Question PC not turning on after shutdown

Oct 4, 2020
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Hi.

My PC has been giving me absolutely no issues until now.

I was playing my usual games and when I was off to bed I shutdown my PC, nothing out of the ordinary, but when I came to switch it on the next day, I pressed the power button and nothing happened.

The light on my motherboard is on when plugged in, so as far as I know my PSU is still drawing power, but I have read that doesn't necessarily mean that the PSU still works.

I've cheched and double checked all the obvious solutions. The PSU is a Huntkey LW-6550HG 550W, and my other specs are as follows:
Ryzen 3 2200g (no overclock)
1x 8gb 2666mhz RAM
XFX Rx570
Asus Prime a320m-k motherboard

I bought the PSU second hand in 2013, not sure how long the previous owner had it for, so it is at least 7 years old.

I haven't been able to narrow it down to the PSU being the cause, but I'm assuming it is because of its age. I bought the motherboard, CPU, GPU, and RAM last year so those are still relatively new. Has the PSU finally drawn its last breath or could it be something else?
 

PC Tailor

Judicious
Ambassador
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Huntkey LW-6550HG 550W
Oh dear. Sorry to say, but unfortunately that PSU is probably a more effective door stop than a PSU! Especially with it being that old. Even if it isn't causing your issue, I'd replace it ASAP before anything worse potentially happens.

The PSU is actually a very poor 400W with a 550W sticker on it. And is very likely the cause of your issues. Even if it isn't, you'll need to replace it IMO. Not just because of it's age, but because of the PSU itself.
 
Reactions: Archaic59
Oct 4, 2020
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Okay so I did a Jumpstart on my PSU using the paperclip method and it's working 100%, so as far as I'm aware it's 1 of 3 things: A dead motherboard, dead CPU or the power buttons on the case itself aren't working. Personally I think damage to the power buttons are more likely since the case is as old, if not older than the PSU, but I don't know the life expectancy of a case.

I have checked the motherboard and I don't see any damage to the capacitors or the board itself, and I'm really hoping it's not the CPU.

Is there an alternative way of booting up the PC without pressing the button on the case?

Obviously with the age of the PSU I will look at replacing it in the near future, but for now it'll have to do as I need my PC for school and don't currently have the money to buy one.
 

PC Tailor

Judicious
Ambassador
using the paperclip method and it's working 100%
This is not correct and not a good way of checking the integrity of the PSU. The paperclip method only shows whether the PSU can START UP but not whether it can actually deliver power correctly and in a way that is safe for the PC.

Part of the boot up process is an OK Signal between CPU and PSU, this paperclip method does not simulate this. On top of this most faulty PSUs begin to fault when load is induced, the paperclip method also does not induce any load.

In short, I've had MANY PSUs perfectly pass the paperclip test and then prove to be faulty. The most likely culprit in this case is the PSU simply due to the sheer poor quality of it. The only definitive way to be able to test these features are by swapping the component and seeing if the issue persists.

CPU failure is also much rarer once user error has been eliminated.
 
Oct 4, 2020
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Thank you very much for your help.

I will take it into a professional soon to get a proper diagnosis, just to be sure, and then replace the necessary hardware.
 
Reactions: PC Tailor
Thank you very much for your help.

I will take it into a professional soon to get a proper diagnosis, just to be sure, and then replace the necessary hardware.
Why not at least start by buying a quality PSU. You're using a second hand PSU that was never really good to begin with. That should be THE FIRST THING you replace in that PC.
 

PC Tailor

Judicious
Ambassador
Thank you very much for your help.

I will take it into a professional soon to get a proper diagnosis, just to be sure, and then replace the necessary hardware.
I really agree with Jonnyguru above. Even if the PSU isn't the root cause of the issue, you really should replace it unless you want to take the risk that comes with keeping that PSU.
 
Oct 4, 2020
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Could you recommend some PSUs please? I am on a very tight budget so I'm not looking for anything fancy. Just enough to power my hardware.

Here are my specs again:
Ryzen 3 2200g (no overclock)
1x 8gb 2666mhz RAM
XFX Rx570
Asus Prime a320m-k motherboard
 

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