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[SOLVED] PC Randomly Hard Resetting for no reason

Jun 23, 2020
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Specs:
https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Happyrobot33/saved/#view=3cGz7P

My computer for some reason keeps hard resetting. nothing in event viewer seems to indicate why. the only lead I have is that the motherboard LED goes red when it resets. also windows 10's built-in memory checker didn't find any issues with my ram. this is after changing out my motherboard, CPU, and ram due to an upgrade. the issue just started occurring after this upgrade.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Those memory modules are not listed as validated for that motherboard by the Corsair memory finder. The ONLY 3200mhz 2 x16GB CL16 kit listed by Corsair as compatible with the B450-F is this one:

https://www.corsair.com/us/en/Categories/Products/Memory/VENGEANCE-LPX/p/CMK16GX4M2Z3200C16


You can use the Corsair memory finder OR the G.Skill memory configurator, to find memory modules that Corsair or G.Skill say is validated. Using memory that they do NOT say is validated, CAN still work, but usually is problematic. If it works, they generally know it and they SAY it works for any specific motherboard.

Corsair memory finder: https://www.corsair.com/us/en/memoryfinder?type=motherboard

G.Skill memory configurator: https://www.gskill.com/configurator

It's always POSSIBLE this problem is not related to that, but when memory is not listed by Corsair or G.Skill as compatible with a certain motherboard, it DOES usually result in some kind of issues. What you can TRY, is bumping up the DRAM voltage slightly, usually something like a .020v increase over the XMP specified voltage does the trick. You could even just go straight to 1.36v, rather than 1.35v, and be totally fine in terms of safe voltage since we are good up to 1.4v without question and some memory kits have DDR4 XMP voltage specifications of all the way up to 1.45v. I wouldn't recommend running past 1.4v on any modern platform though if you want to avoid possible damage to the internal memory controller.

How old is your power supply?
 
Jun 23, 2020
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my power supply is only about a year old at most. i just did a windows update and it has been stable for about an hour, although not sure if that fixed it because its very random when it decides to restart.
 
Jun 23, 2020
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Ok so the windows update did not fix it, although it allowed it to work for 3 hours. For some reason in BIOS the "auto" voltage for DRAM was 1.2. i changed it to 1.35 and am going to see if that works.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Do you have the XMP profile for the memory enabled in the BIOS? Sounds like you don't and that it is on it's default configuration. The memory isn't going to run at it's proper speed, timings and voltage UNLESS you enable the D.O.C.P (ASUS version of XMP/A-XMP) profile in the BIOS. Once you do that, you may not need to do anything else with the DRAM voltage. So set the XMP/D.O.C.P profile to Profile 1, save the BIOS settings and exit. Boot and see how it does after that.
 
Jun 23, 2020
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Do you have the XMP profile for the memory enabled in the BIOS? Sounds like you don't and that it is on it's default configuration. The memory isn't going to run at it's proper speed, timings and voltage UNLESS you enable the D.O.C.P (ASUS version of XMP/A-XMP) profile in the BIOS. Once you do that, you may not need to do anything else with the DRAM voltage. So set the XMP/D.O.C.P profile to Profile 1, save the BIOS settings and exit. Boot and see how it does after that.
Doesnt seem to help. here's my CPU-Z report
https://pastebin.com/54dVUdhU
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Based on that report, your memory is still set to 2133mhz, not 3200mhz, so that is a problem. Either you didn't do something right, or missed a step, or the memory isn't compatible at it's rated specs and is defaulting back to 2133mhz despite being configured properly.

Put a flash drive in one of the motherboard USB ports. Go into the BIOS. Navigate to the memory page where the D.O.C.P profile and other memory settings are located and take a screenshot by pressing F12. That should take screenshots and save them to your flash drive. Then you can post them here.

In Windows, you can do the same thing rather than using pastebin, by pressing the Windows key + PrtScn, and then navigating to the Screenshots folder in Windows file explorer. You'll need to upload any screenshots to an image hosting site like Imgur.

 
Jun 23, 2020
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Hang on. might have also figured out what it is.

In event viewer an error is "The AsusFanControlService service terminated unexpectedly. It has done this 1 time(s)."

Apparently this is an issue that can cause random restarts. I'm going to attempt to have this service disabled as it doesn't seem to affect my fans at all anyway.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, it would make sense, because the memory controller is IN the CPU, and just about everything attached to the system runs THROUGH the CPU at some point, plus you have already had instant shut downs, which can absolutely be a symptom of a CPU problem. Bent pins can cause just about any symptom you can think of.

Also, try to find a setting called "DRAM training voltage" and set it to 1.35v just like the DRAM voltage, which, by the way, is perfectly fine and is exactly how it should be.
 
Jun 23, 2020
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So it seems DRAM Training voltage isn't on this bios. I have swapped the RAM to a1 and b1 respectively just in case that's the issue. After swapping it seems that even though the target frequency is 3200mhz it only is doing 2133mhz. I have also uninstalled AI Suite as I didn't really use it in the first place. I wish I could find a way to trigger it as earlier it went for 2 and a half hours without resetting.
 
Jun 23, 2020
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So Its probably fixed now. uptime has been 9 hours straight with no problems. the fix was either swapping the ram slots or uninstalling AI Suite.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Probably it was uninstalling AI suite. ALL of the bundled software packages that come with motherboards, ASUS, Gigabyte, ASRock, MSI, doesn't matter, they are all problematic and are like intentionally installing a problem as far as I'm concerned. I'd put the memory back in the A2 and B2 slots which are the second and fourth slots over from the CPU socket.

Also, I'd give this a look at well.

If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release.


Second,

go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



The last thing we want to look at,

for now anyhow, is the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.

 

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