Question PC randomly restarts only when gaming.

Apr 15, 2020
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The PC restarts only when gaming.
Until a few weeks ago it worked like a charm, I didn't changed anything hardware wise.

  • I've reinstalled and tried Windows 7, 8.1 and 10, all x64.
  • I've reset the BIOS.
  • I've updated the drivers and the Windows.

The temps are between 30 Celsius(89 Fahrenheit) in idle and maximum 65 Celsius(150 Fahrenheit) while gaming.
I don't use overclocking.


All the components where new when I brought them.

My system:

  • Ryzen 2600X + a big aftermarket cooler.
  • GTX 1070 MSI.
  • 16GB DDR4 3000mhz.
  • Gigabyte AX 370 Gaming 5
  • Samsung SSD
  • 700W MS-Tech power supply.
 

MadsModsat

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The one thing that stands out when looking at your hardware, is the PSU. It is a poor quality unit, which can't be recommended.

Although you mention all components were purchased brand new, you don't mention how old they are now.

Even if the PSU has been working fine so far, PSU performance can degrade over time, especially poor quality units can suffer from this, and it could be likely, that the PSU is no longer capable of supplying sufficient power for your system.

A PSU which doesn't provide sufficient power for the system, often causes random crashes like the ones you experience, since they occur in situations where the PSU is under heavy load.

If you know someone who can lend you a known working PSU with sufficient power for your system, it could be a way to quickly narrow down the list of possible causes, and help determine if the PSU is at fault, or if the problem is more likely caused by something else
 
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Apr 15, 2020
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All the components have are around 1 year old, some of them still have one more year of warranty.
All except the power supply, which I got it second hand/refurbished. I know whats the tendency here - to point the finger towards the power supply, and it my the right thing to do. I just want to eliminate all the variables before I go and spend 70 bucks on a new one.

The option with lending a power supply from someone else is the best test but right now there's no such option, unfortunately.

Thanks for your reply.
 

MadsModsat

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I know whats the tendency here - to point the finger towards the power supply
I can see what you mean, but sometimes reccomendations that seems to be a frequently offered solution, are actually based on the fact, that it is actually very often the correct solution - not just because it is funny recommending someone to spend their money on something completely unneccesary, without having any valid reasons for recommending it. I think it is safe to say, that most people on these forums, are only here with the best intentions in mind

To be honest, the additional information you provided about the age and condition of the PSU, actually makes it stand out even more as the most likely cause of the problem, in my opinion. Poor qualilty, refurbished.

But hopefully someone else can offer some advice which you find more useful. I can't positively say that the PSU is the actual problem, but with the details provided so far, that is definately the first piece of hardware I would personally try to either confirm or rule out as the most likely cause of the problem, before chasing possible dead ends in other areas.
 
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Apr 15, 2020
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To be honest if the power supply has a problem, I'm more worried if it can damage some other components than is to "lose" some money on a new one.

What specs would you recommend for a new one? What wattage, what % of efficiency, what protections, brand, etc?
 

MadsModsat

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If you follow this link to the PSU guide, you'll find a lot of solid advice and recommendations for picking the right PSU for your system.

This way you will also be able to determine for yourself, if you find the suggested models are well suited for your specific requirements, and not just something which is recommended automatically with little consideration for your actual needs.
 
Reactions: Andre-V
Apr 15, 2020
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If you follow this link to the PSU guide, you'll find a lot of solid advice and recommendations for picking the right PSU for your system.

This way you will also be able to determine for yourself, if you find the suggested models are well suited for your specific requirements, and not just something which is recommended automatically with little consideration for your actual needs.
Thanks.
 

MadsModsat

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The reason I don't recommend a specific PSU, is that I personally prefer to buy power supplies which costs a bit more than many people find reasonable. So I don't want to recommend something outside your budget, which wouldn't be any kind of help anayways.

__

But I'll add a personal opinion, which could help explain why.

