a new system that came with Win 11.
Someone running a system from pre-2017...that system will be 8 years old by the time Win 10 dies in 2025.
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
people over reacted. They saw 11 and thought OMG I need that NOW even though
  1. its no different to 10
  2. 10 works fine right now
  3. its not going anywhere
many of the new features of 11 are already in 10
  1. DirectX ultimate. been there since May last year
  2. Direct Storage... coming soon. its not in 11 yet either
  3. WIndows Terminal. Combines CMD & Powershell. Its on the store for 10 now.
or they aren't even in 11 yet.
1. Android integration. Not until next year

Windows 11 was a lot of smoke and mirrors. I been using it 6 weeks now. Its not worth throwing a PC away NOW just to get. Trust me, a few days/weeks into using it you will wonder why you made such a fuss (unless the "new" fuzzy feeling lasts longer and you only start to notice its the same after a month or so)
 

Colif

Win 10 Master
Moderator
GHIN Syndrome.
Yep. Hype over powered rational thought.

Where I was looking for "whats new" most couldn't see past the interface changes. It still hard to find actual changes, I know there are some. But articles just talk about visuals and although its most obvious if you run desktop in 720p to make the transitions pop, its not so clear at 1440p, and not something memorable. Its like a lot of 11, I only think of it when trying to think of differences.

There isn't much there to say "This is a reason to get it now" "You can't live without this" No must haves besides its NEW
 

ginandbacon

Commendable
Aug 22, 2019
9
1
1,515
0
The problem is hardware makers didn't pull finger out and turn on features in BIOS that, as you say, Microsoft had wanted since win 8.1. And which are in many BIOS but users don't know what BIOS is. Whose fault is that?

So Microsoft had given them 10 years and they still weren't moving towards the secure platform that MS wanted.
Completely agree. My nuc meets the hardware requirements so I'm running 11 although I disabled bit locker, which was only enabled as my OS drive. I still had to turn TPM and secure boot on in the BIOS. I was dual booting and wanted to get rid of the second OS so I disabled bit locker, deleted the partition and the recovery partition for 2nd OS. I wasn't able to expand the C drive using disk management so I did it with another utility. I happened to do some disk mark tests before enabling bit locker. On my sabrent Q4 rocker gen 4 nvme drive I was getting 4600/MB/s read and 2200MB/s write constantly on sequential 1MB read/writes. After enabling bit locker again, there were 2 options, current data or entire disk. I chose entire disk. After that read speed dropped to 3500MB/s and write would start at 1900MB/s but after a while would drop to 550MB/s and it was noticable on large file copies. So, I have TPM 2.0 bit without BL enabled it is pointless. Personally, I believe it should be up to hard drive manufacturer's to have native hardware encryption as hardware based encryption is better then software based. Based off my research hard drive manufacturer's just can't be trusted to do so so so that's why MS is enabling BL by default in 11. Had hardware makers stepped up earlier then none of this would be an issue. People only get mad of they have to change something. If hardware makers had enabled TPM and Secure Boot, it would be a mute point outside the CPU compatibility list.

The biggest changes to 11 is by far security (even though TPM and secure boot are not new) and I'm pretty positive ransomware is the driving force behind that and why VBS is required (at least a specific version). To isolate apps from each other, which causes 11 to run slower on an unsupported CPU so better off to stick with 10.

It's usually cheaper to pay unless you have good security and at least one security expert if you're a business. Particularly due to the fact that it often takes months to get access to key systems so you have to find when you were infected, but if it's months a lot of backups are already infected. Anyone with such bad security that it went unnoticed for months is not going to be able to get current data back that isn't already compromised. I work for a software company that sells software to state DOT's. Both Colorado and Georgia got his with the same ransomware. Colorado paid, Georgia didn't. Colorado paid 5 million and was back up and running. Georgia ended up spending over 20 million and it took months to get things back to normal. The DOD has required TPM and Secure Boot for all computers for quote some time.

I was talking to the head of our IT at work. Someone clicked a link they shouldn't. Within 5 minutes multiple people were notified via text and email about being hit by ransomware and restored everything to 5 minutes before it happened and never looked back.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY