Question PC reboots while playing games after a lot of hours

Mar 27, 2020
11
0
10
0
My pc reboots itself after a few hours of gaming and its kinda need "rest" for an hour to play again the game.
Specs are:

------------------
System Information
------------------

System Manufacturer: MSI
System Model: MS-7968
BIOS: 1.B0 (type: UEFI)
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-6600K CPU @ 3.50GHz (4 CPUs), ~3.5GHz
Memory: 16384MB RAM
Available OS Memory: 16344MB RAM
Page File: 6229MB used, 11139MB available
---------------
Display Devices
---------------
Card name: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970
Manufacturer: NVIDIA
Chip type: GeForce GTX 970
DAC type: Integrated RAMDAC
Device Type: Full Device (POST)
Device Key: Enum\PCI\VEN_10DE&DEV_13C2&SUBSYS_31601462&REV_A1
Device Status: 0180200A [DN_DRIVER_LOADED|DN_STARTED|DN_DISABLEABLE|DN_NT_ENUMERATOR|DN_NT_DRIVER]
Device Problem Code: No Problem
Driver Problem Code: Unknown
Display Memory: 12215 MB
Dedicated Memory: 4043 MB
Shared Memory: 8172 MB
Current Mode: 1920 x 1080 (32 bit) (60Hz)
HDR Support: Not Supported

Thanks for the support!
 
Mar 27, 2020
11
0
10
0
I am starting to play another and it doesn't let me play, automatically restarts itself, the PC boots on but I can't play anything for some time. Only surf on the internet

My psu: SeaSonic Electronics S12G Series SSR-650RT Active PFC F3 650W 80 PLUS Gold
@Phaaze88
 
Mar 28, 2020
2
0
10
0
I had a similiar issue a few weeks ago. I agree with Phaaze88 in the probable cause is the PSU. Upgrading from a low 650 watt myself to a 1200 watt. Also, consider in cleaning out the system (inside) from top to bottom. Some say once a week and others say longer.
 

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
Found a review of the unit: https://www.anandtech.com/show/7761/seasonic-s12g-650w-power-supply-review
"Its Achilles' heel is that the S12G tends to run a little hot if heavily loaded for prolonged periods of time while inside a very warm environment; however, the only real-world scenario that we can imagine that would replicate such conditions is that of a powerful cryptocoin mining system built inside a poorly designed chassis. If you are planning to use the Seasonic S12G for powering such a system in a $20 case, that probably is a bad idea. However, if you are looking to buy a PSU for its high quality and performance and consider aesthetics and modularity to be secondary or unnecessary features, the Seasonic S12G is definitely worthy of strong consideration."

You're not crypto mining, but it doesn't change the fact that the unit was noted for running hot.
What is your case? How do you have it oriented in the case - fan up? Fan down?

Upgrading from a low 650 watt myself to a 1200 watt.
WOW. What are you powering to warrant that big of a jump?
With that much power, I could run a PC with a 5.0ghz 9900K + 2080Ti SLI ROG Strix OC and still have some headroom...
 
Mar 27, 2020
11
0
10
0
Found a review of the unit: https://www.anandtech.com/show/7761/seasonic-s12g-650w-power-supply-review
"Its Achilles' heel is that the S12G tends to run a little hot if heavily loaded for prolonged periods of time while inside a very warm environment; however, the only real-world scenario that we can imagine that would replicate such conditions is that of a powerful cryptocoin mining system built inside a poorly designed chassis. If you are planning to use the Seasonic S12G for powering such a system in a $20 case, that probably is a bad idea. However, if you are looking to buy a PSU for its high quality and performance and consider aesthetics and modularity to be secondary or unnecessary features, the Seasonic S12G is definitely worthy of strong consideration."

