PC Not Turning Back On

natelelder

Reputable
Nov 11, 2015
3
0
4,510
0
My friend recently unplugged his PC to rearrange his room and then plugged it in an hour later and it did not turn on at all. I came over to his house to check it out and tried all the basic things like different outlets and all sorts of things like that. Then I took out his GPU, still didnt work. No lights or not even the slightest bit of sound comes from anywhere in the PC. I have dealt with issues similar to this before and tried everything I tried then and it still didn’t work. I just don’t understand how it could work and then not work when plugged back in like an hour later. He did not open the case or touch anything inside at all. Anyone please recommend me ideas as to what it may be. One thing I did notice about his PC is that it is dusty as hell. I’m not sure this has to do with the issue since it has been that way for a while but I do know dust can affect it. Anything to help please let me know. Thanks.
 

mdark690

Prominent
Nov 26, 2017
51
0
640
2
Dust can effect an computer but depends how much dust is in the computer and has it been cleaned!. The Powersurply have you checked to see if you not switched it off from the back?

From Google!

Dust is a problem from the standpoint of blocking fan vents, or, if deep enough, actually insulating parts, causing overheating, but unless it contains substantial amounts of corrosive or conductive material (in which case you shouldn't be breathing it), it won't damage the electrical components (beyond any overheating.


Check this thread out might work

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answers/id-2449612/computer-turn-unplugged.html
 

mdark690

Prominent
Nov 26, 2017
51
0
640
2
Dust can effect an computer but depends how much dust is in the computer and has it been cleaned!. The Powersurply have you checked to see if you not switched it off from the back?

From Google!

Dust is a problem from the standpoint of blocking fan vents, or, if deep enough, actually insulating parts, causing overheating, but unless it contains substantial amounts of corrosive or conductive material (in which case you shouldn't be breathing it), it won't damage the electrical components (beyond any overheating.


Check this thread out might work

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answers/id-2449612/computer-turn-unplugged.html
 

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