Question PC Restarting every hour after a power outage happened while it was booting.

Oct 16, 2021
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The title actually says it all, and yes, I gotta commend the perfect timing of our electricity provider. But before all of this, my PC actually had a history of randomly shutting down and the red LED in my PC case is blinking every second, but this stopped months ago. Now a new challenger came and I'm actually quite more scared than before. Kinda need a hand.
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
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The title actually says it all, and yes, I gotta commend the perfect timing of our electricity provider. But before all of this, my PC actually had a history of randomly shutting down and the red LED in my PC case is blinking every second, but this stopped months ago. Now a new challenger came and I'm actually quite more scared than before. Kinda need a hand.
could you list you pc parts in this format please:

Mainboard:
Processor:
Memory:
GPU 1:
Case:
Hard Disk:

have you tried reseating the ram and cpu again?
 
Oct 16, 2021
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could you list you pc parts in this format please:

Mainboard:
Processor:
Memory:
GPU 1:
Case:
Hard Disk:

have you tried reseating the ram and cpu again?
Motherboard: A68HM-E33 V2 (MS-7721)

Processor: AMD A6-6400K APU with Radeom(tm) HD Graphics, 3900Mhz, 1 Core, 2 Logical Processors

Physical Memory (RAM): 8 GB (4x2)

GPU: Palit GTX 750 StormX OC 1g

Case: I dont know, just a generic one with a good ventilation system I guess.

Hard Disk: Seagate 1gb

Also, what do you mean by resetting the ram or cpu? Oh and thanks for the quick response.
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
618
52
1,970
1
Motherboard: A68HM-E33 V2 (MS-7721)

Processor: AMD A6-6400K APU with Radeom(tm) HD Graphics, 3900Mhz, 1 Core, 2 Logical Processors

Physical Memory (RAM): 8 GB (4x2)

GPU: Palit GTX 750 StormX OC 1g

Case: I dont know, just a generic one with a good ventilation system I guess.

Hard Disk: Seagate 1gb

Also, what do you mean by resetting the ram or cpu? Oh and thanks for the quick response.
take the ram and cpu out and put them back in again, they might have come loose.
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
618
52
1,970
1
Motherboard: A68HM-E33 V2 (MS-7721)

Processor: AMD A6-6400K APU with Radeom(tm) HD Graphics, 3900Mhz, 1 Core, 2 Logical Processors

Physical Memory (RAM): 8 GB (4x2)

GPU: Palit GTX 750 StormX OC 1g

Case: I dont know, just a generic one with a good ventilation system I guess.

Hard Disk: Seagate 1gb

Also, what do you mean by resetting the ram or cpu? Oh and thanks for the quick response.
i apologize, i didnt see the part where your pc suffered a power outrage. can you try another hard drive?
 
Oct 16, 2021
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i apologize, i didnt see the part where your pc suffered a power outrage. can you try another hard drive?
I'm actually not really that knowledgeable when it comes to taking parts out of my computer, so I'd rather skip those parts because I did dust off my CPU and GPU fans like 3 months ago with the help of my relative. Is there any other way to fix this other than touching the PC components?
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
618
52
1,970
1
I'm actually not really that knowledgeable when it comes to taking parts out of my computer, so I'd rather skip those parts because I did dust off my CPU and GPU fans like 3 months ago with the help of my relative. Is there any other way to fix this other than touching the PC components?
i am sorry but because of the power outage, you have a chance of a failed hard drive or something else.

hopefully someone will come along with more ideas.
 
Oct 16, 2021
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the only ideas i have is remove the ram and cpu and back them back in and reinstall windows but making sure you have backed up your important things.
Ok so I did reseat the rams earlier, dusted off my cpu, applied thermal paste and also dusted off the gpu fans with my relative. I got to use my computer for a good 4 hours then it shuts down again. I also forgot to say that I have an AVR and I live in a place where power outage are frequent, done a lot of research and came into conclusion that my 4-yr old AVR is starting to worn out or it's my PSU?
 