You're not crypto mining, but it doesn't change the fact that the unit was noted for running hot.
What is your case? How do you have it oriented in the case - fan up? Fan down?
.
The case I own is Carbide Series 200R Compact ATX Case
 
Mar 28, 2020
2
0
10
0
At Phase, Nothing too powerful. In fact, it's mediocre by today's standard.
MSI 970 Gaming MB, 12 GB DDR3 Ram, AMD FX 6350 Black, 1.5 TB HDD, 64 GB Sata. My case is an old Ibuypower one that's over 10 yrs old. Nothing original in the case except the blue led's :p

I knew I had problems with various components of BSOD's and well, both PSU and old GPU (1060 gtx 3gb) went out first. I'm fairly tech savy as to the components in things and did a little "exploratory surgery" in the two items only to confirm my suspicions. After saving up for those this month to get next week, I will again, have to save up for more RAM. Anything else will have to wait until next year or if I can find it well under $50.
 

vov4ik_il

Prominent
Mar 23, 2020
755
86
490
8
Please don't... the thread doesn't need to go in that direction.
It can turn into a flamewar.
Please don't... what? And where does the thread need to go? lul 🙃

@DudiBA
If you have a spare PSU to rule it out - nice, if not - you can try loading the components with synthetic stress and see what that does. If all stress tests pass - load CPU and GPU together. If that will reset it - you are likely down to either PSU or VRM. You can use AIDA64 for synthetic tests or any other tool of your choice.
 
Last edited:

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
Please don't... what? And where does the thread need to go? lul 🙃
Suggesting someone with the OP's specs should go and spend on a 1000w psu when a good 550 or 650w is more than enough, with that difference in cost either being saved or spent elsewhere.
The parts inside all degrade over time; if a unit is good for 5 years, then that's it whether one normally pulls 20% or 80% of the total wattage - it's good practice to replace that unit by that time.
 

vov4ik_il

Prominent
Mar 23, 2020
755
86
490
8
a good 550 or 650w is more than enough
I disagree with this statement since the power rating is the maximum the unit is rated to supply, and if constantly used will fail fairly fast. I am not rich enough to cheap out on PSU every year or two.
Moreover, I am not convinced it is the PSU yet. I had a similar problem and it turned out to be VRM.
 

Phaaze88

Splendid
Ambassador
I disagree with this statement since the power rating is the maximum the unit is rated to supply, and if constantly used will fail fairly fast. I am not rich enough to cheap out on PSU every year or two.
And that's what I was afraid you might say...

OP's 6600K - 75w
GTX 970: Some of the most power hungry GTX 970 models had a max up to 350w, so I will use this as a worse-case scenario.
20% of headroom for everything else
= 510w, and that's a worse-case scenario.

Here's my own setup:
7820X 4.5ghz, 3.0ghz cache OC pushing 245w
1080Ti - 300w
20% headroom
= 654w
I've been running this 750w Seasonic Prime unit for almost 4 years now, and it's not hiccuped at all.
What would either the OP or myself gain from 1000w?
 

vov4ik_il

Prominent
Mar 23, 2020
755
86
490
8
@Phaaze88
Well, it is a little more complicated.
The watt rating on the PSU is the total draw for all its' lines at the same time. It does not mean much.
Every single line (voltage regulated line, like 5v or 12v or any other) has a separate rating too. It is usually expressed as Amps and can be translated into Watt by formula 1V*1A=1VA=1W (to make things simple, assuming the "power factor" is 1.0).
Edit: Now those voltages are being further converted and regulated by the motherboard to suit various components' needs. The regulation efficiency there is also lower than 1.0.
Within PSU of a higher total rating, the individual lines have a higher Amp rating too and this is what really matters. You cannot just add and subtract those values from what it says on the box.
Check those samples below.



Now the point behind having a 40% larger PSU than you actually need has two subpoints:
  1. Switching power supply technologically did not advance in years. The standard format did not change for a long period of time as there is not much new to introduce. It is simple and those made 15 years ago still work if the components are not stressed too much. In fact, Large PSU needs no active cooling under low load and if equipped with variable speed cooler it will stop and be silent.
  2. Large PSU have 7-10 year warranty.
I have a few systems with PSUs that are more than 10 y/o (from the days of quad-R9-290X crypto-mining rigs) that have never failed yet. Different brands ranging from 1000-1400Watt.

And again, I would like to focus on troubleshooting the TS problem. I value your opinion greatly but will keep mine instead.
For now, I am not convinced that the PSU is the source of trouble yet. But if it turns to be the PSU, I would go for one that will last.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS