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Question PC reboots randomly, unable to identify the problem

thesenate

Commendable
Feb 28, 2018
21
2
1,515
0
Hi everyone,
For a few weeks now my budget PC has been restarting randomly, especially while running games (it rebooted once while I was browsing). At times I can play for a few hours without any issues, but then it suddenly reboots. Windows Event Viewer shows Event 41, Kernel Power. The specifications of my system are:

CPU: Intel Pentium G4560
GPU: Asus GTX 1050 Ti
RAM: 8GB Crucial DDR4 1.2v 2400Mhz
PSU: Corsair VS450
Motherboard: MSI H110M Pro-VH Plus

My first thought was that the PSU must be faulty. I purchased a Corsair CX550. It worked fine for a day, after which it rebooted one time, just like with the old PSU. The CX550 stopped working after this. My system would not POST. I took my PC apart and reassembled it entirely, but I still couldn't get it to work. I put my VS450 back in and the system is able to boot now, but it still restarts when under load. I'm not sure whether the CX550 was faulty to begin with or my system somehow messed it up, so I'm afraid to purchase another PSU.

I'm sure it's not a HDD or OS problem since I have the same issue on a Linux distribution running on a separate HDD.
I don't think the GPU is causing it either since I don't see any strange visual artifacts when it reboots. Running a GPU stress test sometimes causes it to reboot.
As for the RAM, I ran memtest86 and couldn't find any issues. I also tested it with a different stick of RAM.

I've tried connecting the PC to a few different power outlets around my house but haven't had much luck.
Diagnosing this issue has been very difficult and I'm not sure what I should try next. I would really appreciate some help with this.

Thanks.
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Ambassador
Random reboots or shutdowns are mostly caused by 2 issues:
  1. CPU/GPU overheats and to prevent any damage, system shuts down.
  2. PSU fails to deliver enough power to the GPU or fails to keep smooth enough voltage for PC's operation.
First check your CPU/GPU temps, both at idle and under load. If temps are within reason then it's safe to assume that it's the PSU who is acting up.

Also, do note that Corsair VS is the worst PSU offered by Corsair and it's low build quality PSU. I wouldn't use it to power even an office PC without dedicated GPU and which never sees any high loads, let alone powering a gaming PC with it with dedicated GPU in it.

Corsair CX you bought isn't much better than the VS series. With Corsair CX, i MIGHT use it to power low-end office PC which doesn't have dedicated GPU in it but only and ONLY when there is no other better choice than CX series, which at best, is mediocre quality PSU. If the PC has dedicated GPU in it (like most gaming PCs are) then Corsair CX is instantly off the table. The reason? Very same reason you're experiencing - inability to power the PC on higher power consumption loads (e.g gaming).

Only fix is to buy a new, good quality and up to the date PSU. Here, i suggest getting any Seasonic unit, in 500W range. E.g: Focus 550, Focus+ 550, PRIME Ultra 550 Gold or PRIME Ultra 550 Platinum,
pcpp: https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/bkp323,9nmxFT,KmgzK8,XndxFT/

Warranty wise;
Corsair VS series: 3 years
Corsair CX series: 5 years
Seasonic Focus: 7 years
Seasonic Focus+: 10 years
Seasonic PRIME: 12 years (includes all PRIME models: regular, Fanless, AirTouch, SnowSilent, Ultra)

All 3 of my PCs: Skylake, Haswell and AMD are also powered by Seasonic. Full specs with pics in my sig.

Oh, one more thing.
You can cheap out on every other component inside the PC except PSU. Since PSU powers everything, it is the most important component inside the PC. Also, while the PSU warranty covers the PSU itself and you can RMA the blown PSU, the PSU warranty doesn't cover any other component the PSU fried.

Most people learn the hard way not to cheap out on a PSU when low quality PSU blows and takes part of the system or the whole system with it. Even entire houses have been burned down because of the fire low quality PSU caused when it blowed up.

Like it or not, if you want your PC to work for years to come without any risk of fire and/or damage to your components, you need to hand out some money for good quality PSU. I'm not talking that you need to go with the best PSU money can buy, e.g Seasonic PRIME 650 (80+ Titanium), which costs $185+ (and which also powers my Skylake build). Seasonic Focus 550 (80+ Gold) i linked above costs $89 and is more than enough for your PC, both wattage and build quality wise.
 