Oct 16, 2021
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Oh yeah, can the PSU fan make noise if its going bad?
Also what do you recommend for a good PSU basing from my specs? Right now I have a generic AC/220V PSU.
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
618
52
1,970
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Oh yeah, can the PSU fan make noise if its going bad?
Also what do you recommend for a good PSU basing from my specs? Right now I have a generic AC/220V PSU.
looking at your gpu as that is the one component that uses the most energy, recommended psu would be 250w.

https://www.techpowerup.com/gpu-specs/palit-gtx-750-stormx-oc.b2797

have a look at this list for a psu:

 
Oct 16, 2021
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looking at your gpu as that is the one component that uses the most energy, recommended psu would be 250w.

https://www.techpowerup.com/gpu-specs/palit-gtx-750-stormx-oc.b2797

have a look at this list for a psu:

So it's actually the PSU that's not giving much electricity, kinda my fault because I actually bought that GPU a year after the PC without considering the PSU. No wonder it was having random shutdowns back then. How about the CPU though? Does it also have a specific watts to add to the GPU's?
I heard other people going up more than the recommended level, not sure how much really. Really sorry if Im asking a lot lol
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
618
52
1,970
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So it's actually the PSU that's not giving much electricity, kinda my fault because I actually bought that GPU a year after the PC without considering the PSU. No wonder it was having random shutdowns back then. How about the CPU though? Does it also have a specific watts to add to the GPU's?
I heard other people going up more than the recommended level, not sure how much really. Really sorry if Im asking a lot lol
no need for apologies, we all have to start somewhere.

your cpu is 65w tdp.

i always like to try make abit of headroom on the overall power so i would say get a 650w psu to be on the safe side. that is what i am using and i dont use a dedicated gpu so i have plenty of headroom on my system.

just note though that if you do get another gpu, check the power output and choose a psu accordingly.

what psu have you got?
 
Oct 16, 2021
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no need for apologies, we all have to start somewhere.

your cpu is 65w tdp.

i always like to try make abit of headroom on the overall power so i would say get a 650w psu to be on the safe side. that is what i am using and i dont use a dedicated gpu so i have plenty of headroom on my system.

just note though that if you do get another gpu, check the power output and choose a psu accordingly.

what psu have you got?
So if my GPU is 250w +65w for my CPU the recommended will be around 315w PSU?
Isn't 650w a bit too much?

Also my PSU is just a generic AC/220V
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
618
52
1,970
1
So if my GPU is 250w +65w for my CPU the recommended will be around 315w PSU?
Isn't 650w a bit too much?

Also my PSU is just a generic AC/220V
one thing i forgot to mention is your cpu tdp is 65w but it can go up depedning on how much stress your cpu does:

this is your cpu info:

https://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Bulldozer/AMD-A6-Series A6-6400K.html

if you click on the question mark next to thermal design power, it says this:

https://www.cpu-world.com/Glossary/M/Minimum_Maximum_power_dissipation.html

i only recommended 650 just to be on the safe side so you have plenty of headroom. it wont use the full 650w, only what your system will use.
 
Oct 16, 2021
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one thing i forgot to mention is your cpu tdp is 65w but it can go up depedning on how much stress your cpu does:

this is your cpu info:

https://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Bulldozer/AMD-A6-Series A6-6400K.html

if you click on the question mark next to thermal design power, it says this:

https://www.cpu-world.com/Glossary/M/Minimum_Maximum_power_dissipation.html

i only recommended 650 just to be on the safe side so you have plenty of headroom. it wont use the full 650w, only what your system will use.
So 650w is the safe number for my PC. I'll be updating once again after I change my PSU after the end of this month or (God please no) at the end of next month's after I got my check. Thank you so much for the help!
 
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avg9956

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Also my PSU is just a generic AC/220V
Would strongly avoid generic PSUs. It's a one way ticket that can turn your entire PC to scrap metal if and when they fail. They may not have adequate OCP and OVP protections in place.

Just to add.
Don't forget also to consider where your PSU is getting filtered power, which is through your AVR.
Your AVR's wattage capacity should also be considered.