I apologize for the wall of text, I can't blame you if you don't read it.

But I'll add it anyway, because I actually think it is important, and it is something I care about.

This not meant as a lecture or a recommendation, just to explain myself, and hopefully it will also explain why I don't blame your PSU because it is a trend, but because I actually put some thought into it.

"The often repeated advice" :

I know a PSU isn't as exciting to buy as other hardware components. But the PSU is in many ways one of the most important components of all.

Most importantly, it is what keeps the system alive, but on the other hand it can also turn out to be the most destructive component of all. Many people don't really appreciate the importance of a good quality power house, and it is a shame.

Some people happily invest in an RTX2080 TI, but decide to save money on the PSU. But the PSU is the one component which has the potential to damage all components connected to it beyond repair, if it fails in a worst case scenario.

Even if a poor quality PSU never fails while in use, it often causes damage anyway, by not providing stable and sufficient power, supplying precise voltages that doesn't fluctuate constantly or excessively.
Components connected to a poor quality power supply are known fail prematurely in some cases.


"Important factors people rarely even take into consideration"

In addition, many PSUs of poor quallity lack some of the safety features found on higher quality PSUs, which are both there to protect the components in the PC, but also the electrical wiring outside the PSU thus avoid being a potential fire hazard, if things go horribly wrong.

Some people's insurances aren't even valid in a situation where a fire is caused by electrical equipment - for me personally, that is something I have to pay in addition to my insurance policy, so it is not something I make up.
Most people I know personally, has decided not to pay that additional fee, so with my personal experience in mind, the mentioned scenario is actually something I consider to be a very real and possible outcome.

"Personal reasons"

So when I buy a new PSU, I don't look only for a popular name, the factory warranty is also useful as an indication to the quality.

The PSU I have now, has a 13 year factory warranty, which tells me, that this is the manufactuers life expectancy of the components being used.
The factury naturally don't want to be replacing faulty units under warranty all the time, so interpret it as if they beleive their porduct will be safe and develop no defects for 13 years.

On the other hand, when you buy a PSU with a 3 year warranty, some even offer one year only, that indicates to me, that manufactuer don't feel they can guarantee that the PSU won't fail for longer than 3 years, or sometimes as little as one year.

So if I were to make a specific recommendation for you, which I could give with a good conscience at the same time, factoring in everything written above, I would probably recommend something a bit over the top.

I don't mind recommending PSUs, but I also don't want to provide false advice. In this case, where you are aprehensive about blaming the PSU primarely (which is not a negative thing at all, always look for a second opinion, there are many "experts" online), I think it is very important to provide good advice, so you don't feel almost "forced" by popular demand, to go out and buy a new PSU.

So being well aware that I would probably recommend something over the top, because my personal opinion plays a part in it, I think the best recomendation I can give and feel good about, is a source for solid information which is factual and not personal opinion

At the same time, I actually hope someone will see your thread and have a specific recommendation which is perfect for your specific requirements.


But a high quality PSU, can fail spectacularly as well, by the possiblity of it happening, is significantly less then with a poor quality PSU, often advertised with specs above it actual performance capabilites - altso contributing to a high failure rate.



HOWEVER, I can't say with no kind of doubt, that your PSU is faulty and is the only possible cause for the problems you are experiencing with your PC currently.

You have the computer next to you, you know all the detials which would be impossible to include in a forum thread.
So if you feel like my advice is completely off, you have a better reason for that, than I do.

But with the details you have provided in mind, I actually believe the PSU is the most likely component to be causing the stability issues, but I can definately also be wrong.

Sometimes when asking for advice, you'll be offered a variety of different suggestions and advice.
They can't all be the right ones, but one of the recommendations will often turn out to be the right solution - this is my suggestion, someone will hopefully be able to come up with different recomendations.

Personally Seasonic is one of the manufacturrers I prefer the most. Sometimes other manufacturers sell PSU under their own name, but based on a platform from someone else, so my previous PSU was a Corsair AX860, which is actually a Seasonic platform. Super Flower are also known for quality (despite the name, which sound cheap to me :p )

I've primarely been buiyng PSUs from Seasonic and Corsair.

Corsair RMx PSUs are regularly recommended, reasonably priced and good quality.
 
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Apr 15, 2020
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I'm impressed by your...gargantuan message ;)
Seriously, I appreciate it.

So PSU is like the stomach - not easily seen and apparently not a front function but actualy is the most vital because it gives fuel/energy to the other organs and the rest of the body.

What PSU is that with 13 years warranty?
The most I've seen in my country is with 5 years warranty and some people complain that the cooler makes noise.

What do you think of these?
 

MadsModsat

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As it shows, I sometimes forget to be precise and on point and just begin rambling on instead.
I'm impresssed you manged to stay awake and chew your way through the whole thing :D

I was wrong about the factory warranty on my current PSU, it is 12 years and not 13.

This is the PSU I currently have in my system - Seasonic Prime Ultra Platinum 850
(I'm trying to link to the specific model, but you may be redirected to the more powerful 1000W instead, because the page defaults to that one).

850 watt is not required for my current system, I could definately go for a less powerful model.
But I was using multi-GPU computers for many years, so I think it was more out of an old habit I went for the 850 watt model, than an actual requirement. Also the PSU I had before this one was an 860 watt, so I did go down a little bit :p

I'll take a look at your links and report back

EDIT :


So PSU is like the stomach - not easily seen and apparently not a front function but actualy is the most vital because it gives fuel/energy to the other organs and the rest of the body.
I quite like this way of describing it, I'll try and remember it, it could become very useful, actually :)

It pretty much sums up everything I wrote in my quite lengthy post, in just a few words
 
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MadsModsat

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I fanally looked at the power supplies you linked to.

To be honest, I can't recommend any of them. I'm not trying to be rude or sound critical, I'm aware of your situation and what you are looking for from a PSU.

But the complete lack of reviews done by reputable review sites, is a bad sign already.

The completely unknown names of the manufacturers, except the InterTech - Energon one, is a big warning sign, and eventhough I'm familiar with InterTech - Energon, they are very poor quality power supplies with a disastrous reputation.

I'll do my best to keep it a bit short, but I can't promise anything, as you may have noticed.

In general, good quality power supplies are rated by the performance they are able to supply continously, without being overloaded or become more unstable, possibly supplying fluctuating voltages or inaccurate voltages, which cause damage to the hardware connected to it..

Poor quality power supllies on the other hand, are sometimes rated by their peak power number, which is the maximum performance it is capable of, for a very short time.

So a quality PSU rated at 550 watt (continous performance) usually have a higher peak performance number than the advertised 550watt

This means that a poor quality 650 watt PSU, which is only capable of 650 watt for a short duration, can be insufficient to power a system, which the quality 550 watt PSU is fully capable of, because the 650 watt model actually has a lower performance potential with regards to continous performance.

So when you are looking for a PSU to buy, do not focus purely on the number of watt or the 80+ efficiency rating, since it says very little about build quality and components used for the manufacturing of it.

Some manufacturers are very "creative", sometimes almost deceptive, when stating the specifications of some of the very cheap power supplies, so choose wisely


I would highly recommend, that you purchase a PSU from a known brand with good reputation and one of their models that are both reasonable quality, and not too expensive.

Even well respected manufacturers sell both terrible PSUs and some really good ones. It is important to choose the right model.

When I recommend choosing a well known manufacturer and I write good quality, that doesn't mean overly expensive, overkill or anything like that.

There are good quality PSUs, from big manufacturers, that doesn't cost you a fortune, which doesn't damage hardware and isn't a potential fire hazzard.

I honestly hope you will consider that option just one more time, before buying a PSU like the ones in your link.

Corsair has some fairly good PSUs which are often recommended currently, as a very good purchase, all things considered.
 

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