Reactions: thesenate

thesenate

Commendable
Feb 28, 2018
21
2
1,515
0
@Aeacus My CPU temperature is around 65° and GPU temperature is at around 75° before it reboots, which is quite normal for my setup.

The only Seasonic product in the 500W range I can find in my country is the S12II SERIES 80+ Bronze 520W. Is it reliable? It looks like it's a very old unit.

I found out about the VS series being bad right after the return window ended. I ended up using it for two years.

What I'm worried about is whether it somehow damaged my other components, since I'm having the same issue with two different PSUs.


Thanks.
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Ambassador
Your temps are fine. So, it's the PSU who is acting up (which isn't a surprise for me).

The thing with Corsair low end PSUs is that it's well known them dying once few years pass, or at best, just after their warranty period ends. Seasonic PSUs, even the older models, are known to outlast their warranty period with several years. I've seen old Seasonic S12 series PSUs, that initially came with 3 years of warranty, still going strong after 8 years of service.

Seasonic S12II-520, despite being old platform (9 or so years), is the best group-regulated PSU ever made. Seasonic S12II series is one of the few PSUs which has been tried, tested and proven to be reliable. Even to this date, Seasonic still makes and sells the old but reliable S12II series.

And i'm no stranger to S12II series either. My AMD build was powered by S12II-520 PSU for several years before i bought Focus+ PSU for it. At one point of time, i even used S12II-520 to power my high-end Skylake build (before i bought PRIME Titanium PSU for it). Currently, i have my trusty S12II-520 in reserve, just in case something should happen with my current Seasonic PSUs and i need to power the PC.

However, care to give a link(s) to your local store(s) so i can look and see if there are any other, more modern but still good quality PSUs available?
Don't get me wrong, Seasonic S12II-520 is very solid PSU but it's platform age is something which makes it hard to suggest at current date. Still, at some parts of the world (e.g in developing countries, especially in least developed countries) where latest tech isn't available, S12II can be the best choice, despite it's age.
 
Also, do note that Corsair VS is the worst PSU offered by Corsair and it's low build quality PSU. I wouldn't use it to power even an office PC without dedicated GPU and which never sees any high loads, let alone powering a gaming PC with it with dedicated GPU in it.

Corsair CX you bought isn't much better than the VS series. With Corsair CX, i MIGHT use it to power low-end office PC which doesn't have dedicated GPU in it but only and ONLY when there is no other better choice than CX series, which at best, is mediocre quality PSU. If the PC has dedicated GPU in it (like most gaming PCs are) then Corsair CX is instantly off the table. The reason? Very same reason you're experiencing - inability to power the PC on higher power consumption loads (e.g gaming).
You guys need to study up on your PSU topologies before giving poor advice.

There's a HUGE difference between a CX and a VS.

VS is double forward, group regulated. A CX uses an LLC topology with DC to DC for the +3.3V and +5V.

It can handle an RTX 2080 Ti or a Vega 64... it can handle a 1050 Ti.

The problem is likely the motherboard.
 
Reactions: ChumP
@Aeacus My CPU temperature is around 65° and GPU temperature is at around 75° before it reboots, which is quite normal for my setup.

The only Seasonic product in the 500W range I can find in my country is the S12II SERIES 80+ Bronze 520W. Is it reliable? It looks like it's a very old unit.

I found out about the VS series being bad right after the return window ended. I ended up using it for two years.

What I'm worried about is whether it somehow damaged my other components, since I'm having the same issue with two different PSUs.


Thanks.
The Seasonic S12II is double forward. It's actually worse than the CX.

Unfortunately, the people that are responding to your post don't know anything about power supplies, so you should take their advice with a grain of salt.

Seems to me that your motherboard is failing.
 
Reactions: ChumP

Aeacus

Glorious
Ambassador
The Seasonic S12II is double forward. It's actually worse than the CX.
Said by the guy who works for Corsair...

Yet, back in the day when S12II-520 was released, it got very high review score on your site,
link: https://web.archive.org/web/20150117044132/http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story5&reid=185

Also, just because PSU has DC-DC doesn't make it instantly better than group-regulated. A well built group-regulated PSU will outperform poorly made DC-DC PSU.

Seems to me that your motherboard is failing.
After 2 years of usage, OP's VS series (which are known to last about that time) starts acting up. OP bought CX series, which is "a lot better" according to you and got only one power-up out of it until CX died. It's a miracle that the rest of the build didn't fry. So, OP put VS back with the same acting up problems and you're saying it's the MoBo?

If it's the MoBo, chances are that much inferior VS would go sky high far easier than better built CX series? No?

Only the first store seems to have any Seasonic products in stock.
Oh, don't mind jonnyguru. He is personally affiliated with Corsair and probably has to make Corsair PSUs look good, while smashing the competition (in this case, Seasonic).

Amazon.in has few Seasonic units for sale, including up-to-the-date models. Sadly, Seasonic PSUs cost quite a lot in India,
link: https://www.amazon.in/stores/node/17316916031?_encoding=UTF8&field-lbr_brands_browse-bin=Seasonic&ref_=bl_dp_s_web_17316916031

Rather than paying premium price for SSR-650PX aka Seasonic Focus+ 650 80+ Platinum (28.000 rupees), i'd look towards more reasonable priced, but still good quality PSU, e.g:

Antec High Current Gamer 850m (OEM: Seasonic),
amazon: https://www.amazon.in/Antec-HCG850-Current-Bronze-850/dp/B00BT6O2TY
review: https://www.techpowerup.com/review/antec-hcg-850m/

Corsair RM650 (OEM: CWT),
amazon: https://www.amazon.in/Corsair-RM650-Power-Supply-CP-9020194-UK/dp/B07RYNFR8R
review: http://www.jonnyguru.com/blog/2013/11/11/corsair-rm650-650w-power-supply/

While both of these units have higher wattage capacity than your PC ever needs, it doesn't harm your PC or PSU in any way. Only PSU's efficiency is affected compared to using the 550W unit or 850W unit. Though, the difference in efficiency is so small that it's negligible.

Is there any chance that this could be a motherboard issue? I don't get any errors and don't think it's getting shorted.
It could be, yes. And it doesn't help that your MoBo is also on the cheaper end. However, most of the times, the symptoms you describe are caused by the PSU. And both of those Corsair units you tested (VS and CX) aren't good ones to begin with.

Here's what i'd do if i were you:
1. Buy good quality PSU.
2.1. If problem goes away, you'd know what the issue was.
2.2 However if issue remains, buy new MoBo. Most likely new CPU-MoBo-RAM combo (if you have the money).
3. With new good quality PSU and new MoBo, you'd have better PC overall.

However, if you buy new MoBo and issue goes away, you'd have good MoBo with bad PSU (your VS series) and chances are that VS series can fry your new MoBo, especially since it's out of warranty and won't last much longer either. Making you to want to buy new, good quality PSU regardless.
 

Cespenar

Distinguished
Jan 21, 2010
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0
18,640
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I have a similar problem:
Kernel power Event ID 41 Task category 63, always shows in Events as a Critical Event.

Every single day from about October 2019 when I had a windows update I get a random reboot.
Many PC users have this problem. I have instigated the so-called fixes, but nothing helps for me.

Some users get good results, others don't.
I also read on Google where Microsoft closed help for this problem.
I can't get help from Microsoft so this is probably correct.
I have to live with this problem knowing it won't be fixed.
 

Aeacus

Glorious
Ambassador
have a similar problem:
While the issue in this topic is about Kernel Power event, it isn't respectful towards OP for you to hijack his topic with your issue. Here, i suggest you'll make a new topic about your issue in Systems subforum. Also, include more info, including full system specs and all the fixes you've tried so far, in chronological order. The more info you'll provide - the easier it is for us to help you.
 
Reactions: Cespenar

thesenate

Commendable
Feb 28, 2018
21
2
1,515
0
@Aeacus @jonnyguru thanks for the help. I think I'll get a new PSU first and RMA the motherboard for now. I'll get a new CPU+motherboard later this year if the prices don't increase too much due to the virus.

I have a similar problem:
Kernel power Event ID 41 Task category 63, always shows in Events as a Critical Event.

Every single day from about October 2019 when I had a windows update I get a random reboot.
Many PC users have this problem. I have instigated the so-called fixes, but nothing helps for me.

Some users get good results, others don't.
I also read on Google where Microsoft closed help for this problem.
I can't get help from Microsoft so this is probably correct.
I have to live with this problem knowing it won't be fixed.
Are you sure it's a Windows problem? You should try running a Linux distribution on a separate hard drive for a few days and see if the problem persists. In my case I continued to experience reboots on Linux Mint so I'm fairly certain it wasn't caused by Windows
 
Reactions: Aeacus and Cespenar

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