I.e. If you have a 700W PSU, get a 700W AVR or higher
If you have a 700W PSU but use a 400W AVR and your system draws a total of 400W or more, your AVR won't be able to handle it and may get damaged.
If you have a 400W PSU but a 700W AVR, and your system draws a total of 400W or more, your PSU won't be able to handle it and may get damaged.

Think of electricity (Power/watts) as water and you need piping (Wattage capacity) to handle all of it. If the piping can't handle it because too much water is passing through the pipe, it will naturally burst. This is true for as well for power delivery systems (cables) and power supplies/voltage regulators

Your PC will only draw how much power it needs. It doesn't mean if you connect a 650W PSU that you're PC is using a total of 650W.
You can see your total power draw if you buy a UPS instead of an AVR that allows for wattage monitoring consumption (such as APC UPS) and connect it via USB.


Here's my power draw being shown on PowerChute, a monitoring software from my UPS. It only shows 400W load while my GPU is under load.
Some UPS allows you to monitor the total power consumption of your system which is very handy. It usually involves connecting your UPS to your PC via USB connection. Not all UPS has this feature though.
 

froggy8

Respectable
Nov 23, 2019
618
52
1,970
1
Would strongly avoid generic PSUs. It's a one way ticket that can turn your entire PC to scrap metal if and when they fail. They may not have adequate OCP and OVP protections in place.

Just to add.
Don't forget also to consider where your PSU is getting filtered power, which is through your AVR.
Your AVR's wattage capacity should also be considered.

I.e. If you have a 700W PSU, get a 700W AVR or higher
If you have a 700W PSU but use a 400W AVR and your system draws a total of 400W or more, your AVR won't be able to handle it and may get damaged.
If you have a 400W PSU but a 700W AVR, and your system draws a total of 400W or more, your PSU won't be able to handle it and may get damaged.

Think of electricity (Power/watts) as water and you need piping (Wattage capacity) to handle all of it. If the piping can't handle it because too much water is passing through the pipe, it will naturally burst. This is true for as well for power delivery systems (cables) and power supplies/voltage regulators

Your PC will only draw how much power it needs. It doesn't mean if you connect a 650W PSU that you're PC is using a total of 650W.
You can see your total power draw if you buy a UPS instead of an AVR that allows for wattage monitoring consumption (such as APC UPS) and connect it via USB.


Here's my power draw being shown on PowerChute, a monitoring software from my UPS. It only shows 400W load while my GPU is under load.
Some UPS allows you to monitor the total power consumption of your system which is very handy. It usually involves connecting your UPS to your PC via USB connection. Not all UPS has this feature though.
i was going to recommend a ups too as the OP has several power outage where he lives.
 

avg9956

Commendable
Apr 7, 2019
399
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So do I as well, I have frequent power outage. I have switched from AVR to UPS fully since a decade ago.
However for UPS, you do need to change the batteries once every 2 years or when your UPS starts beeping.
Batteries for UPS are usually economical enough to replace rather than buying a new UPS altogether which costs usually more. The only issue is being able to source a battery given current pandemic and supply chain constraints today.

I recently replaced a UPS battery too myself. You need to take extra precaution when doing so because you can get shocked while doing it.
I had to check first with a voltage detector to see if everything in the circuit was fully dead before replacing the battery as a safety measure.
 
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Oct 16, 2021
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So do I as well, I have frequent power outage. I have switched from AVR to UPS fully since a decade ago.
However for UPS, you do need to change the batteries once every 2 years or when your UPS starts beeping.
Batteries for UPS are usually economical enough to replace rather than buying a new UPS altogether which costs usually more. The only issue is being able to source a battery given current pandemic and supply chain constraints today.

I recently replaced a UPS battery too myself. You need to take extra precaution when doing so because you can get shocked while doing it.
I had to check first with a voltage detector to see if everything in the circuit was fully dead before replacing the battery as a safety measure.
Im trying to budget the PSU and USP at 100$-130$ altogether, do you think there's a good brand to fit with that?
 

avg9956

Commendable
Apr 7, 2019
399
92
1,790
20
For UPS:
APC UPS are expensive and well known. They're the brand that charges a premium for their UPS but they do generally have good UPS's, especially on their latest models.
There was one particular model they had in the BX series where they used bad capacitors for that particular model and someone complained it in a forum, but I will leave it at there.

If you're looking for a budget UPS, it depends where you're geographically located. I have noticed the Asian market offers different UPS brands (Powerlink, iLogic, etc.) in contrast to Western market (eaton, cyberpower). Just check the reviews of the UPS before buying. APC UPS however I've noticed are available globally which is probably why they're quite reputable.

For PSU:
I leave it to others to recommend, but usually I would check the reviews as well before buying to see if there are any issues with that particular model.
I usually stick to Seasonic PSUs strictly nowadays, but you can go for Corsair too. I strictly settle for Japanese capacitors, any generic Chinese capacitors I'd avoid personally. Depends on the price and quality you'd go for.

Alternatively here's a PSU tier list: https://www.gamingscan.com/psu-hierarchy/

The higher you go in the tier, naturally it becomes more expensive.

Here's a list of what Corsair PSU models:

VS - Design is old, interior circuitry is old. Retails outside of US. Also comes in grey (Newer version) or green (Older)
Bare minimum quality (office computer).

CV - Upgraded VS, specifically on the Active PFC to meet the 80+ Bronze Certificaiton

CX - Entry Level - Best of the budget line. (CX 2017 can meet silver sertification), can come in grey (Newer) or green
Fan Bearing: Sleeve

CS - Mid Range
Fan Bearing: Sleeve

GS - For intro level, has RGB for gamers. Also was a Bronze PSU (Discontinued)
Has fan management
Fan Bearing: Ball Bearing

Mid Range PSUs
CS - A bit more premium. Gold Certified and can carry a high load on single 12V Rail (Needed for Power hungry GPUs).
Has fan management

TX-M
Revival of the old TX line. Comes in Japanese capacitors. Has minor changes between the TX series
Semi Modular, fan is 135mm rifle bearing fan (very noisy but last longer)

High End PSUs
RM - Gold PSU. Minor changes between the 2018 and 2019 version. The 2019 version uses the 135mm Rifle Bearing fan.
RM does not have capacitors in its cables but is needed to counter act voltage ripple.
The 2019 version is updated to accomodate modern standby

RMx
Have capacitors in their cables (smooth out voltage ripple, less electrical noise)
Minimal difference between RM and RMx, but just an "upgraded version"
Uses nippon/chemicon caps (Japanese capacitors)

HX
Basically an RMx but platinum raider. Uses a 140mm fan
Generally a well liked PSU that is quiet even running at full load.

AX
Titanium rated, 0 RPM mode.
PSU will automatically not spin its fan when it doesnt need to.
Fan itself is 135mm FDB fan.
Source: https://www.custompcguide.net/the-differences-between-all-corsair-power-supply-units/
 
Oct 16, 2021
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For UPS:
APC UPS are expensive and well known. They're the brand that charges a premium for their UPS but they do generally have good UPS's, especially on their latest models.
There was one particular model they had in the BX series where they used bad capacitors for that particular model and someone complained it in a forum, but I will leave it at there.

If you're looking for a budget UPS, it depends where you're geographically located. I have noticed the Asian market offers different UPS brands (Powerlink, iLogic, etc.) in contrast to Western market (eaton, cyberpower). Just check the reviews of the UPS before buying. APC UPS however I've noticed are available globally which is probably why they're quite reputable.

For PSU:
I leave it to others to recommend, but usually I would check the reviews as well before buying to see if there are any issues with that particular model.
I usually stick to Seasonic PSUs strictly nowadays, but you can go for Corsair too. I strictly settle for Japanese capacitors, any generic Chinese capacitors I'd avoid personally. Depends on the price and quality you'd go for.

Alternatively here's a PSU tier list: https://www.gamingscan.com/psu-hierarchy/

The higher you go in the tier, naturally it becomes more expensive.

Here's a list of what Corsair PSU models:


Source: https://www.custompcguide.net/the-differences-between-all-corsair-power-supply-units/
Genuinely appreciate all the infos! I'll update once again after I setup these things.
 
Reactions: avg9956

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